Publication - Impact assessment

Coronavirus (COVID-19): events sector guidance: equality and Fairer Scotland impact assessment

This document supports consideration of the impact of the coronavirus events sector guidance on people with protected characteristics.

19 page PDF

503.4 kB

19 page PDF

503.4 kB

Contents
Coronavirus (COVID-19): events sector guidance: equality and Fairer Scotland impact assessment
Equality and Fairer Scotland Impact Assessment - Results

19 page PDF

503.4 kB

Equality and Fairer Scotland Impact Assessment - Results

Title of policy 

COVID-19 Events Sector Guidance  

Summary of aims and desired outcomes of policy  

The guidance is for the events sector, in particular organisers of events. The Guidance came into effect on 3 July 2020 and extends until further notice. 

The Scottish Government is keen to build confidence and create the right environment for supporting safer work and offering advice on keeping event staff and attendees safe, as we continue to live with COVID-19. 

Author of the results EQIA   

This Results Equality and Fairer Scotland Impact Assessment (EQFSIA) has been prepared by the Tourism and Major Events Division of the Scottish Government with input from EventScotland, the events industry, and trade unions.  

Date of publication 

30 September 2020

This EQIA will remain live after publication and will be reviewed as we progress through the route map. 

Updated versions are available on request by contacting majorevents@gov.scot

Executive Summary

This document supports consideration of the impact of the Events Sector Guidance on people with protected characteristics.  

All Scottish Government sectoral guidance is being developed in line with our principles for decision making. These are:-

  • Safe:  We will ensure that transmission of the virus remains suppressed and that our NHS and care services are not overwhelmed.
  • Lawful: We will respect the rule of law which will include ensuring that any restrictions are justified, necessary and proportionate.
  • Evidence-based: We will use the best available evidence and analysis.
  • Fair and ethical: We will uphold the principles of human rights, dignity, autonomy, respect and equality.
  • Clear: We will provide clarity to the public to enable compliance, engagement and accountability.
  • Realistic: We will consider the viability and effectiveness of options.
  • Collective:  We will work with our partners and stakeholders, including the UK Government and other Devolved Nations, ensuring that we meet the specific needs of Scotland.

The Events Sector Guidance is aimed at event organisers and will have an impact on their workforce (broadly defined to include employees, agency staff, contractors/supply chain, competitors, performers, and volunteers).  It will also have an impact on attendees at events (varies by event and may include delegates, ticket-holders, and the general public).

Overall we expect that individuals who have protected characteristics who work at or attend events will benefit directly from the guidance through appropriate risk assessment and implementation of measures to reduce the spread of COVID-19 at events which will allow them to resume safely.

We currently think that the Guidance is likely to have most differential impact on people with protected characteristics relating to age, race, disability and gender.  However, it should be noted that this is a 'live' document which will be regularly reviewed.  

Characteristic

Age

Summary of relevant impact

Older people are more likely to be seriously affected by Covid-19. More than 75% of all deaths in Scotland involving Covid-19 up until 31 May were of people aged 75 or over. Younger people are less likely to be seriously affected by Covid-19 (Disparities in the risk and outcomes of COVID-19).

There is growing evidence that economic consequences of the COVID-19 pandemic are particularly negative for young people.

The Annual Population Survey 2019 found that approximately 51% of the events workforce is under the age of 35 compared to around 35% for Scotland's workforce as a whole. A disproportionately young workforce could result in a heightened risk and impact (in terms of lost lifetime earnings) of unemployment in the industry.

IPSOS – Tracking the Coronavirus Report, Scotland has found that older people (over 55) are more anxious about returning to events than younger people (under 35).

Different age groups may be more or less likely to use certain channels (such as online, digital) than others to access information about events.

Under 5's are exempt from wearing facemasks.

Proposed mitigating actions 

Individual health circumstances and protected characteristics should be considered and discussed with the workforce before prioritising who is asked to return to work and when. This should recognise the protective measures required to minimise health risks to those at risk or shielded workers or those living with those at risk or shielded households, exploring whenever possible how these staff can work from home. Consideration of health circumstances and protected characteristics should be given to this as part of the risk assessment process that is recommended by the guidance.  

Permission should be sought from individuals before collecting any information on health conditions of those within their household.  

Ensure that communication is provided through a range of channels to help ensure that they are accessed by the intended audience for the event. Similarly, ensure that communications with the workforce are provided in a range of ways, workers are able to ask questions, and that workforce representatives are fully involved.

Guidance / Checklist highlights need to consider impact of face coverings and to take into account that certain people, such as under 5's, should not wear face coverings.

Characteristic

Disability

Summary of relevant impact

It is possible that certain measures implemented to mitigate spread of virus may create barriers to disabled people working at or attending events. For example:

  • General guidance not to use lifts (impact of people who use wheelchairs or other who find it difficult to use the stairs).
  • Use of face covering by event staff and / or those attending events (impact on people who lip read or those who cannot wear face masks due to health conditions).
  • Provision of additional handwashing or hand sanitiser in particular locations that are not accessible / not at correct height (impact on those in wheelchairs).
  • Provision of information before and on the day of the event about the measures to reduce spread of coronavirus not available in a range of formats (may exclude those who are reliant on a particular format – e.g. people who are blind or deaf).
  • Facilities being removed or reduced – for example disabled parking spaces removed to allow for queuing or disabled toilets changed to general use to increase capacity.

Proposed mitigating actions 

Event organisers should consider whether any of the measures they are implementing could create additional barriers for disabled people and the focus should be on how to overcome these by making reasonable adjustments:

  • Checklist is clear that lifts can be used when required to ensure accessibility but should not be in general usage.
  • Guidance / Checklist highlights need to consider impact of face coverings and how to engage with those who lip read e.g. consider use of alternative face masks with transparent panels and to take into account that certain people, such as those with asthma, should not wear face coverings (increase awareness that some people might be unable to wear facemasks, consider including information on event communication channels. 
  • Guidance indicates handwashing / sanitising should have sufficient provision at accessible height for all event attendees.
  • Guidance covers provision of accessibility information, including Covid precautions before and at the event and suggests a range of alternative formats to help ensure accessibility.
  • Guidance indicates event organisers should avoid repurposing accessible toilets for general use.
  • Event organisers should avoid repurposing disabled park bays/areas for other uses such as queuing. 
  • Event organisers should provide clear, easily found information on accessibility and how they can get there safely.

Characteristic

Race

Summary of relevant impact

Black, Asian and Minority Ethnic (BAME) people more likely to be seriously affected by COVID-19. Public Health England has found that survival among confirmed COVID-19 cases shows that after accounting for the effect of sex, age, deprivation and region, people of Bangladeshi ethnicity had around twice the risk of death than people of White British ethnicity. People of Chinese, Indian, Pakistani, Other Asian, Caribbean and Other Black ethnicity had between 10 and 50% higher risk of death when compared to White British.

New analysis of deaths registered up to 14th June 2020 shows that deaths among people from the South Asian ethnic group were almost twice as likely to involve COVID-19 than deaths in the White Scottish / British ethnic groups, after accounting for age group, sex, area deprivation and urban/rural classification.

Numerically the largest number of deaths (54) in a minority ethnic community occurred within the white Irish group. More than double the number of deaths (23) in the 2nd largest group, Pakistani.

Proposed mitigating actions 

The guidance sets out that individual health circumstances and protected characteristics should be considered and discussed with the workforce before prioritising who is asked to return to work and when. This should recognise the protective measures required to minimise health risks to those at risk or shielded workers or those living in shielded households, exploring whenever possible how these staff can work from home. Consideration of health circumstances and protected characteristics should be given to this as part of the risk assessment process.  

Permission should be sought from individuals before collecting any information on health conditions of those within their household.  

For example, given that there is some evidence which suggests that Covid-19 may impact disproportionately on some groups (Minority Ethnic communities), employers should ensure that Occupational Health Service provide practical support to Minority Ethnic staff, particularly where they are anxious about protecting themselves and their families.  All Minority Ethnic staff with underlying health conditions and disabilities, who are over 70, or who are pregnant should be individually risk assessed, and appropriate reasonable or workplace adjustments should be made following risk assessment.

The Scottish Government has developed an individual employee risk assessment tool[1]. Individual risk assessments for Covid-19 exposure or vulnerability should be offered to all staff and conducted as a priority.

Characteristic

Sex / Gender

Summary of relevant impact

Globally there are almost equal numbers of infected cases amongst men and women. However, working age males diagnosed with COVID-19 in England were twice as likely to die as females. Age-standardised death rates were almost 50% higher in Scotland for men than for women in April.

Mothers are 23% more likely than fathers to have lost their jobs (temporarily or permanently) during the current crisis. Of those who were in paid work prior to the lockdown, mothers are 47% more likely than fathers to have permanently lost their job or quit, and they are 14% more likely to have been furloughed. https://www.ifs.org.uk/publications/14861.

The proportion of women working in the events industry is similar to the proportion in the overall workforce - 47% and 49% respectively. However, for Events Catering Activities, women make up 56% of the workforce and for Other Reservation Service and Related Activities they make up 73% of the workforce[2].

Proposed mitigating actions 

The guidance sets out that individual health circumstances and protected characteristics should be considered and discussed with the workforce before prioritising who is asked to return to work and when. Consideration of health circumstances and protected characteristics should be given to this as part of the risk assessment process.

Characteristic

Other protected characteristics

Summary of relevant impact

Pregnancy and Maternity – The NHS states that there is no evidence that people who are pregnant are more likely to get seriously ill from coronavirus. However, they have been included in the list of people at moderate risk (clinically at risk) as a precaution.

Gender reassignment

We are not aware of any evidence that people transitioning from one gender to another are more likely to get seriously ill from coronavirus or that the Guidance will impact on them.

Marriage and Civil Partnership

We are not aware of any evidence that people in this protected characteristic are more likely to get seriously ill from coronavirus or that the Guidance will impact on them.

Religion or Belief

We are not aware of any evidence that religion, faith or belief will be impacted by the content of the Guidance. 

Sexual Orientation

We are not aware of any evidence that the Guidance will affect those in the LGBTI+ community.

Proposed mitigating actions 

The guidance sets out that individual health circumstances and protected characteristics should be considered and discussed with the workforce before prioritising who is asked to return to work and when.

Characteristic

Summary of relevant impact

Socio-economic disadvantage: any people experiencing poverty 

The Institute for Fiscal Studies estimates that low earners were seven times more likely than high earners to have worked in a sector that has shut down as a result of the lockdown.[3]

Around 78% of workers in the events sector earn at or above the Living Wage compared with 83% of all Scottish employees.[4]

Any move to completely cashless events may have a negative impact on people from lower socio-economic who are more likely to use cash. Completely removing paper tickets and moving to smartphones could exclude people without access to this technology or with limited data allowances, which could include people on lower incomes.

Proposed mitigating actions 

While cashless payments and reducing paper tickets may help to reduce the chances of transmission of coronavirus, the guidance checklist sets out that event organisers should consider procedures if someone is unable to access a smartphone or is unable to pay using contactless technology.

Background

The Coronavirus (COVID-19): Framework for Decision-Making and Scotland's Route Map through and out of the crisis ("the Route Map"), along with subsequent updates published on a 3 weekly basis, make clear that COVID-19 is first and foremost a public health crisis and the measures to combat it have been necessary to save lives. 

The Framework for Decision-Making identified four main categories of harm: direct health impacts, non-COVID-19 health harms, societal impacts and economic impacts. These harms are deeply inter-related: health harms impact on society and the economy, just as the societal and economic effects impact on people's physical and mental health and wellbeing. The Route Map sets out the range and phasing of measures proposed for Scotland as it moves out of lockdown. Like the initial response to the crisis, navigating the right course out of lockdown involves taking difficult decisions that seek to balance these inter-related harms and risks.

Recognising the extraordinary impact of the measures, Scottish Ministers have put in place a statutory requirement to review the restrictions every three weeks to ensure they remain proportionate and necessary. The Framework for Decision Making makes clear that these reviews will be informed by assessments of options for relaxation under their impact on the 'four harms', their viability, and broader considerations including impacts on poverty and equality and consideration of measures, for example, for specific geographies and sectors. 

The Scottish Government considered from the outset whether the lockdown provisions were consistent with the Equality Act 2010 and also considered whether the provisions could constitute indirect discrimination. (The Act states that indirect discrimination occurs when a policy which applies in the same way for everybody has an effect which particularly disadvantages people with a protected characteristic, unless the person applying the policy can justify the differential treatment.) 

Where potential indirect discrimination has been identified we are mindful that this must be a proportionate means of achieving a legitimate aim to comply with equality law. This will be kept under close review.  While in many cases, the provisions have applied to all persons irrespective of protected characteristic, we recognise that not all people or communities are affected in the same way or to the same degree. 

Therefore, the evidence we have gathered and ongoing dialogue with stakeholders, including equality stakeholders, will help to inform thinking as to how the proposals may need to be adjusted to remove barriers or disadvantages for particular equality groups, to better advance equality; to foster good relations; or to reduce socio-economic disadvantage.

Scope of EQIA

The Scottish Government's Safer Workplaces team have undertaken an overarching Equalities and Fairer Scotland Impact Assessment (EQFSIA) for the development of sectoral guidance as a whole - you can view the document here.  

As part of the development of ongoing updates to the Events Sector Guidance we are considering the impacts on different groups with protected characteristics under the Equalities Act 2010 in order to see if there are particular matters we should be taking into account.  The protected characteristics are age, disability, gender reassignment, pregnancy and maternity, race, religion or belief, sex and sexual orientation.

Evidence

Given the unprecedented nature of the pandemic there are gaps in knowledge and in the evidence base. We are developing data, research and understanding of lived experience as we move forward.

The headline data, engagement and information gathered to underpin this results EQIA includes:

Age

Most younger people face lower health risks from COVID-19 than the general population. Older people are more likely to have underlying health conditions such as heart disease and diabetes, and ageing immune systems, and so the death rate from coronavirus increases substantially with age. As at 3 June 2020, over three quarters (76%) of all deaths involving COVID-19 to date were of people aged 75 or over. Nearly half (46%) of COVID-19 deaths registered to date related to deaths in care homes, 46% of deaths were in hospitals and 7% of deaths were at home or non-institutional settings.

It is important that people are reached with accurate and clear information on how to try and protect themselves from infection. Nearly one in five (17%) of respondents to an April 2020 Ofcom survey of the public's news consumption and attitudes[5] agreed that they are 'confused about what they should be doing in response to COVID-19', and 40% agree that they are 'finding it hard to know what's true and what's false about COVID-19'. Those aged 18-24 (52%) were more likely to agree that they are finding it hard to know what's true and what's false compared to those aged 65+ (30%). 

In a YouGov survey of adults in the UK, carried out on 13-20 April 2020, the percentage reporting that they were finding it difficult to stick to the social distancing rules decreased with age (from 18% of 18-24 year olds to 7% of those aged 65+).[6]

In a survey carried out by Young Scot, 99% of respondents stated that they are able to access online services via a device at home and 96% stated they have access to reliable broadband or data at home.[7]

Approximately 51% of the events workforce is under the age of 35 compared to around 35% for Scotland's workforce as a whole. A disproportionately young workforce could result in a heightened risk and impact (in terms of lost lifetime earnings) of unemployment in the industry.[8]

Disability

The Scottish Health Survey estimates that, in 2018, 33% of adults (and 12% children) in Scotland were disabled, defined as having a limiting long-standing condition, and 46% of adults (and 6% of children) had a non-limiting longstanding illness.[9]

Disabled people are more likely to experience ill-health from contracting COVID-19 than the general population, due to higher prevalence of pre-existing health conditions and poorer overall health. 

Around 170,000 adults in Scotland have been defined on medical grounds as clinically extremely at risk due to having an existing health condition that puts them at very high risk of severe illness from COVID-19[10]. An additional group of people are required to follow enhanced social distancing, because pre-existing health conditions or circumstances mean they are at increased risk of severe illness from COVID-19[11]. These people require additional protection from infection and therefore possibly support accessing food and essential supplies until the highest infection risk has passed. A large proportion of disabled people will fall into these groups.[12]

The top concerns that disabled people have about visiting places as lockdown restrictions lift are: People not respecting and honouring social distancing; not having access to venues' or public toilets when outside; and having to queue or wait outside venues, especially when weather is bad.[13]

Race

Existing social inequalities in the areas of poverty, health, housing and employment may mean that minority ethnic groups are disproportionately impacted by the negative fall-out of this public health emergency. The best data on ethnicity is the 2011 Census but this is from almost 10 years ago so the position may have changed since then. The Scottish Household Survey in 2018, estimated that just over 11% of the population were ethnic minorities (6.6% were white non British; 2.8% Asian and 1.7% other). Data from early learning and childcare registrations in 2019 showed that 9.3% of children registered had a home language other than English. This is an increase of 3.2 percentage points since 2010. 

Deaths among people from the South Asian ethnic group were almost twice as likely to involve COVID-19 than deaths in the Scottish / British White ethnic group, (largest number of numerical deaths in minority ethnic was white Irish), after accounting for age group, sex, area deprivation and urban/rural classification.[14]

The social impact of COVID-19 has been profound and extreme across every ethnic group particularly those in socio economic inequality.[15]

In terms of events, and in particular casual labour, Eastern European, African and others have been identified as potentially at risk groups.  In terms of participation and attendance, access is in danger of being restricted by COVID due to financial implications and lack of additional resources hitting ethnic minority families hard. 

According to the Ethnic Minority National Resilience Network (Scotland) which is coordinated by BEMIS Scotland, minority ethnic communities have disproportionate vulnerabilities to COVID19 exposure. This is represented in both social and health outcomes. For example, due to the immigration status of some minority ethnic individuals it is financially harder to self-isolate because their precarious employment circumstances mean they will not receive furlough pay or state benefits. This means they are more likely to work in low paid and non unionised work environments where PPE and social distancing regulations are not being appropriately adhered too. 

Sex/Gender

Just over half (51%) of Scotland's population are women. The ratio of women to men is higher in older age groups, reflecting women's longer life expectancy.

People outside the shielded group but with pre-existing health conditions or circumstances that mean they are at increased risk of severe illness from COVID-19[16] are required to follow enhanced social distancing. This includes pregnant women and over 70s (of which women make up a larger portion). Women also make up a larger percentage of the population in Scotland living with a long-term health condition.[17]

However, death rates from COVID-19 are similar for men and women, and much higher for men when age differences are taken into account[18]

In the pre-COVID-19 labour market, women were unequal in terms of pay, participation and progression due to a variety of drivers including occupational segregation, job valuation, discrimination, and time available to work.[19]

The proportion of women working in the events industry is similar to the proportion in the overall workforce- 47% and 49% respectively. However, for Events Catering Activities, women make up 56% of the workforce and for Other Reservation Service and Related Activities they make up 73% of the workforce. 

Research has highlighted a disproportionate impact of Covid-19 on women. Women are more likely to have reduced hours, been made redundant, and been furloughed. Women working from home have had additional responsibilities (childcare and work). Not all women have been affected equally – young and minority ethnic more affected and pregnant women are also significantly impacted. Mothers are 23% more likely than fathers to have lost their jobs (temporarily or permanently) during the current crisis. Of those who were in paid work prior to the lockdown, mothers are 47% more likely than fathers to have permanently lost their job or quit, and they are 14% more likely to have been furloughed.[20]

Socio-economic disadvantage: people experiencing poverty 

Poverty has higher prevalence across protected characteristics. For example, risk of poverty is much higher for women, disabled people, minority ethnic people, lone parents, and children and young people. We know that work does not fully protect against poverty, with 60% of adults in poverty being in work.[21]

The effects of COVID-19 will layer on top of existing structural imbalances and are predicted to be particularly severe for people on low incomes, who are more likely to have poorer health and are also more likely to be in insecure work without financial reserves. The roles of people actively employed as key workers since lockdown measures were introduced include many that are characterised by low and/or unstable income. In addition, the Institute for Fiscal Studies estimates that low earners were seven times more likely than high earners to have worked in a sector that has shut down as a result of the lockdown. This, coupled with the cramped accommodation without private outdoors space and more frequent smaller purchases that are common to households experiencing poverty, could significantly increase the chances of infection during lockdown and early release phases. 

Evidence from Black and Ethnic Minority Infrastructure in Scotland (BEMIS) highlights particular issues for minority ethnic communities.  Headlines include: 

  • The social impact of COVID-19 has been profound and extreme across every ethnic group particularly those in socio economic inequality. 
  • In terms of the events workforce - and particularly casual labour – there are particularly negative impacts for Eastern European, African and others as potentially vulnerable groups.
  • In terms of participation and attendance access is in danger of being restricted by COVID-19 due to financial implications and lack of additional resources hitting families hard. 

More generally, data from the National Records of Scotland indicates that the death rate from COVID-19 was 2.1 times higher in Scotland's poorest areas.[22]

Employees in the events sector are less likely to be paid wages at the level of the Living Wage or above than Scotland's employees as a whole. Only around 78% of workers in the events sector earn at or above the Living Wage compared with 83% of all Scottish employees.[23]

Median pay for employees in the events sector is lower than that for median pay of all Scottish employees. Median pay for employees in the events sector was approximately £23,911 compared with approximately £30,000 for all Scottish employees.[24]

Recommendations

To address the opportunities set out above the following actions should be considered by event organisers when restarting events:

Age

The events guidance sets out that individual health circumstances and protected characteristics should be considered and discussed with the workforce before prioritising who is asked to return to work and when. This should recognise the protective measures required to minimise health risks to at risk or shielded workers or those living in shielded households, exploring whenever possible how these staff can work from home. Consideration of health circumstances and protected characteristics should be given to this as part of the risk assessment process.  Permission should be sought from individuals before collecting any information on health conditions of those within their household.  

Certain groups are at higher risk from coronavirus, such as those over 70. Organisers should consider whether their likely audience is a group at higher risk from coronavirus and if so whether the event should take place.  Organisers may wish to consider if the event can be delivered in alternative formats to reduce risk, such as online or a hybrid event.

Consideration should also be given to events that primarily attract a young audience and are delivered by young people (for example a youth club).   Event organisers may also wish to consider a co-design approach with young people at the outset of the planning of an event aimed at young people which would allow discussion about the risks from COVID, mitigations that will be in place and the role of attendees in reducing transmission. YoungScot can advise further on this approach.

Communications and messaging for young people should be aimed at the appropriate levels.  For example, consideration should be given to language and communication channels. YoungScot can offer further advice, if required.

Transport provision should be taken into consideration for young people attending events and clear and advance notification given if they are required to be accompanied by an adult.

Consideration should be given as to whether events can be delivered in a range of formats, for example on-line to allow people who may not be able to physically attend an event an equal opportunity to participate.

Event organisers should ensure that communication is provided through a range of channels (website, social media etc) to help ensure that they are accessed by the intended audience, of all age groups, for the event.  Attendees should have access to clear, concise information, as far in advance of the event as possible and should ensure that there is adequate provision of translation services, if required.  This should be accompanied by clear communication at the event.

Similarly, event organisers ensure that communications with the workforce are provided in a range of ways, workers are able to ask questions, and that workforce representatives are fully involved.

Information and guidance should be provided in different languages, as required.  Government advice on accessible communication formats is available at Inclusive communication/Accessible communication Formats.

Event organisers should be aware of Guidance/checklists regarding exemptions for face coverings, including for under 5's. 

Disability 

Event organisers should consider whether any of the measures they are implementing could create barriers for disabled people. Some examples of action that event organisers can take to ensure COVID-19 mitigations do not disproportionately affect disabled people being able to attend events include:

  • Checklist is clear that lifts can be used when required to ensure accessibility but should not be in general usage.
  • Guidance / Checklist highlights need to consider impact of face coverings and how to engage with those who lip read and to take into account that certain people, such as those with asthma, should not wear face coverings. 
  • Guidance indicates handwashing / sanitising should have sufficient provision at accessible height.
  • Guidance covers provision of accessibility information including all Covid precautions before and at the event and suggests a range of alternative formats to help ensure accessibility.
  • Guidance indicates events organisers should avoid repurposing accessible toilets for general use and disabled parking pays for other uses.

Event organisers should ensure that communication is provided through a range of channels, (website, social media etc) to ensure that disabled people have clear, concise information, including Covid precautions, as far in advance of the event as possible, about site access, accessibility of their journey to and from the site, etc to enable them to plan their journey and attendance. Information and guidance should be provided in different languages, as required.  Government advice on accessible communication formats is available at Inclusive communication/Accessible communication Formats.

Consideration should also be given to a dedicated Access Helpline and an "Access Champion" or "Access Buddy" system at the event i.e. designated people that are available to assist disabled visitors if needed. 

Event organisers should be aware that some people (attendees and workforce) might be unable to wear face coverings and consider how to ensure that this is handled appropriately. Further information is available at face coverings and Euan's Guide - Face Masks - Exemptions.  

Event organisers should be aware that people with hearing impairments will not be able to lip read if event guides are wearing face masks and so instead guides politely using gestures or writing things down can be helpful or event organisers could consider the use of special face masks with transparent panels.[25]

Event organisers should take into account that the top requirements that disabled people think would help them return to venues are: having access to sanitising stations that are at an accessible height; having an accessible route that disabled people can navigate independently; and having clear markings to ensure people physical distance.[26]

The nature of events industry is such that each event is unique and individual therefore a recommendation is for the event organiser were possible, to get input and involve local disabled in the create of their accessible facilities and services in order to find the most appropriate solution.

Useful publications to help create accessible friendly events include:

Consideration should be given as to whether events can be delivered in a range of formats, for example on-line, to allow those who may not be able to physically attend an event an equal opportunity to participate.

Race

Individual health circumstances and protected characteristics should be considered and discussed with the workforce before prioritising who is asked to return to work and when. This should recognise the protective measures required to minimise health risks to at risk or shielded workers or those living in shielded households, exploring whenever possible how these staff can work from home. Consideration of health circumstances and protected characteristics should be given to this as part of the risk assessment process.  Permission should be sought from individuals before collecting any information on health conditions of those within their household.  

For example, given that there is some evidence which suggests that Covid-19 may impact disproportionately on some groups (Minority Ethnic communities), employers should ensure that Occupational Health Service provide practical support to Minority Ethnic staff, particularly where they are anxious about protecting themselves and their families.  All Minority Ethnic staff with underlying health conditions and disabilities, who are over 70, or who are pregnant should be individually risk assessed, and appropriate reasonable or workplace adjustments should be made following risk assessment.

Event organisers should ensure that communication is provided through a range of channels, (website, social media etc) to ensure that everyone has clear, concise information, as far in advance of the event as possible and should ensure that there is adequate provision of translation services, if required.  

Information and guidance should be provided in different languages, as required.  Government advice on accessible communication formats is available at Inclusive communication/Accessible communication Formats

The Scottish Government has developed an individual employee risk assessment tool[27]. Individual risk assessments for Covid-19 exposure or vulnerability should be offered to all staff and conducted as a priority.

Gender

Individual health circumstances and protected characteristics should be considered and discussed with the workforce before prioritising who is asked to return to work and when. 

Although homeworking is likely to be limited in the events sector, the events guidance includes information that Close the Gap, through their 'Think Business Think Equality' toolkit, have produced for employers supporting employees affected by domestic abuse during the pandemic and a more general online self-assessment resource for employers on domestic abuse.

Other protected groups

Individual health circumstances and protected characteristics should be considered and discussed with the workforce before prioritising who is asked to return to work and when. 

Socio-economic disadvantage

Checklist sets out that event organisers should consider what will happen where people do not have access to contactless payments so that people are not excluded from an event and should consider what will happen where people do not have access to a smart phone or other electronic device so that people are not excluded from an event.

Monitoring, Evaluation and Lessons and Learning

New evidence is continually being produced and this evidence, alongside the views of partners in the public, private and third sector and the views of Scottish citizens will be important in identifying and taking the next steps.  

The Scottish Government would welcome your views and evidence and would be happy to have discussions with representative organisations to see whether any further opportunities to increase equality can be identified. 

This EQIA will remain live after publication and will be further developed and reviewed as we progress through the route map. Updated versions are available on request by contacting majorevents@gov.scot.

The Events Sector Guidance will be reviewed and updated on a regular basis in line with the regular three weekly review of lockdown requirements.  


Contact

Email: majorevents@gov.scot