Publication - Report

Goose management policy in Scotland: 2010 review

Published: 23 Feb 2011
Directorate:
Environment and Forestry Directorate
Part of:
Environment and climate change
ISBN:
9780755999798

Review of goose management policy in Scotland conducted in 2010.

304 page PDF

0 B

304 page PDF

0 B

Contents
Goose management policy in Scotland: 2010 review
12 Appendix C: Interaction between goose policy and wider biodiversity policy in Scotland

304 page PDF

0 B

12 Appendix C: Interaction between goose policy and wider biodiversity policy in Scotland

The UK Biodiversity Action Plan process

The UK Biodiversity Action Plan ( UKBAP) is the UK Government's response to the Convention on Biological Diversity (1993; see www.cbd.int/convention) and was first published in 1994. As part of UKBAP, action plans for the most threatened species and habitats (Species Action Plans ( SAP) and Habitat Action Plans ( HAP)) are drawn up to outline the status of each species and the main threats faced. The plans outline key objectives and a number of associated targets, which are designed to help achieve recovery of these priority species and habitats and monitor delivery success.

At present there are 65 priority habitats and 1151 priority species at the UK level. UKHAPs are unlikely to be directly relevant to geese due to the lack of targeting actions. Therefore, although some of these habitats (e.g. machair, coastal salt marsh, seagrass beds, coastal and floodplain grazing marsh) may support populations of geese, management is not aimed to benefit geese specifically. There are three priority goose species at the UK level (Biodiversity reporting and information group, 2007): the European (Greater) White-fronted Goose, the Greenland (Greater) White-fronted Goose and Dark-bellied Brent Goose, although only the former has a UKSAP to date (see Table C1). UKBAP has only limited scope to deliver benefits for Scottish goose populations, either directly through the SAP (for Greenland Whitefront) or indirectly through HAPs.

Local Biodiversity Action Plans

In addition to UKBAPS, there are around 150 Local Biodiversity Action Plans ( LBAPs), operate at the county or local authority scale. These include action plans for UK priority species or habitats at the local scale, or alternatively for species or habitats that are of local importance or interest. As for UKBAPS, they also include the generation of HAPs and SAPs.

LBAPs are generally underpinned by the formation of a partnership of interested organisations, including local government, non-governmental organisations and local communities who collectively decide upon local priorities. These local priorities do not have to confirm to set guidelines and usually reflect the interests of organisations who make up the partnership. Each individual plan has a lead partner who is responsible for the implementation of the objectives and relevant targets.

Scotland is broken down into 32 local authority areas, of which a total of 26 have LBAPs. Three of these have HAPs that mention specifically species of geese supported by these particular habitats, and include Greenland Barnacle, Greenland White-fronted, Greylag and Pink-footed Goose (see Table C2). As for UKHAPs, there are no specific targeting actions for geese however.

Three Scottish LBAPS have written SAPs for the following species of geese: Greenland Barnacle, Greenland White-fronted and Bean Goose (see Table C3). Objectives vary according to each LBAP but include maintaining the status at a local level and promoting tourism. Reporting on the relative success of targets is unclear however.

Table C1. Objectives of the UKSAP and the SAF for Greenland White- fronted Goose

UKBAP

SAF

1. Produce a revised flyway management plan to confirm the main conservation issues and seek to address each through specific agreements with the relevant states and organisations.

2. Ensure effective measures for managing potential conflict with agriculture (local goose management schemes) are retained and extended as appropriate.

3. Research the implications of climate and land use change on population size, distribution and flyway dynamics.

4. Undertake international research into the decline in breeding populations (i.e. in Greenland).

5. Ensure the protection and management of all internationally important wintering and passage sites in NW Europe, with particular reference to satellite populations, the loss of which would contribute significant range contractions.

6. Remove White-fronted goose from Schedule 2 part 1 of the Wildlife and Countryside Act in Wales.

1. Produce a revised flyway management plan to confirm the main conservation issues and seek to address each through specific agreements with the relevant states and organisations.

2. Manage data and information on Greenland white-fronted goose populations so that they are readily accessible on the World Wide Web.

3. Ensure effective measures for managing potential conflict with agriculture (local goose management schemes) are retained and extended as appropriate.

4. Ensure the protection and management of all internationally important wintering and passage sites in NW Europe, with particular reference to satellite populations, the loss of which would contribute significant range contractions.

5. To implement any Scotland specific actions identified in the finalised Flyway Plan.

6. To ensure that the monitoring programme for staging and wintering white-fronted geese in Scotland, including continued counts, assessment of breeding success and ringing, continues and incorporates recommendations made in the Flyway Plan.

7. To facilitate the undertaking of priority research identified in the Flyway Plan to help inform conservation actions for Greenland white-fronted geese.

8. To undertake communication, interpretation and education needs within Scotland if / as identified in the finalised Flyway Plan.

Table C2. Local Habitat Action Plans that refer specifically to geese

LBAP

HAP

Species

Tayside Biodiversity Action Plan

Standing open water
Mesotrophic lochs

Pink-footed Goose

Tayside Biodiversity Action Plan

Standing open water
Mesotrophic lochs

Greylag Goose

Argyll & Bute Local Biodiversity Action Plan

Improved Grassland

Barnacle Goose

Argyll & Bute Local Biodiversity Action Plan

Improved Grassland

Greenland White-fronted Goose

Clackmannanshire Biodiversity Partnership

Mudflat and saltmarsh

Pink-footed Goose

Table C3. Species which have SAPs under LBAPs

Species

LBAP

Objectives

Targets

Barnacle Goose

Argyll & Bute Local Biodiversity Action Plan

1. Maintain the 'favourable conservation status of the Greenland Barnacle Goose population of Barnacle geese in Argyll and Bute

2. Maintain the current geographical range and population within Argyll and Bute

3. Ensure that Barnacle Geese are promoted together with Greenland White-fronted Geese as a wildlife spectacle and attraction for the winter tourists to Arygll and Bute and particularly to Islay

1. No reduction in the status of the species within the life of the plan

2. More than 70% of the worlds population of Greenland Barnacle Geese wintering in Arygll and Bute distributed at a minimum of 7 key sites.

3. Establish links with the Scottish Tourist Board 'Visit Scotland'.

Barnacle Goose

Dumfries and Galloway Local Species Action Plan

1. Maintain favourable conservation status for the Svalbard Barnacle goose population within Dumfries and Galloway.

2. Continue co-ordinated and collaborative monitoring, research and management of the population

3. Ensure Barnacle goose in included as part of programme to raise awareness of biodiversity, its importance and the need for its conservation in the region

1. Ensure no reduction in the status of species during the lifetime of the plan.

2. Ongoing

3.1 Set up public awareness programme 1999

3.2 Run public awareness programme until 2005

3.3. Audiences: public, relevant special interests group.

Greenland White-fronted Goose

Argyll & Bute Local Biodiversity Action Plan

1. Maintain the 'favourable conservation status of the Greenland White-fronted Goose population of Barnacle geese in Argyll and Bute

2. Maintain the current geographical range and population within Argyll and Bute

3. Ensure that Barnacle Geese are promoted together with Greenland White-fronted Geese as wildlife spectacle and attraction for the winter tourists to Arygll and Bute and particularly to Islay

1. No reduction in the status of the species within the life of the plan

2. More than 50% of the worlds population of Greenland White-fronted Geese wintering in Arygll and Bute distributed at a minimum of 7 key sites.

3. Establish links with the Scottish Tourist Board 'Visit Scotland'.

Bean Goose

Falkirk Area and North Lanarkshire LBAP Bean Goose Action Plan

1. To protect and maintain the population of bean geese wintering in central Scotland by the identification and the maintenance, enhancement and protection of habitats used by the bean geese for feeding loafing and roosting purposes.

2. Minimise potential conflicts between land use and bean geese in the Slamannan Plateau area by ensuring that planners and other decision makers are fully aware of the importance of the site and the requirements of bean geese.

3. Further knowledge of bean goose requirements and behaviour, in particular investigating local movements and behaviour of individual birds and the migration route to Sweden (ongoing).

4. Raise awareness of the bean goose flock to increase local awareness and appreciation of the value and needs of the Slamannan Plateau bean geese.

1.1. Maintain and, where possible, increase the area of habitat favoured by the geese for feeding, loafing and roosting.

1.2. Manage the Fannyside Reserve for Bean Geese (ongoing).

1.3 Minimise disturbance of the bean goose flock caused by recreational use of the area

2.1 Review supplementary planning guidance to be included in North Lanarkshire and Falkirk local Plans

2.3 Bean Group Action Group to continue to liaise with planners and decision makes

3.1 Continue annual monitoring of bird numbers and areas preferred for grazing loafing and roosting (ongoing).

3.2. Follow the migration route back to Sweden by fitting a radio or satellite tracking device to one of the birds

3.3. Achieve a better understanding of roosting and nighttime movements of the flock by using night vision equipment to monitor known sites.

4.1 Identify viewing places where members of the public can view the geese while minimising disturbance.

4.2 Maintain interpretative signs on appropriate footpaths in the bean goose area

4.3 Invite selected individuals on a visit to see the bean goose flock

The Scottish Biodiversity Strategy

The Scottish Biodiversity Strategy ( SBS) is Scotland's response to the Convention on Biological Diversity and its implementation through the UKBAP. It was developed by the Scottish Biodiversity Forum, which is a working partnership of Government, its agencies, sponsored bodies, non-government organisations, businesses, private organisations and individuals. One of the key outputs of the SBS has been the publication of the Scottish Biodiversity List, an inventory of flora, fauna and habitats that are considered to be of principle importance for biodiversity conservation. The publication of the List fulfils the government's obligations under the Nature Conservation (Scotland) Act 2004. Three goose species have been selected for inclusion: Greenland White-fronted, Barnacle and Bean Goose

As a response to the SBS, a strategic approach to species management has been developed by SNH, referred to as the Species Action Framework 56 ( SAF). The SAF identifies 32 species for inclusion on a Species Action List, for which targeted management development should be carried out. The SRDP has been highlighted as been potentially important in contributing to the objectives of some of the species targeted by the Species Action List and therefore plans could help inform those involved with the application process (e.g. for RDC).

In terms of the Species Action List, only the Greenland White-fronted Goose has been named as a species requiring conservation action, and a five year implementation plan running from 2007-2012 is now in effect for this species (see Table C1). The plan has been developed as a partnership between SNH, the Greenland White-fronted Goose Study ( GWGS) and WWT. The objectives are shown in Table C1. Leading on from the objectives are a number of Actions, one of which refers to Local Goose Management Schemes and to ensure that effective measures for managing conflict with agriculture are retained.

There is a UKBAP Habitat Action Plan ( HAP) for machair habitat, for which SNH is the lead partner. Its principal aim is to restore improved machair grassland to traditional mixed management with no over-grazing, with concomitant reductions in stocking levels to avoid over-grazing of machair (and it has targets directed at a staged delivery of this aim 57). A consortium lead by RSPB has obtained EULIFE funding to run a project to address these HAB objectives for Natura sites in the Western Isles ( RSPB 2009a, b).


Contact

Email: Central Enquiries Unit ceu@gov.scot