Publication - Research and analysis

The Experiences of Mothers Aged Under 20: Analysis of Data From the Growing up in Scotland Study

Published: 20 Feb 2014
Part of:
Research
ISBN:
9781784122676

Analysis of Growing Up in Scotland data on the circumstances of first-time mothers in Scotland who were aged under 20 at the time of the child’s birth. Data collected up to the child’s sixth birthday were used to compare these circumstances with those of mothers who were aged 20 to 24 and aged 25 or older at the time of their child’s birth.

92 page PDF

1.1 MB

92 page PDF

1.1 MB

Contents
The Experiences of Mothers Aged Under 20: Analysis of Data From the Growing up in Scotland Study
Footnotes

92 page PDF

1.1 MB

Footnotes

1. Though some small, statistically significant differences are evident.

2. Getting it Right for Every Child http://www.scotland.gov.uk/Topics/People/Young-People/gettingitright/publications

3. Early Years Framework (2009) http://www.scotland.gov.uk/Publications/2009/01/13095148/1

4. Equally Well (2008) http://www.scotland.gov.uk/Resource/Doc/229649/0062206.pdf

5. Achieving Our Potential (2008) http://www.scotland.gov.uk/Publications/2008/11/20103815/6

6. Child Poverty Strategy for Scotland (2011) http://www.scotland.gov.uk/Publications/2011/03/14094421/6

7. Curriculum for Excellence

8. Scottish government press release, 1 April 2012
http://www.scotland.gov.uk/News/Releases/2012/04/opportunities-for-all01042012

9. Post-16 Transitions: Policy and Practice Framework (2012)
http://www.scotland.gov.uk/Resource/0040/00408819.pdf

10. Finance Committee Report on Preventative Spending (2011)
http://www.scottish.parliament.uk/s3/committees/finance/reports-11/fir11-01.htm

11. National Parenting Strategy (2012)
http://www.scotland.gov.uk/Resource/0040/00403769.pdf

12. Mothers recruited into the Lothian FNP had expected birth dates in 2010 and 2011. These birth dates meant they were also eligible for recruitment to the second birth cohort (BC2) of the Growing Up in Scotland study. Attempts were made to incorporate as many FNP mothers into BC2 as possible. However, ethical restrictions placed on the recruitment process requiring an opt-in process made this difficult in practice. The team received contact information for just 37 FNP participants and a successful interview was obtained with only 24 of this group. This makes statistically robust separate analysis of this group impossible. Nevertheless, the wider group of younger mothers involved in GUS BC2 represent the national peer group of FNP mothers and may therefore be considered to be broadly representative of that group.

13. More precisely, at sweep two the cohort children were aged around 22 months - just under 2 years old. The same rule applies at all subsequent sweeps, i.e. at sweep three the child is aged just under three years old and so on.

14. All tables are included in the appendix.

15. More than one response could be given at this question

16. The income that a household needs to attain a given standard of living will depend on its size and composition. For example, a couple with dependent children will need a higher income than a single person with no children to attain the same material living standards. "Equivalisation" means adjusting a household's income for size and composition so that we can look at the incomes of all households on a comparable basis.

17. Note some caution is necessary when applying these trends to younger mothers in the new cohort. The trend data for the first birth cohort represents a period when eligibility for various tax credits and benefits was wider than it is for the second birth cohort. These changes, along with the many other welfare changes which have been, or will soon be, implemented, may see trends in benefit receipt and patterns of employment vary for parents in BC2 compared with BC1.

18. 'Other' arrangements include rent free, co-ownership, shared ownership (partly own and partly rent) and crofting.

19. Area deprivation is measured using the Scottish Index of Multiple Deprivation (SIMD) which identifies small area concentrations of multiple deprivation across Scotland. In this report, the data zones are grouped into quintiles. Quintiles are percentiles which divide a distribution into fifths, i.e., the 20th, 40th, 60th, and 80th percentiles. Those respondents whose postcode falls into the first quintile are said to live in one of the 20% least deprived areas in Scotland. Those whose postcode falls into the fifth quintile are said to live in one of the 20% most deprived areas in Scotland.

20. Note that this analysis assumes that those children born subsequently live, come to live in the same household as the cohort child and are alive at the point of data collection. As such, it will undercount, to some extent, actual subsequent pregnancies and births.

21. To consider this as a measure of 'subsequent live births' assumes that those children who are born then come to live in the same household as the cohort child. This measure does not, therefore, account for children born to the mother who live elsewhere, stillbirths or children who died between birth and the point of data collection.

22. Though some small, statistically significant differences are evident.

23. This report shows higher proportions for attendance at ante-natal classes compared with figures in similar analysis of the same GUS data in Warner (2012) due to the restriction of the analysis here to first-time mothers, amongst whom ante-natal class attendance is known to be higher than amongst mothers on subsequent pregnancies.

24. We may expect that had this been a measure of home visits by a health visitor rather than any form of contact (whether initiated by the mother or the health visitor, at home, by phone or at a clinic) there may have been more variation by age.

25. To consider this as a measure of 'subsequent live births' assumes that those children who are born then come to live in the same household as the cohort child. This measure does not, therefore, account for children born to the mother who live elsewhere, stillbirths or children who died between birth and the point of data collection.


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Email: Liz Levy