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Control of invasive non-native species

Option closed to new applications

What is this about

This Option is for the targeted control of five invasive non-native species Rhododendron ponticum, Giant hogweed, Himalayan balsam, Japanese knotweed, and Grey Squirrels.

What will this achieve

Targeted eradication and control of the five invasive non-native species in certain areas of the country. This will help protect designated sites, Biodiversity Action Plan priority species and habitats, and assist rural land managers that need to control one of the named invasive non-native species as part of another SRDP management option.

What you can do

If you want to control any of the plants species in this Option, you must start control work in the first year of your agreement. At the end of year five there must be no Rhododendron, Japanese knotweed, giant hogweed or Himalayan balsam present on the treated area.

If you want to control Rhododendron ponticum we will support three eradication methods, manual, mechanised supported by chemical follow up and chemical. You need to check the technical specification for each method to find the one most suitable for your circumstances. Your method of control must aim to kill the plant.

If you want to control Japanese knotweed we will support two eradication methods chemical control and digging out. You need to check the technical specification for this option to find the one most suitable for your circumstances. Your choice of method must aim to kill the plant. Disposal of Japanese knotweed is controlled and you must meet the statutory requirements.

If you want to control Giant hogweed we will support three eradication methods, chemical, cutting/mowing and digging out. Your choice of control must aim to kill the plant, prevent flowering and seed dispersal. You need to check the technical specification for this Option to find the one most suitable for your circumstances. Giant hogweed is a hazardous weed and can cause severe burns to the skin which can develop into phytophotodermitis. A risk assessment must be carried out before you start work and protective clothing must always be worn when attempting any form of control. The disposal of giant hogweed is controlled and you must meet the statutory requirements.

If you want to control Himalayan balsam we will support four eradication methods, chemical, cutting/mowing/strimming, pulling and grazing. Your choice of control must aim to kill the plant and must prevent flowering.

If you want to control Grey Squirrels we will support the trapping and removal of Grey Squirrels in targeted areas. This will reduce the threat to Red Squirrels and protect stands of high biodiversity value broadleaf woodland.

Who can apply

This Option is available to rural land managers within limited geographically targeted areas and is for only for the species listed in this Option.

To qualify for funding for invasive non-native plant control, you must:

  1. be within the specific targeted areas where the plant species has been identified as a particular threat by SNH, SEPA or the FCS. In these areas applications will only be considered if they are part of a collaborative project or plan. Your application must either complement an existing plan/project or be part of a new co-ordinated plan/project within an area, catchment-wide or other self-contained area/habitat.
  2. require funding to undertake work where action is required to control the plant species for another SRDP Option to succeed, or
  3. be the first land manager in your area to have the plant species on your land.

A collaborative approach is essential unless the applicant meets the criteria contained in parts 2 or 3 above.

To qualify for Grey Squirrel control funding you must:

  • 1.    be in one of the control areas identified in the Red Squirrel Action Plan 2006-2011, and have evidence of Grey Squirrels on your land. For the period up to 2011 the control areas in the red squirrel action plan will include parts of the south west Borders, east Dumfries & Galloway, Grampian, North Perthshire and in the Cowal and Arrochar area of Argyll. Other areas may also be added during the period of the scheme.

or

  • 2.    have a stand of broadleaf woodland that has been identified by FCS of being part of a BAP priority habitat or of other high biodiversity value.

You can only apply for funding for either 1 or 2 but not both.

Eligibility criteria

You must meet all of the specifications set out in the technical guidance.

If you are proposing to undertake Rhododendron control, with your application you must submit a 1:10 000 OS map identifying the outlying area affected by Rhododendron and the percentage of that area proposed for treatment. This must include a ha. figure next to the area identified. Detail your proposal in your forest or management plan. Keep evidence that you have followed the guidance in the Forestry Code of Practice Guide Managing and controlling invasive rhododendron.

If you are undertaking Japanese knotweed, Giant hogweed or Himalayan balsam control with your application, you must submit a 1:10 000 OS map identifying the current distribution of plant species that you propose to treat before control work starts. Each year after that you must map the affected area following control work, each year. The map must include a hecterage figure next to the area identified.

You must keep a work programme which contains your proposed schedule of works and supporting evidence from statutory bodies. A copy of this must be kept which you need to provide as evidence upon inspection. Your work programme must contain at least the following:

  • Spraying records and evidence of appropriate statutory body agreement to spraying regimes around water courses or protected areas.
  • Evidence of regrowth monitoring.
  • Disposal transportation record and copies of Waste Transfer documentation.
  • Approval from SEPA for any spoil sites.
  • Copies of the COSHH assessment, and
  • Copies of certificates of spraying for individuals undertaking work or directly supervising spraying work.

You must not cut, flail, mow, strim or compost Japanese knotweed.

With your Grey Squirrel control proposal you must provide information on the current Grey Squirrel levels, current damage levels and current risk to the Red Squirrel population, and Scottish Natural Heritage and/or Forestry Commission Scotland will consider that information and must agree that your application is valid.

In addition, with your application you must include a proposed work programme to meet the objectives and priority actions in the Red Squirrel Action Plan. Your work programme must contain at least the following information:

  • Identify the location (grid reference) of the woodland to be controlled
  • The number of traps being deployed and the location of each trap and the dates between which traps will be set
  • Details about any proposed collaboration with neighbouring owners or Grey Squirrel control officers

You must keep a record of ongoing activity, which is regularly updated and available for inspection on request. Legally you are required to check traps daily. Keep detailed records of dates when animals were trapped, numbers of grey squirrels caught and that trapping is being carried out in accordance with published guidance on Grey Squirrel control and is compliant with animal welfare requirements.

Your record must also detail sightings records as evidence of the continued presence of Grey Squirrels within the proposed area, including the date and location from which they were obtained. Where necessary, transect survey will be required to verify the presence and extent of Grey Squirrels. This information must be recorded on an OS 1:10000 or larger scale map.

You must submit evidence each year to enable payment. This must include the 1:10 000 map showing the area that has been controlled and the ha., trapping dates, numbers caught. Within the south of Scotland you may be required to submit grey squirrels for squirrelpox testing, you will be informed if this will be required. You must keep records of any samples sent.

An Annual Record of Management Form is provided to help you to record your management.

When you submit your Single Application Form to your local SGRPID office you must also submit a copy of this form and include records from January through to the submission date. You must submit your records for the rest of the year by 31 December,

Please see the Definitions of Land Types page for more details.

What costs could be supported

This is a five year management agreement for all of the invasive non-native species in this Option.

In order to control Rhododendron applicants must select at least one of the capital items representing the three eradication methods, and costs will be claimed accordingly. Any cost claimed by the applicant must be fully justified.

Rate of support

Rhododendron ponticum payments are capital items and the payment rates are:

 

1

Manual eradication of Rhododendron:

£4,500 per hectare of infested land

2

Manual eradication of Rhododendron:

£6,100 per hectare of infested land

3

Manual eradication of Rhododendron:

£9,500 per hectare of infested land

4

Mechanised (and/or chemical) eradication of Rhododendron:

 

£1800 per hectare of infested land

5

Mechanised (and/or chemical) eradication of Rhododendron:

£2,400 per hectare of infested land

6

Mechanised (and/or chemical) eradication of Rhododendron:

£2,900 per hectare of infested land

7

Chemical eradication of Rhododendron by foliar or stem injection

£1,500 per hectare of infested land

 

For Japanese knotweed, Giant hogweed and Himalayan balsam the payment rate is £160 per ha per annum.

£160 per ha per annum broken down into:

  • Contractor costs £128.75 per hectare per annum; and
  • Costs for Glyphosate £31.25 per hectare per annum.

For the control of Grey Squirrels for Red Squirrel conservation using a single capture trap, the following payment rate will apply:

£185 per trap-site per annum, broken down into:

  • Contractor rate of £18.50 per hour at 10 hours per annum - 10 hours total time spent a trap per annum - 5 trapping sessions per annum with 2 hours spent per trap per session (over 7-10 days).

The cost includes purchase of the trap, bait and cover material such as black plastic. It also covers the cost of labour input during a trapping session and includes trap siting, pre-baiting, setting, checking, Grey Squirrel dispatch, recording, monitoring and squirrel pox virus testing.

For Grey Squirrel control for the protection of identified stands of high biodiversity value broadleaf woodland using multi-capture traps, the following payment rate will apply:

£111 per trap per annum, broken down into:

  • Contractor rate of £18.50 per hour at 6 hours per annum - 6 hours total time spent at a trap per annum - 3 trapping session per annum with 2 hours spent per trap per session (over 7-10 days).

Inspection/verification

In the case of Rhododendron control payments work and specified areas will be inspected against the OS map, agreed forest or management plan and operation specifications.

In the case of Japanese knotweed, Giant hogweed and Himalayan balsam control payments, the area will be inspected against the OS map and the spraying, monitoring and transportation records. You will need to provide written evidence of statutory body agreements, your COSHH assessment records and spraying certificates. Operations will be visually inspected and assessed to ensure that control has been implemented effectively.

In the case of payments for controlling Grey Squirrels, the area will be inspected against the OS map and your control records. You will also need to provide written evidence of the support of the squirrel project officer. Operations and traps will be visually inspected and assessed to ensure that control has been implemented effectively. Grey Squirrel levels may also be monitored.

Evidence

You must present your work programme, map

You must keep a record of ongoing activity along with all purchase receipts which must be made available for inspection.

Lists of links to relevant technical guidance