Publication - Research and analysis

Lived experience of fuel poverty: research

Qualitative research into the lived experience of fuel poverty in Scotland.

113 page PDF

1.9 MB

113 page PDF

1.9 MB

Contents
Lived experience of fuel poverty: research
Footnotes

113 page PDF

1.9 MB

Footnotes

1 http://www.legislation.gov.uk/asp/2019/10/contents/enacted

2 https://www.lboro.ac.uk/research/crsp/mis/

3 http://www.legislation.gov.uk/ssi/2020/58/introduction/made

4 https://www.gov.scot/publications/scottish-house-condition-survey-2018-key-findings/

5 http://www.legislation.gov.uk/asp/2019/10/contents/enacted

6 The amount of money it would take for an average fuel poor household to no longer be classed as in fuel poverty.

7 https://www.lboro.ac.uk/research/crsp/mis/

8 https://www.gov.scot/publications/scottish-house-condition-survey-2018-key-findings/

9 https://www.gov.scot/publications/scottish-house-condition-survey-2018-key-findings/pages/6/

10 http://www.legislation.gov.uk/ssi/2020/58/introduction/made

11 Policy ideas on how to respond to the needs of those in fuel poverty were developed by Scottish Government and tested as part of the research. The full descriptions are shown in chapter 8 and are included in the discussion guide in Appendix F.

12 https://www.gov.scot/publications/scottish-house-condition-survey-2018-key-findings/pages/6/

13 The SHS is a large multi-purpose survey commissioned by the Scottish Government and undertaken by Ipsos MORI. The social interview is completed with approximately 10,000 households each year collecting a wide range of data on the characteristics, attitudes and behaviour of Scottish households and adults. The follow-up physical survey is completed with around 3,000 of the 10,000 households each year by surveyors trained to collect detailed information on housing characteristics. The result is a unique and powerful data set for examining the condition and characteristics of Scotland’s housing stock alongside the views and experience of the people living in those dwellings.

14 https://www.gov.scot/publications/scottish-house-condition-survey-2018-key-findings/

15 https://simd.scot/#/simd2020/BTTTFTT/9/-4.0000/55.9000/

16 The subjective nature of personal warmth can also be described as ‘thermal comfort’, which is defined by Rupp, et al, 2015 as ' that condition of mind that expresses satisfaction with the thermal environment and is assessed by subjective evaluation'. https://www.gov.scot/publications/new-definition-fuel-poverty-scotland-review-recent-evidence/pages/10/

17 In descriptions of participants’ quotes FP = Fuel Poverty, EFP = Extreme Fuel Poverty and EHR = Enhanced Heating Regime

18 The EPC bands for homes within the sample for this study were: B or C (16), D (17), E, F or G (7). This has been included here to show the general spread across those interviewed and not as an indicator of how EPC bands varied across all households in fuel poverty.

19 The SAP rating is the Standard Assessment Procedure for dwellings, part of the methodology used to calculate EPC rating https://www.gov.scot/publications/energy-performance-certificates-introduction/

20 https://www.gov.scot/publications/fuel-poverty-target-definition-strategy-scotland-bill-fuel-poverty-strategy/

21 https://www.gov.scot/publications/scottish-house-condition-survey-2018-key-findings/

22 https://www.gov.scot/publications/scottish-house-condition-survey-2018-key-findings/

23 https://www.gov.scot/publications/scottish-house-condition-survey-2018-key-findings/pages/6/

24 https://www.gov.uk/guidance/smart-meters-how-they-work

25 https://energysavingtrust.org.uk/home-energy-efficiency/smart-meters


Contact

Email: socialresearch@gov.scot