Publication - Statistics

The Scottish Health Survey 2011 - volume 2: children

Published: 25 Sep 2012
Part of:
Health and social care
ISBN:
9781780458427

Annual report of the Scottish Health Survey for 2011. Volume focussing on child health.

141 page PDF

2.5 MB

141 page PDF

2.5 MB

Contents
The Scottish Health Survey 2011 - volume 2: children
Chapter 3 References and notes

141 page PDF

2.5 MB

Chapter 3 References and notes

1. Scotland's Health - A challenge to us all: The Scottish Diet. Edinburgh: The Scottish Office, 1993. www.healthscotland.com/documents/1181.aspx

2. Gray, L. and Leyland, A. (2009). Chapter 7: Fruit and vegetable consumption. In Bromley, C., Bradshaw, P. and Given, L. [eds.] The 2008 Scottish Health Survey - Volume 1: Main Report. Edinburgh, Scottish Government. <www.scotland.gov.uk/Publications/2009/09/28102003/0>

3. Gray, L. and Leyland, A. (2010). Chapter 7: Diet. In Bromley, C., Given, L. and Ormston, R. [eds.] The 2009 Scottish Health Survey - Volume 1: Main Report. Edinburgh, Scottish Government. http://www.scotland.gov.uk/Publications/2010/09/23154223/0>

4. Eating for Health: a Diet Action Plan for Scotland. Edinburgh: The Scottish Office, 1996.
http://www.scotland.gov.uk/Topics/Health/Healthy-Living/Food-Health/Eating

5. The Scottish Dietary Targets were originally set out in: Eating for Health: a Diet Action Plan for Scotland. Edinburgh: The Scottish Office, 1996. <http://www.scotland.gov.uk/Topics/Health/Healthy-Living/Food-Health/Eating>; and were most recently reaffirmed in: Healthy Eating, Active Living: An action plan to improve diet, increase physical activity and tackle obesity (2008-2011). Edinburgh: Scottish Government, 2008

6. Towards a Healthier Scotland. Edinburgh: The Scottish Executive, 1999.

7. Improving Health in Scotland - the Challenge. Edinburgh: The Scottish Executive, 2003.
www.scotland.gov.uk/Publications/2003/03/16747/19929

8. Hungry for Success - A whole school approach to school meals in Scotland, Edinburgh: The Stationery Office, 2003.

9. Eating for Health - Meeting the Challenge. Edinburgh: The Scottish Executive, 2004.
www.scotland.gov.uk/Publications/2004/07/19624/39995

10. Better Health, Better Care Action Plan. Edinburgh: Scottish Government, 2007.

11. Healthy Eating, Active Living: An action plan to improve diet, increase physical activity and tackle obesity (2008-2011). Edinburgh: Scottish Government, 2008.

12. Preventing Overweight and Obesity in Scotland: A Route Map Towards Healthy Weight. Edinburgh: the Scottish Government, 2010.

13. See: <www.scotland.gov.uk/Topics/Education/Schools/HLivi/schoolmeals>

14. Obesity Route Map: Action Plan - Version 1.0. Edinburgh: Scottish Government, 2011. <www.scotland.gov.uk/Resource/Doc/346007/0115166.pdf>

15. Health Analytical Services Scottish Government and Information and Statistics Division, NHS National Services Scotland. Indicators to Monitor Progress of the Obesity Route Map. Edinburgh: Scottish Government, 2011 <www.scotland.gov.uk/Resource/Doc/346011/0115167.pdf>

16. Health Analytical Services Scottish Government and Information and Statistics Division, NHS National Services Scotland. Indicators to Monitor Progress of the Obesity Route Map. Edinburgh: Scottish Government, 2011 <www.scotland.gov.uk/Resource/Doc/346011/0115167.pdf>

17. Scottish Executive's Expert Panel on School Meals. Hungry for Success: A Whole School Approach to School Meals in Scotland. Edinburgh: HMSO, 2003.

18. Scottish Parliament. Schools (Nutrition and Health Promotion)(Scotland) Act. Edinburgh: HMSO, 2007.

19. Scottish Centre for Social Research. Evaluating the Impact of the 'Big Eat In' - Final Report. Glasgow: GCPH, 2011.

20. Glasgow Centre for Population Health. Exploring the nutritional quality of 'out of school' foods popular with school pupils. Briefing Paper Findings Series No 35. Glasgow: GCPH. 2012

21. Parkinson, J. (2012). Establishing a core set of national, sustainable mental health indicators for children and young people in Scotland: Final report. Glasgow: NHS Health Scotland.

22. Roe, L., Strong, C., Whiteside, C., Neil, A. and Mant, D. (1994). Dietary intervention in primary care: Validity of the DINE method for assessment. Family Practice. 11: 375-81.

23. Fruit and vegetable portions sizes for children are often referred to as the amount a child can hold in their hand. As this will differ from child to child and will vary by age it is not possible to incorporate this into any systematic analysis of children's fruit and vegetable consumption.

24. Hybrid breads were recorded by interviewers as open "other answers" in 2003 and a code was added to the codeframe when the data were edited. From 2008 onwards "Wholemeal/white mixture e.g. 'Best of both'" was an explicit code on the interviewers' screens.

25. For example, if both parents ate five or more portions the parental consumption value matched that of both parents. If one parent consumed more portions than the other the parental consumption matched the highest value of either parent. In households where one parent was interviewed the parental value matched that parent's consumption.


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