Publication - Research and analysis

Scottish Household Survey 2019: twenty years of Scotland's people - summary report

Published: 12 Oct 2020

This publication synthesises 20 years of change (1999-2019) in Scottish society as measured by Scottish Household Survey data.

23 page PDF

2.8 MB

23 page PDF

2.8 MB

Contents
Scottish Household Survey 2019: twenty years of Scotland's people - summary report
Economic Activities Are Consistent

23 page PDF

2.8 MB

Economic Activities Are Consistent

This line graph shows the proportion of people over 16 in three economic statuses (Employed, Not in Labour Force, and Unemployed), from 1999 to 2019. It highlights that the majority of people were employed and that there was an increasing proportion of people in this category, while the proportion of people not in the labour force had decreased slightly over time.

The economic status of adults in Scotland has remained relatively stable over the last 20 years.

The proportion of adults in paid employment increased from 52% in 1999 to 56% in 2019, including those in full and part-time employment and self-employed adults.

The proportion of adults that were not in the labour force decreased in this period, from 43% to 40%. 

Additionally, the proportion of adults who were unemployed and looking for work decreased from 5% to 3%.

The proportion of adults caring for their home and family decreased from 8% of adults in 1999 to 4% in 2019 This represents the whole population and does not indicate unemployment rate.

More Women are in Paid Work

The proportion of both men and women aged 16 to 64 who were in paid work had increased between 1999 and 2019.

Over the last 20 years there are declining trends in men reporting to be employed full-time, unemployed and permanently sick or disabled. Increasing trends over the 20 years are evident in men reporting to be employed part-time and permanently retired.

For the economic activity of women, there was an increase in the proportions of those in self-employment and working full-time, and a decrease in women looking after the family or home. 

This line graph shows the proportion of men and women aged 16 to 64 that were in paid employment between 1999 and 2019. It highlights that while there consistently was a larger proportion of men in paid work, the proportion of women in work had increased significantly since 1999.

The proportion of women aged 16 to 64 with children in the household working full-time increased from 22% in 1999 and 30% in 2019

More Young Adults are in Higher Education

This bar chart shows main economic activities among adults aged 16 to 24, and the proportion of young adults who engaged in these activities in 1999 and 2019. It lists them in the following order; “Employed full time”, “Higher/further education”, “Unemployed and seeking work”, and “Looking after the family”. It highlights the increase in the proportion of young adults in higher and further education.

The past 20 years saw an increase in the proportion of young adults, aged 16 to 24, in higher or further education. This increased from 24% of young adults in 1999 to 34% in 2019.

In 1999, 37% of young adults were employed full-time. In 2019 this decreased to 32%. The proportion of young adults that were unemployed and seeking work remained stable, from 10% in 1999 to 7% in 2019.

The number of young adults that looked after the home or family also remained stable, from 5% of all young adults in 1999 to 3% in 2019.

The proportion of adults aged 60 or over reporting to be permanently retired from work decreased from 80% in 1999 to 77% in 2019

More Single Parents are in Paid Employment in 2019

The proportion of single parents at home looking after the home or the family has decreased from 42% of all single parents in 1999 to 20% in 2019.

At the same time, the proportion of single parents that were employed full-time increased from 15% in 1999 to 25% in 2019. The proportion who were employed part-time increased from 20% in 1999 to 28% in 2019.

In 2019, 8% of single parent households reported to be self-employed, increasing from 2% in 1999.

This line graph shows the main forms of economic activity among single parents from 1999 to 2019. Starting with the most common activity in 2019, it shows the proportion of single parents who were “employed part time”, “employed full time”, “looking after the home or the family” and “self-employed”. It highlights the decrease in single parents looking after the home or family.

The proportion of single parents in paid employment increased from 38% in 1999 to 61% in 2019


Contact

Email: shs@gov.scot