Publication - Advice and guidance

Coronavirus (COVID-19): Scotland's route map - what you can and cannot do

Information about easing the coronavirus lockdown restrictions.

Contents
Coronavirus (COVID-19): Scotland's route map - what you can and cannot do
Seeing friends and family

Seeing friends and family

How many people from other households can I meet outdoors?

From 10 July people can meet in groups of up to 15 people outdoors, from up to 5 different households, including your own household. We are still advising people to stick to 2 metre distancing from people in households other than your own. You should not meet with people from any more than 4 different households in total in any single day, whether indoors or outdoors. You must follow physical distancing guidance and hygiene rules.

What about meeting people from other households indoors?

From 10 July limited indoor gatherings will also be permitted. A maximum of 8 people, from up to 3 different households can meet indoors. That comprises the household whose house the gathering is in and people from two additional households. We know that some individual households comprise more than 8 people, but it is nevertheless important to restrict the number of people meeting within enclosed spaces, which is why we are advising that only 8 people should meet at a time. As long as physical distancing between different households is maintained, this can include overnight stays. Individuals from different households are advised to keep 2 metres apart, be careful to clean surfaces if you touch them and wash your hands regularly, including when you enter someone’s house. You should not meet with people from any more than 4 different households in total in any single day, whether indoors or outdoors.

Are these rules the same for children?

No – see the answers below for the rules applying to children.

What do you mean by ‘household’?

By household we’re talking about people who live in the same home during lockdown. So a household can be one person living on their own, flatmates, or a family living in the same house. What’s important is that it’s always the same people and the same house. An extended household under the revised rules is counted as one household.

Are people allowed to travel to meet friends and family outside?

There is no restriction on travel within Scotland as long as individuals are acting in line with all other guidance that supports the route map.

What about an individual who is shielding – what changes apply to them?

From 10 July those shielding will no longer need to physically distance from people they live with. From that date, they can meet in groups of up to eight people from three other households outdoors every day, as long as strict hand hygiene and physical distancing advice is followed. Those who have been advised to shield will also be able to travel further than 5 miles from their house, book places to stay, such as self-catering accommodation without shared facilities and use toilets in other people’s houses if they are meeting them outdoors. Those currently shielding can also form a ‘extended household group’ with one other household if they live on their own or with children under the age of 18 – this means that the shielding group can visit one other household indoors and stay overnight without physical distancing. Read more about shielding.

My parent is in a care home – when can I see him/her?

Care home residents will be able to receive visitors outside from 3 July, provided their home meets strict criteria, with infection control measures remaining in place.

Guidance was published on 25 June outlining a phased return to visiting starting with a single nominated visitor outdoors. Until now only essential visits, including for end of life situations, have been permitted and these should continue to be supported. The guidance builds up to a fourth and final phase of reintroduction which will include controlled indoor visits and wider use of communal areas by residents, with appropriate measures still being observed. A care home will only be able to permit visiting if they have been COVID-free throughout the pandemic or if all affected residents have fully recovered and no residents have had symptoms for 28 days. When the scientific advice states that it is safe to do so, we can then gradually open up further visiting options. We hope to be able to offer further updates in the coming weeks in order to reconnect even more loved ones.

What are the rules for children aged 11 and under meeting up?

Children aged 0-11 may meet outdoors with members of up to four households at a time without the children following physical distancing. From 10 July, they can do this as many times a day as they wish. Where adults are accompanying them, the limits on those adults meeting with adults from other households still apply.

From 10 July children can meet up with up two households indoors without physical distancing. Children are not required to be physically distant from adults from other households who are not shielding. It remains the responsibility of the adult to manage their own distancing. Outdoors, children aged 0-11 should not meet in groups larger than 15 people in total at a time and indoors they should not meet in groups larger than eight at a time.

What are the rules for children aged 12 and over meeting up?

Young people aged 12-17 may meet outdoors with up to four other households at a time, and should continue to physically distance from others aged 12 or over. They should not meet in groups larger than 15 people in total at a time. Indoors they can meet with up to 8 people from three households at a time, but there is no limit to the number of overall households that they can meet in one day. This means that young people should be able to meet, safely,  those of their choosing separately from meetings that other members of their household may be having. Where adults are accompanying them, the limits on those adults meeting with adults from other households still apply.


First published: 14 Jul 2020 Last updated: 28 Jul 2020 -