Publication - Form

Adult's Post-Mortem Examination: information

Published: 17 Feb 2004

Information about an Adult's Post-Mortem Examination - more detail about authorisation, the examination, tissue blocks and uses of the medical record.

28 page PDF

107.4 kB

28 page PDF

107.4 kB

Contents
Adult's Post-Mortem Examination: information
Page 0

28 page PDF

107.4 kB

Information about an Adult's Post-Mortem Examination
- more detail about authorisation, the examination,
tissue blocks and uses of the medical record

This document is also available in pdf format (107k)

Summary

1. One copy of the completed form should be given to the nominated representative/ nearest relative, one copy retained in the patient record and a copy given to the pathologist who will perform the post-mortem examination that has been authorised.

2. Information leaflet(s) should also be provided to the nominated representative/ nearest relative, and a note of which version of leaflet was given retained in the patient record.

3. If any part of the authorisation is withdrawn within the time limit agreed, all copies of the form should be amended with the date the authorisations are withdrawn and a clear statement who is amending the record and on what evidence, e.g. letter, telephone conversation, etc.

4. If any procedures or uses of material are envisaged which are not pre-printed on this form, separate authorisation MUST be obtained for these and recorded in section 7.

5. If any extra tissue is to be taken at post-mortem examination for use in research, specific authorisation for this, and for its use in that research project, must be obtained (using a separate form).

Basic Information Leaflet
Further Information Leaflet
Authorisation for a Hospital Post-Mortem Examination on an Adult

Notes
  • The post-mortem examination is an important medical examination to find the cause of a person's death.

  • Ideally the post-mortem examination should take place within a day or two of death.

  • The person's hands and feet are not affected by the post-mortem examination.

  • You should be able to see the body again after the post-mortem examination.

  • The final results of the examination will usually be available in 21 days and a copy is sent to the deceased's general practitioner. Unless the deceased did not wish this, a copy of the report can be requested by the nominated representative/nearest relative.

  • Whole organs will only be kept if this was the deceased person's wish or we have authorisation from the nominated representative/nearest relative.

  • If the nominated representative/nearest relative does not wish a full post-mortem examination, there may be other tests that can be done. This should be discussed with hospital staff.

  • Ask as many questions as you wish.

Support

Age Concern Scotland
Has a number of member groups who provide bereavement counselling for older people.
National Helpline: 0131 220 3345
Website: http:// www.ageconcernscotland.org.uk

Cruse
Offers support to all bereaved people
National helpline: 0870 167 1677
Website: www.crusebereavementcare.org.uk

National Association of Bereavement Services
Provides advice and support to all bereaved people.
National Helpline: 020 7709 9090

National Association of Widows
Offers comfort and support to all widows through its local branches in the UK. Advice and information from its national office.
National Helpline: 0247 663 4848
Website: http://www.widows.uk.net/

Samaritans
Provides confidential emotional support for anyone in crisis.
National Helpline: 0845 790 90 90
Website: www.samaritans.org.uk

Sudden Death Support Association
Offers support to all bereaved people
National Helpline: 0118 988 9797