Publication - Advice and guidance

Coronavirus (COVID-19): safer public spaces - updated guidance

Guidance focused on design principles for safer urban centres and green spaces in Scotland during the coronavirus crisis. It contains information and examples of interventions that may be undertaken by owners and operators of public spaces to keep people safe.

63 page PDF

12.2 MB

63 page PDF

12.2 MB

Contents
Coronavirus (COVID-19): safer public spaces - updated guidance
8. Appendix

63 page PDF

12.2 MB

8. Appendix

8.1 Where to obtain further information

Coronavirus in Scotland: Scottish Government information and support

Here you will find a range of information and support relating to:-

  • Coronavirus (COVID-19) cases in Scotland
  • Protecting yourself and others
  • Health and wellbeing
  • Getting tested for coronavirus
  • Healthworkers carers and social work
  • Housing and accommodation
  • Schools, education, children and young people
  • Sport and Leisure Facilities
  • Businesses and self-employed people
  • Work and financial support
  • Offer help
  • Funeral, burial and cremation
  • Animal owners
  • Travel
  • Scottish Government approach and strategy

This includes specific guidance on:-

Shielding support and contacts

Test and Protect

Face Coverings

Re-opening Schools Coronavirus (COVID-19): guidance on preparing for the start of the new school term in August 2020

8.2 Safer Places Guidance Documents

Sustrans' design guidance This guidance is to inform and enable statutory bodies implementing temporary infrastructure in Scotland during COVID-19. Content will be regularly reviewed and updated by Sustrans Scotland.

Coronavirus (COVID-19): retail sector guidance: This guidance for the retail sector in Scotland includes procedures for staff and customer safety and an operations checklist.

Coronavirus (COVID-19): guidance on sport and leisure facilities: Guidance for the opening of indoor and outdoor sport and leisure facilities with physical distancing and hygiene measures.

8.3 Security Guidance

Staying secure during Coronavirus: Centre for the Protection of National Infrastructure

Risk to pedestrians during COVID-19: Centre for the Protection of National Infrastructure

8.4 Transport Scotland Guidance

Coronavirus (COVID-19): Advice on how to travel safely: This guidance contains advice on how to be safe when walking, wheeling (wheeling refers to travelling by wheelchair), cycling, or travelling in private vehicles or on public transport during the coronavirus (COVID-19) outbreak in Scotland.

Coronavirus (COVID-19) Guidance on Temporary Traffic Regulation Orders and Notices

Coronavirus (COVID-19): A guide for transport operators in Scotland to keep their staff and those using their services safe

Mobility and Access Committee for Scotland (MACS): MACS gives Scottish Ministers advice on aspects of policy, legislation and practice affecting the travel needs of disabled people.

Two recent MACS pieces of guidance specifically related to COVID-19 are:-

Designing Streets is the policy for how streets should be designed in Scotland

8.5 Guidance for the safe use of places of worship

Guidance for the safe use of places of worship

8.6 Additional relevant external information

NHS inform general advice

Access Panel Network Access Panels work in their areas to address access issues in the built environment. They also work towards improving social inclusion for disabled people and access in the broadest sense. The website provides a network for Access Panels, together with information, support and resources.

Landscape Institute Scotland The Institute has created a digital showcase demonstrating potential design solutions created by its members, supporting longer term climate crisis action and utilising outdoor space to address a number of challenges including:- encouragement of health and well-being activities; safely educating children; moving safely to work, or around more generally; recreation of a social life for communities; and using more of outdoor spaces for the benefit of society and the planet.

greenspace scotland greenspace scotland and The National Lottery Heritage Fund have produced a guide to help local authorities and other greenspace managers manage parks, gardens and greenspaces safely during the coronavirus pandemic.

Guidance from Sustrans on walking and cycling during the coronavirus outbreak

Paths for All Guidance on walking during social distancing

Paths for All Smarter Choices, Smarter Places (SCSP) Open Fund This funding can be used for support for developing rotas, schedules and shift patterns as well as other travel behaviour change projects.

The Scottish Council for Voluntary Organisations (SCVO) Coronavirus Third Sector Information Hub provides information and links to find guidance and funding to help organisations respond to the crisis.

Funding Scotland lists funding sources in Scotland

Northern Ireland IMTAC statement on pop up infrastructure

RNIB advice for LAs in England

The Scottish Outdoor Access Code

The links below provide and demonstrate further examples of opportunities for change:

London Borough of Hammersmith & Fulham

Brighton & Hove City Council

London Borough of Hackney

Leicester City Council

8.7 Checklist: Potential Interventions in your Places

This checklist provides a summary of all the potential interventions in this document that could help you support physical distancing in your places. For speed of checking, all of the points have been split into movement, space, buildings and infrastructure. To quickly understand what changes you should consider, please use the colour coding approach for what you either need to: (1) add to your environment as something new; (2) improve an existing situation; or, (3) remove from a space.

new : i.e. new changes that you may need to make to your places e.g. new signage or markings.

improve : i.e. enhancements that you may need to make to your places e.g. widening footpaths.

remove : i.e. things you will need to take away, or minimise, to help create more space e.g. moving planters

Please use the check list to firstly 'tick' what is relevant to your place and then secondly 'check-off' your completed changes. You can also use the list to monitor outcomes and make further changes to your place, as required. Remember that an EQIA is required under the Public Sector equality duty.

movement i.e. people/traffic management in high streets and town centres

Place

Consideration

Detail

Relevancy

Completed

new

people movement

pedestrian space

signage

Remind pedestrians of distance requirements. This could be through spray markings and signage at entrances and movement intersections.

restaurants/cafes/eateries

Allow restaurants/cafes/ eateries to occupy carriageways/on-street parking bays for external service. A balanced approach to the use of space should be taken in order to maintain appropriate areas for public activities and to ensure any additional seating does not clutter or reduce space for physical distancing and disadvantaging disabled people.

maintenance

Provide additional cleaning regime and maintenance.

pedestrian movement

distance

Maintain 2m (6ft) distancing, if appropriate, for pedestrians.

entry/exits

Provide separate entry and exit routes for pedestrian access with clear signs (i.e. creating one-way directions).

signage

  • Courtesy - Encourage pedestrians to wait and allow others to pass at entryways or along footpaths.
  • Signs on physical distancing and circulation - Particularly at conflict points such as junctions and crossings.
  • Limit queue length - Help manage multiple queues and pedestrian flows.

pedestrian corridor

Aim to have a pedestrian corridor that is free of obstacles with access to dropped kerbs and tactile paving provided where required. This will help disabled people to navigate and maintain physical distancing.

traffic signals

Alterations to traffic signal times and phases to give greater priority to pedestrians.

unobstructed routes

A clear, unobstructed route should be maintained for pedestrians on existing footways, with particular consideration given to the requirements of those with wheeling and mobility needs, visual impairment or other disabilities. The need for special consideration with regard to avoiding negative impacts upon disabled people also applies to the provision of external restaurant service.

queuing

needs of different groups

Consider the needs of individuals with disabilities and older people who may not be able to stand for long in the provision for queuing.

defined areas

Create defined areas to indicate where pedestrians should stand when queuing using spray markings or temporary barriers.

management of multiple queues

  • Different businesses - Where there are different businesses adjacent to each other, clear signage and marshals should be used, as appropriate.
  • Space - Allow space where multiple queues meet.

"Do not join the queue" signs

Provide at popular destinations, when capacity reached.

marshals

Consider the use of marshals to help manage queues and pedestrian flows.

bus stops

Provide signs reminding users to physically distance at bus stop waiting areas.

collaborate

Work with your local authority or landlord to take into account the impact of your queues or other processes on public spaces such as high streets and public car parks.

transport movement

traffic management

traffic lanes

These could be either be (1) closed (2) made one way or (3) completely pedestrianised. Links to further guidance can be found in the Appendix.

temporary parking areas

Depending on circumstances, it may be advantageous for temporary car parking areas to be located at the edge of town centres and busy areas. This may help to disperse traffic from busy areas, reduce the impact of the loss of car parking due to footway enlargement, and allow the prioritisation of car parking for disabled people within town centres.

delivery times

Phase delivery timings in loading bays.

new road layouts

Provide signage to inform pedestrians and road users of changes to road layouts.

cycleways

Introduce new cycleways and temporary bike parking.

safety

Ensure appropriate safety measures are in place for clear segregation between traffic lanes, cycleways and pedestrian footways.

transport hubs

  • Develop a zonal plan for station hubs, highlighting destinations, conflict zones and desire lines.
  • Provide queue marking indicators and barriers outside main entrance.
  • Allow space where multiple queues meet.
  • Identify waiting zones.
  • Provide signs on physical distancing and circulation.
  • Taxi, bus, cycle and pick-up to have waiting zones with identified routes through.
  • Consider reallocation of station forecourt to provide more space for interchange.
  • Consider appointment of marshals to help manage the flow of people into, and out of, transport hubs.

pedestrianisation

Pedestrianise and consider impact on traffic movement.

improve

people movement

pedestrian space

widen footways

Widen to accommodate distancing between pedestrians, including the use of temporary barriers in the carriageway; changes to parking bays, loading bays and relocating cycle lanes.

pedestrian movement

access

Maximise/enlarge access to entry and exit routes to minimise queues.

transport movement

traffic management

people with disabilities

The impact of measures on people with disabilities and other groups needs to be kept under consideration. This includes access for blue badge holders and may call for a balanced approach.

deliveries/street works

Consider the need for delivery access and essential access for street works and maintenance.

parking

Consider car parking layout and spacing, reducing capacity if appropriate.

crossings

Ensure safe, level crossing points.

seating

Ensure seating areas for the disabled and older people.

use existing street furniture

Use existing street furniture (e.g. lamp-posts) for signage to avoid impacting on pedestrian flows.

transport hubs

Maximise access and introduce one-way entry and exit points.

remove

people movement

pedestrian space

street clutter

Remove or relocate unnecessary obstacles, for example planters, and add markings/tape on seating to maintain physical distancing.

pedestrian movement

bus stops/shelters

Move bus stops/shelters to areas which can accommodate queuing in line with physical distancing requirements.

transport movement

traffic management

parking layout

Consider car parking layout and spacing, reducing capacity if appropriate.

on street parking

Potential to suspend on-street parking to facilitate other measures whilst taking account of any accessible parking bay needs.

pinch points

Minimise pinch points, whilst taking into consideration security and the needs of the disabled and older people.

traffic speeds

Reduce traffic speeds using traffic calming measures.

space i.e. green spaces

Place

Consideration

Detail

Relevancy

Completed

new

Pedestrian space

signage

Place signs on physical distancing and circulation, particularly at entrances and conflict points, such as junctions & crossings.

queue markings

Show queue marking indicators at main entrance, popular park destinations and toilets.

marshals

Marshals to help manage queues & pedestrian flows.

pedestrian, cycle and wheeled movement

one way

One-way movement of pedestrians to maintain 2m (6ft) distancing.

signage

Signage to encourage pedestrians to wait/step aside to allow others to pass at entryways or along footpaths.

entry and exits

Provide separate entry and exit routes for pedestrian access with clear signs.

queuing

defined areas

Create defined areas to indicate where pedestrians should stand when queuing, using spray markings or temporary barriers.

"Do not join the queue" signs

Provide at popular destinations, when capacity reached.

traffic management

traffic lanes

These could be either be (1) closed (2) made one-way or (3) completely pedestrianised.

improve

pedestrian space

footway widening

  • Within parks - Accommodate distancing between pedestrians, including through the use of temporary barriers, changes to parking bays, and cycle lanes. This may include the use of grassed areas adjacent to existing paths to increase circulation space and requires appropriate maintenance of all accessible areas. Ensure that these are accessible for wheelchair users and those with pushchairs.
  • On approach streets - To main entrance of parks.

street furniture

Use existing street furniture for signage to avoid impacting on pedestrian flows.

seating

Add markings/tape on seating to maintain physical distancing.

maintenance

Provide additional cleaning regime and maintenance.

pedestrian, cycle and wheeled movement

entry and exits

Enlarge entrances and exits to minimise queues.

crossings

Ensure safe level crossing points to access park.

traffic management

deliveries

Consider the need for delivery access and timing. Plus, essential access for street works and maintenance, taking into account noise/disturbance issues for local residents, where possible.

remove

pedestrian space

planters

Remove unnecessary obstacles, for example planters, and add markings/tape on seating to maintain physical distancing.

traffic management

parking

  • Layouts - Consider car parking layouts and spacing, reducing capacity as appropriate.
  • On street - On street parking could be suspended to facilitate other measures.

traffic speed

Reduce traffic speed around parks.

pinch points

Minimise pinch points, whilst taking into consideration security and the needs of the disabled and older people.

buildings i.e. retail (semi-enclosed/enclosed) and commercial areas

Place

Consideration

Detail

Relevancy

Completed

new

retail/ commercial areas and buildings

building frontages

Provide queue marking indicators on pedestrian areas, focusing queues along the building frontage, where appropriate.

building entrances

Keep building entrances and footpaths clear, whilst taking account of the needs of the disabled, older people and security considerations.

phasing

  • Phase access and opening times.

queue markings

  • Place queue marking indicators and barriers outside main entrance.
  • Provide queue markings for street stalls.
  • Provide queue marking indicators outside office entrances.

one way

Create one-way circulation for street markets.

deliveries

Phase delivery timings in loading bays.

waiting zones

Identify waiting zones.

signage

  • Provide signs and information at widened entry and exit points for markets.
  • Provide signs on physical distancing and circulation.
  • Provide signs to limit queue length.

public toilets

Provide signs at public toilets for queuing, physical distancing and automatic sanitising. Toilets should only open with careful risk management and mitigations to reduce the risk of transmission of COVID-19.

outdoor markets

Outdoor markets should be planned and set-up to allow for 2m (6ft) physical distancing, spacing between stalls, queuing and the safe flow of people along with appropriate hygiene measures.

improve

retail/ commercial areas & buildings

access

Maximise access and introduce one-way entry and exit points.

forecourt space

Consider relocation of station forecourt to provide more space for interchange.

footways

Widen footways by utilising the carriageway.

infrastructure i.e. digital connections

Place

Consideration

Detail

Relevancy

Completed

new

digital

digital tools

Owners/operators may want to consider the use of data and digital tools to make it easier for people to maintain physical distancing. Plus, to aid decision-making regarding the management and modification of spaces.

availability of data

Consider making data available that shows the current footfall of spaces, especially those places that are prone to overcrowding. Access to data and digital tools will allow people to more effectively plan their journeys and choose alternative spaces, or use spaces, at other times of day.

monitoring use of spaces

Owners/operators should consider using data and digital tools to monitor the usage of spaces, and to make modifications to the access (and use of those spaces) as required.

Plan for changing uses

Data and digital tools may be needed to anticipate and plan for the changing use of public places over time. They can also be used to predict and mitigate the potential for overcrowding at certain sites during peak usage times. Necessary corrective measures can be taken to make it easier for people to physically distance.

inclusive and accessible formats

The communication of information relating to changes in transport and infrastructure needs to be in an inclusive and accessible format and widely circulated. Disability Equality Scotland hosts both the inclusive communication hub which shares information on accessible information, and the Accessible Travel Hub that has been liaising with providers to ensure the latest travel information is available for disabled travellers.

improve

e-booking systems

Consider how existing e-booking systems can be utilised to support the effective capacity management of public spaces, such as outdoor sports courts and provide key guidance for usage.

Helpful notes

Temporary signage

Owners/operators are advised to provide clear and concise information to the public on how to adhere to physical distancing. Note: Must use simple, clear and accessible images and messaging to explain guidelines, with consideration for groups where their first language may not be English or where alternative formats may be required.

Security considerations

Security considerations and the impact of measures on people with disabilities and other groups, need to be kept under consideration. This includes access for blue badge holders and may call for a balanced approach.

Safety advice

Emphasise the latest Scottish Government advice on safety procedures and carefully consider physical distancing guidelines in public places. This could include:

  • Showing the maximum number of people who can queue safely (accounting for physical distancing).
  • Signs and announcements about safe travel and maintaining physical distancing. Signs should be placed strategically to maximise impact.
  • Information on changes for disabled users and how they can continue to access public places in a safe way.
  • Providing marshals in the busiest areas.
  • Marking appropriate spaces for queuing, accounting for queues and space required by neighbouring premises whilst taking security considerations into account.

Designing Places

All considerations in the checklist work with the 6 Qualities of what makes a successful place. They are: distinctive, safe and pleasant, welcoming, adaptable, resource efficient and easy to move around.


Contact

Email: chief.planner@gov.scot