Publication - Impact assessment

EU single use plastics directive consultation: partial equality impact assessment

This partial equality impact assessment (EQIA) considers potential equality impacts associated with a market restriction on those single-use plastic products included in Article 5 of the EU Directive on the reduction of the impact of certain plastic products on the environment (2019/904).

26 page PDF

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26 page PDF

634.2 kB

Contents
EU single use plastics directive consultation: partial equality impact assessment
Stage 2: Data and Evidence Gathering, Involvement and Consultation

26 page PDF

634.2 kB

Stage 2: Data and Evidence Gathering, Involvement and Consultation

19. This section includes the results of evidence gathering, the framing exercise and a qualitative and quantitative data review. The table details areas where data or evidence indicative of an equality impact has been identified.

Characteristic

Evidence gathered

Source

Data gaps identified and action taken

Age

All items - littering - People aged between 16 to 24 are more likely (35%) to report neighbourhood littering as very common or common, compared to 27% for those aged 60 to 74. The evidence suggests that litter is a social problem that particularly affects young people's perceptions of their own neighbourhood. Measures that could reduce littering, such as market restrictions on single-use plastic items, could reasonably be predicted to have a positive impact on people's sense of neighbourhood generally, and particularly for young people.

Scottish Household Survey, 2017[8]

Evidence gaps likely exist where there is no published information on the impacts. Direct engagement with equalities representatives and targeted engagement events during the consultation will identify more impacts.

We are not aware of further relevant existing evidence at this time on age for the following items: plastic cutlery (forks, knives, spoons, stirrers and chopsticks), plastic plates, food, beverage containers and cups for beverages made of expanded polystyrene, products made from oxo-degradable plastics.

All items - littering - At least 250 million easily visible litter items are cleared by local authorities in Scotland each year.

Scotland's Litter Problem, 2013[9]

Plastic Straws - young children - young children who also have disabilities may be particularly impacted by the removal of plastic straws. 10% of children had a long-term limiting mental or physical health condition or disability in 2017.

Scottish Household Survey, 2017[8]

Plastic Straws - older people - older people may be more likely to suffer from medical conditions and ill health and therefore may be more likely to be impacted by market restrictions on plastic straws. People aged 75 and over are projected to be the fastest growing age group in Scotland. The number of people aged 75 and over is projected to increase by 27% over the next ten years and by 79% over the next 25 years.

Projected Population of Scotland (2016-based)[10]

Plastic Straws - older people: delivery of granular medicines - Straws may be used for pre-dosed granular medicines, or for packaging for powders. A market restriction would therefore disadvantage users of such objects, many of whom are elderly. Straws used for this purpose will therefore be considered exempt.

Summary on proposals to ban the distribution and/or sale of plastic straws, plastic stemmed cotton buds and plastic drink stirrers in England (2019)[11]

Balloon sticks - young children - impacts on enjoyment of parties and events. A respondent suggested that 'A ban would reduce children's pleasure since the balloon is not presented vertically as if it were floating'. However the significance of this way of enjoying a balloon opposed to activities with a stickless balloon was not presented.

Preliminary assessment of the impacts of a potential ban on plastic cutlery, plates plastic balloon sticks, Resource Futures (2018)[12]

Disability

Straws - Muscular Dystrophy UK presented the results of a survey they conducted:

1.) Of the disabled people they surveyed, 43% have a requirement to use straws all the time, and 34% some of the time.

2.) Nearly 77% of those surveyed were against the straw ban. Only 23% were in favour of the straw ban.

Muscular Dystrophy UK (as cited in the Summary on proposals to ban the distribution and/or sale of plastic straws, plastic stemmed cotton buds and plastic drink stirrers in England (2019))[11]

Evidence gaps likely exist where there is no published information on the impacts. Direct engagement with equalities representatives and targeted engagement during the consultation will identify more impacts.

We are not aware of further relevant existing evidence at this time on disability for the following items: Plastic cutlery (forks, knives, spoons, stirrers and chopsticks), balloon sticks, plastic plates, food containers, beverage containers and cups for beverages made of expanded polystyrene, products made from oxo-degradable plastics.

Straws - Medical - Straws are considered essential for a wide range of temporary (following surgery or dental work), and longer-term medical conditions and disabilities. A response from Nestlé UK to the Defra consultation indicated that people with the following conditions could be impacted, although this list should not be considered exhaustive: neurological diseases, people who experience tremors or poor dexterity, dementia, gastro-intestinal issues, cerebral palsy, stroke, dysphagia, spinal injuries, paralysis, and patients recovering from surgery, chemotherapy or radiotherapy. NHS Scotland reports that it uses 3.8 million drinking straws each year (EPECOM Paper 2.2).

Nestlé UK and others, as cited in the Summary on proposals to ban the distribution and/or sale of plastic straws, plastic stemmed cotton buds and plastic drink stirrers in England (2019)[11]

EPECOM Paper 2.2 (2018)[13]

Straws - Independence - the use of plastic straws allows disabled people to maintain a level of independence which could be compromised by the implementation of market restrictions, with direct influence on quality of life.

Nestlé UK and others, as cited in the Summary on proposals to ban the distribution and/or sale of plastic straws, plastic stemmed cotton buds and plastic drink stirrers in England (2019)[11]

Straws - Dignity and Gatekeeping - an exemption for medical-enabling use and other specialist uses could present an unfair burden for disabled users. Concerns were expressed about "gatekeeping", i.e. having to prove a disability. Responses also suggested that there were concerns about indignity related to having to use alternatives to plastic straws (e.g. 'sippy cups').

Summary on proposals to ban the distribution and/or sale of plastic straws, plastic stemmed cotton buds and plastic drink stirrers in England (2019)[11]

Straws - Scale of Impacts - 28% of adults in Scotland have a long-term physical or mental health condition.

In 2011, the proportion of people in Scotland with a long- term activity-limiting health problem or disability was 20% (1,040,000 people), the same proportion as reported in 2001 (1,027,872 people).

In 2017 there were fewer than 40,000 unemployed disabled people but 321,000 disabled people classed as economically inactive

Scottish Household Survey, 2017,[8] 2011 Census,[14] Disabled People Employment Action Plan, 2017[15]

Sex

Evidence gaps likely exist where there is no published information on the impacts. Direct engagement with equalities representatives and targeted engagement events prior to, and during the consultation will identify more impacts.

We are not aware of any relevant existing evidence at this time on sex in relation to the items included in the policy.

Race

Evidence gaps likely exist where there is no published information on the impacts. Direct engagement with equalities representatives and targeted engagement events during the consultation will identify more impacts.

We are not aware of any relevant existing evidence at this time on race in relation to the items included in the policy.

Pregnancy and Maternity

Evidence gaps likely exist where there is no published information on the impacts. Direct engagement with equalities representatives and targeted engagement events during the consultation will identify more impacts.

We are not aware of any relevant existing evidence at this time on pregnancy and maternity in relation to the items included in the policy.

Gender Reassignment

Evidence gaps likely exist where there is no published information on the impacts. Direct engagement with equalities representatives and targeted engagement events during the consultation will identify more impacts.

We are not aware of any relevant existing evidence at this time on gender reassignment in relation to the items included in the policy.

Sexual Orientation

Evidence gaps likely exist where there is no published information on the impacts. Direct engagement with equalities representatives and targeted engagement events during the consultation will identify more impacts.

We are not aware of any relevant existing evidence at this time on sexual orientation in relation to the items included in the policy.

Marriage and Civil Partnership

Evidence gaps likely exist where there is no published information on the impacts. Direct engagement with equalities representatives and targeted engagement events during the consultation will identify more impacts.

We are not aware of any relevant existing evidence at this time on marriage and civil partnerships in relation to the items included in the policy.

Religion or Belief

Evidence gaps likely exist where there is no published information on the impacts. Direct engagement with equalities representatives and targeted engagement events during the consultation will identify more impacts.

We are not aware of any relevant existing evidence at this time on religion or belief in relation to the items included in the policy.


Contact

Email: SUPD@gov.scot