Publication - Statistics

Scottish shellfish farm production survey 2017

Published: 31 May 2018
Directorate:
Marine Scotland Directorate
Part of:
Marine and fisheries
ISBN:
9781788518703

This report is based on the returns of an annual survey questionnaire sent to all active authorised shellfish farming businesses in Scotland.

31 page PDF

2.4 MB

31 page PDF

2.4 MB

Contents
Scottish shellfish farm production survey 2017
Production

31 page PDF

2.4 MB

Production

The survey indicates that the shellfish species cultivated in Scottish waters in 2017 were:

Mussel: Mytilus spp.
Pacific oyster: Crassostrea gigas [1]
Native oyster: Ostrea edulis
Queen scallop: Aequipecten opercularis
Scallop: Pecten maximus

Production was dominated by mussel and Pacific oyster, although small quantities of scallop, queen scallop (queen) and native oyster were also produced. The 2017 production data for each species by region are given in Table 1. Additionally in 2017 there was cultivation of whiteleg shrimp ( Litopenaeus vannamei) and common periwinkle ( Littorina littorea) however due to the small number of these species being produced it is not possible to summarise these without revealing commercially sensitive information.

Table 1 - Scottish Shellfish Production by Region, 2017.

Region Businesses Mussel
(tonnes)
Pacific oyster
(000s)
Native oyster
(000s)
Queen
(000s)
Scallop
(000s)
Tonnes Table Tonnes on-growing 000s Table 000s on-growing 000s Table 000s on-growing 000s Table 000s on-growing 000s Table 000s on-growing
Highland 48 558 0 1,799 3,600 0 0 1 0 43 4
Orkney 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Shetland 23 6,647 3,314 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Strathclyde 45 631 1,123 3,086 249 200 481 272 300 4 5
Western Isles 14 396 0 149 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
All Scotland 132 8,232 4,437 5,034 3,849 200 481 273 300 47 9
Weight (Tonnes) 8,232 4,437 403 16 11 6

NB: This report lists regions with active shellfish farms operated by authorised aquaculture production businesses.

Conversion to weight used the following assumptions (based on industry figures): individual oysters averaged 80g; individual scallops averaged 120g; individual queens averaged 40g.

Table = Sales directly for human consumption;
On-growing = Sales to other businesses for on-growing.

Table production by species is illustrated in Figure 1, while trends in production for the table market and on-growing in Scotland are presented in Table 2.

Table 2 - Trends in Production Data for the Table and on-growing 2008-2017.

For the table 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 %change 16-17
Pacific oyster (000s) 3,093 2,900 3,008 3,136 2,706 1,891 3,392 2,693 3,534 5,034 42
Native oyster (000s) 250 490 350 350 317 260 242 200 201 200 -0.5
Queen (000s) 687 138 184 27 9 33 18 33 155 273 76
Scallop (000s) 15 35 64 78 58 40 48 30 35 47 34
Mussel (tonnes) 5,869 6,302 7,199 6,996 6,277 6,757 7,683 7,270 7,732 8,232 6
For on-growing 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017
Pacific oyster (000s) 26 45 1,633 1,400 3,190 6,216 6,792 5,864 4,584 3,849
Native oyster (000s) 0 0 300 1 677 1,015 749 13 323 481
Queen (000s) 0 30 0 0 0 1,490 500 900 17 300
Scallop (000s) 0 0 0 104 16 1,470 136 49 23 9
Mussel (tonnes) 30 391 175 282 309 1,281 1,263 1,841 2,619 4,437

Mussel production, for the table, increased by 6% in 2017 ( see figure 1) to 8,232 tonnes. This is the highest level of mussel production recorded in Scotland. The greatest contribution in regional mussel production was from Shetland, accounting for 6,647 tonnes or 81% of Scotland's total. There was a 69% increase in the production of mussels for on-growing in 2017. This was largely due to increased exports of part grown mussels to Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland. Pacific oyster production increased by 42% from 2016. The Strathclyde region produced 61% of Scotland's farmed Pacific oysters. Queen scallop production increased by 76% since 2016 and the production of farmed scallops increased by 34%, both these sectors continue to target small niche markets. Production of native oysters decreased by 0.5% from 2016. Native oyster production accounts for a small percentage of total oyster production, however, demand for this species continues to be high. Historical data for all shellfish species show that production levels vary year on year, this can be due to a number of different factors such as poor spat fall, algal toxins, poor growth, adverse weather and fluctuations in market prices.

Figure 1 - Table Production by Species 2008-2017.
Figure 1 - Table Production by Species 2008-2017.

Prices of farmed shellfish fluctuated throughout the year. Their value at first sale was estimated from the following figures obtained from the shellfish farming industry. These vary with demand, level of production and geographical area of origin. The average price of Pacific oyster was £0.40 per shell; native oyster, £0.60 per shell; scallop, £1.84 per shell; queen scallop, £0.12 per shell and mussel £1,226 per tonne. The value of the table trade is estimated from the production figures shown in Table 1.

Mussel: £10.1 million
Native oyster: £0.12 million
Queen: £0.03 million
Pacific oyster: £2.01 million
Scallop: £0.09 million

In 2017, the total value at first sale for all species was calculated at approximately £12.4 million, an increase of 6% from the £11.7 million estimated in 2016.


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