Publication - Advice and guidance

Plant Health Guide: guidance for importers

Published: 16 Nov 2009
Directorate:
Agriculture and Rural Economy Directorate
Part of:
Farming and rural
ISBN:
9780755981953

The guide summarises the plant health controls which apply to the import into Scotland of plants, seeds, plant products, plant pests, soil and growing medium from countries outside the European Union.

40 page PDF

170.8 kB

40 page PDF

170.8 kB

Contents
Plant Health Guide: guidance for importers
INTRODUCTION

40 page PDF

170.8 kB

INTRODUCTION

1. This guide summarises the plant health controls which apply to the import into Scotland of plants 1 , seeds, plant products 1 , plant pests 1 , soil and growing medium from countries outside the European Union ( EU). The controls are laid down in the Plant Health Directive 2 and are intended to reduce the risk to commercial crop production and the environment from the introduction of plant pests and diseases. For plant health purposes, most imports from Switzerland are treated in the same way as those from other EU Member States. For guidance on the import of plants, plant products, plant pests or soil and growing medium from Switzerland see Appendix A .

2. Although similar controls apply to the whole of the UK, this guide relates to the import of material into Scotland only. Contact the Food and Environment Research Agency (Fera) for England and Wales, or the Department of Agriculture and Rural Development ( DARDNI) for Northern Ireland (see Appendix B for contact details). Controls on imports of forest plants and products are implemented by the Forestry Commission Inspectors (although some inspection work is delegated to the Scottish Government and Fera).

3. The controls are implemented in Scotland by the Plant Health (Scotland) Order 2005 (as amended) 3 and the Plant Health ( Phytophthora ramorum) (Scotland) Order 2004 (as amended) 4 . Copies of each Order and their amendments can be purchased from the Stationery Office (see Appendix B for contact details), or viewed on-line at: http://www.opsi.gov.uk/legislation/about_legislation

4. The Orders are implemented in Scotland by officers belonging to the Horticulture and Marketing Unit ( HMU) which forms part of the Scottish Government's Rural Payments and Inspections Directorate ( SGRPID).

5. It is important to read all parts of this guide before attempting to import any plants or plant products. It is the responsibility of anyone intending to import such material to ensure that it complies with all relevant requirements. If you are in doubt, or wish to check current restrictions, contact HMU, or if appropriate Fera or DARDNI (see Appendix B for contact details). This guide is intended as a summary only and should not be used as a substitute for the text of the Orders.

6. This guide does not cover movements of plants, seeds and plant products within the EU, some of which may require a plant passport. For further details see The Plant Health Grower's Guide to Plant Passporting and Marketing Requirements, available on-line at: http://www.scotland.gov.uk/publications/plant-health-guide-plant-passporting-marketing-requirements/, or from HMU (see Appendix B for contact details).

7. Imports of certain forest trees, wood, bark and some wood products are subject to legislation implemented by the Forestry Commission (see Appendix B for contact details).

8. Material will fall into one of the following categories based on the risk it has of introducing pests and diseases:

  • Prohibited: Poses such a serious risk that import is only permitted under authority of a licence issued by HMU, Science and Advice for Scottish Agriculture ( SASA), or the Forestry Commissioners. Includes many species of rooted plants and trees from outside Europe.
  • Controlled: Normally requires a phytosanitary certificate issued by the plant protection service of the exporting country. Includes those cuttings, rooted plants and trees that are not prohibited, bulbs, most fruits, certain seeds and some cut flowers.
  • Unrestricted: Presents little or no risk and is not subject to plant health controls. Includes nearly all flower seeds, some cut flowers and fruit and most vegetables for eating (except potatoes).