Information

Cyanobacteria (Blue-Green Algae) in Inland and Inshore Waters: Assessment and Minimisation of Risks to Public Health

Guidance to Directors of Public

Health, to Heads of Environmental Health in Local Authorities (LAs), and to others in

Scotland, on possible risks to public health of cyanobacteria (blue-green algae) in inland

and inshore waters. It updates previous guidance under the same title that was published

by the Scottish Government Health Directorate previously in 2002, and revised in 2007.


ANNEX F

SUGGESTED TEMPLATES FOR RISK ASSESSMENTS

Proactive assessment of the risk to public health

of high concentrations of blue-green algae.

Name of water: High Loch Map reference: X10 Y10

Owner: The Local Authority (Leased to Hightown Angling Association)

Occurrence

Typical pattern of frequency and occurrence of algal blooms:

Typically one algal bloom occurs most (but not all) years usually in late August or September. The intensity varies greatly but the typical duration would be less than two weeks.

Occurrence category: 2

Usage

How is the waterbody used?

Neither the loch nor any of its incoming or outgoing streams is used as a source of public or private drinking water. There is a path around the loch that is used by anglers and walkers (often with dogs). Cattle drink from the loch and its associated streams. The local canoe club uses the loch about three times each year always in summer.

Risk category: Medium to high

Monitoring and control of risks.

Blooms tend to be short-term and are likely to be missed by a planned monitoring programme. No planned inspection or monitoring programme will be undertaken. The local angling association (AA) and the canoe club have both been advised of the risks and provided with leaflets. They have undertaken to advise the local authority of the appearance blooms. A reactive risk assessment will then consider the need for reactive inspection and/or monitoring. Warning signs are kept in the AA hut and will be placed by the AA at pre-defined locations when a bloom appears. Further interventions will be considered in the reactive risk assessment.

Signed John Smith Date 01/01/01

Print name John Smith. Senior EHO

Reactive assessment of the risk to public health of high concentrations of blue-green algae.

Name of water: High Loch Map reference: X10 Y10

Owner: Hightown Angling Association

Usage.

How is the waterbody used?

Neither the loch nor any of its incoming or outgoing streams is used as a source of public or private drinking water. There is a path around the loch that is used by anglers and walkers (often with dogs). Cattle drink from the loch and its associated streams. The local canoe club uses the loch about three times each year always in summer.

Risk category: Medium to high

Recognition

How and when was the bloom detected and reported?

The local authority was informed of the appearance of a bloom by Mr J Jones of the Hightown Angling Association by telephone on 26/8/02.

Health effects

Have any animal or human health effects been reported? Yes/No

If yes please specify.

Actions

What actions have been taken to date?

Warning signs have been placed by the local Angling Association at pre-defined locations. The regional EHO has inspected the loch and has sent water samples to SEPA for analysis. The local farmer has been advised to move cattle from an adjacent field which provides access to water from the loch, until further notice. The canoe club has been informed.

What further actions are planned?

A further inspection will be carried out on 7/9/02.

Signed John Smith Date 29/08/02

Print name John Smith. Senior EHO.

Contact

Email: Janet Sneddon

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