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Summary: Transgender

It is widely recognised that there is limited evidence on the experiences of transgender people in Scotland. Currently, there is no fully tested recommended question with which to collect information on gender identity in surveys or other data sources. A recent project carried out for the Equality and Human Rights Commission began work into this and the Scottish Government is considering future work in this area.

Scottish Social Attitudes to Discrimination

Information on public attitudes toward transgender people was collected in the 2010 Scottish Social Attitudes Survey.

  • More than half (55%) said they would be unhappy about a family member forming a relationship with someone who cross-dresses in public.
  • 49% said the same of someone who has had a sex change operation.
  • The research found that context is important when understanding public attitudes. Whilst almost half (49%) of people would be unhappy with a family member forming a relationship with someone who has had a sex change operation, 31% felt someone who has had a sex change operation would be an unsuitable primary school teacher.

Source: Scottish Social Attitudes Survey 2010: Attitudes to Discrimination and Positive Action

Crime and Justice
  • Offence aggravation data indicate that in 2015-16, 7 people were convicted in Scottish courts of an offence with an associated transgender aggravation. Six of these were for charges of breach of the peace.

    Source: Criminal Proceedings in Scotland, 2015-16 (Table 13)

  • 25% of respondents stated that they had to move out of their home (often ending up homeless) due to the transphobic reactions of their families, flat-mates or neighbours.
  • 62% of respondents stated that they had experienced transphobic harassment from strangers in public places who perceived them to be transgender: mostly this took the form of verbal abuse but 31% experienced transphobic threatening behaviour, 17% experienced transphobic physical assault and 4% experienced transphobic sexual assault.

Source: Transgender Experience in Scotland (2008)

This research has been carried out independently of the Scottish Government, the results are hosted on an external website and the findings do not necessarily represent the views of the Scottish Government or Scottish Ministers.

 

More facts on this topic: Transgender and Crime page

More equality characteristics for this topic: Crime and Justice page

Demographics
  • The Registrar General for Scotland maintains a Gender Recognition Register in which the birth of a transsexual person whose acquired gender has been legally recognised is registered showing any new name(s) and the acquired gender. This enables the transsexual person to apply to the Registrar General for Scotland for a new birth certificate showing the new name(s) and the acquired gender. In 2015, there were 25 entries in the Gender Recognition Register, an increase of 9 since 2014.  The Gender Recognition Register is not open to public scrutiny.

Source: NRS Registration Division (2015)

 

More facts on this topic: Transgender Demographics page

More equality characteristics for Demographics: Demographics page

Housing and Regeneration

A Scottish Transgender Alliance survey in 2012 addressed tenure and homelessness. It reported that 22% of 526 respondents owned their own property, with 11% renting privately as a joint tenant and nine percent renting privately as a single tenant. Most respondents lived in a city - 53% of the 545 answering this question - with a further 20% living in a town near a city; only 23% lived in an area that they described as rural.

Homelessness

  • 19% of the 542 respondents reported having been homeless at some point, with 11% having been homeless more than once. 171 respondents provided information about having to leave housing:
  • "7% stated that they had left their parental home due to people's reactions upon finding out that they were trans or had a trans history,
  • 6% had left a home shared with a partner,
  • 4% had left a home that was shared with other people,
  • 3% had had to leave their own home which they lived in alone due to other people's reactions to their trans status".

External Source: Scottish Transgender Alliance (2012) 'Housing' in Trans Mental Health and Emotional Wellbeing Study 2012, reported in Scottish Government Equality Outcomes: Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender (LGBT) Evidence Review (2013)

The research above has been carried out independently of the Scottish Government, and the findings do not necessarily represent the views of the Scottish Government or Scottish Ministers.

 

More equality characteristics for Housing and Regeration: Housing and Regeneration

Income and Poverty

Regarding welfare reform, the Department for Work and Pensions (DWP) has published an Equality Impact Assessment for the Universal Credit. This explains that the Department for Work and Pensions does not hold information on its administrative systems on gender reassignment, but also that it does not envisage any adverse impacts on these grounds.

External Source: DWP (2011) Welfare Reform Bill, Universal Credit: Equality impact assessment, reported in Scottish Government Equality Outcomes: Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender (LGBT) Evidence Review (2013)

The research above has been carried out independently of the Scottish Government, and the findings do not necessarily represent the views of the Scottish Government or Scottish Ministers.

 

More equality characteristics for Income and Poverty: Income and Poverty

Labour Market

A 2006 survey of the legal profession in Scotland found that:

  • Six percent did not state whether they consider themselves to be Transgender.
  • Less than one percent considered themselves to be Transgender.

External Source: Law Society of Scotland (2006) Survey, reported in Scottish Government Equality Outcomes: Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender (LGBT) Evidence Review (2013)
(There were 3,017 respondents to the survey and it covered the legal profession in Scotland i.e. not just those solicitors providing legal aid.)

The research above has been carried out independently of the Scottish Government, and the findings do not necessarily represent the views of the Scottish Government or Scottish Ministers.

 

More equality characteristics for Labour Market: Labour Market

School Education

An online survey of Transgender people in the UK in April 2011 sought adults' points of view regarding children's experiences in school:

  • Almost half of respondents (44%) thought that the behaviour of other children presented the most challenges to gender variant children;
  • Nearly two-thirds of respondents (47%) thought that intervention, such as guidance or training, would be best focussed in secondary school;
  • Nearly half of respondents (45%) thought that teachers did not have the tools to tackle the bullying of gender variant children in schools.

External Source: Government Equalities Office (2011) Headline findings from our transgender
e-surveys
, reported in Scottish Government Equality Outcomes: Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender (LGBT) Evidence Review (2013)

The research above has been carried out independently of the Scottish Government, and the findings do not necessarily represent the views of the Scottish Government or Scottish Ministers.

 

More equality characteristics for School Education: School Education

Publications and Outputs

Scottish Government Equality Outcomes: Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender (LGBT) Evidence Review (2013) - This evidence review was prepared to support the production of the Scottish Government's Equality Outcomes, with regard to lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender people.

Offence aggravations data tables 2011-12 - the data presented in these tables are collated on the basis of offences proved.

Scottish Social Attitudes Survey 2010: Attitudes to Discrimination and Positive Action - presents key findings from a study of public attitudes towards discrimination and positive action.

Challenging Prejudice: Changing Attitudes towards Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender People in Scotland, 2008 - Looks at attitudes towards LGBT people in Scotland.

Attitudes to Discrimination in Scotland, 2006 - This report explores attitudes to discrimination in Scotland in relation to all six of the grounds for which anti-discrimination legislation exists in Great Britain: age, disability, gender, race, religion or belief, and sexual orientation.

External Links

External Links

Please note that you will leave the Scottish Government web site by clicking on any of the following links, and that the Scottish Government and its staff are not responsible for content external to this web site. Any research has been carried out independently of the Scottish Government, the results are hosted on an external website and the findings do not necessarily represent the views of the Scottish Government or Scottish Ministers.

Inequality among lesbian, gay bisexual and transgender groups in the UK: A review of evidence (July 2016) - A review of evidence to identify the inequality and disadvantage experienced by lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender people in the UK. 

The Equality and Human Rights Commission - Focus on transgender equality.

Equality Network - Works for LGBTI equality and human rights charity.

Stonewall Scotland Research and publications; including 'Living Together' (2012) - Scottish attitudes to lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender people in 2012.

LGBT Youth Scotland - Contains information and resources for young people, and professionals seeking information on young people's experiences of gender identity.

The Scottish Transgender Alliance - works to improve gender identity and gender reassignment equality, rights and inclusion.

Transgender Experiences in Scotland: Research Summary (2008) - Key research findings of the Scottish Transgender Alliance survey of transgender people living in Scotland.

European Union lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender survey - A UK-level comparison with other European Countries in areas including employment and crime. Additionally, results are disaggregated by LGBT sub-group.

Recruiting and retaining transgender staff: a guide for employers - Please note that this guidance is in relation to legislation in England and Wales which may be different in Scotland.

Providing services for transgender customers: a guide - Please note that this guidance is in relation to legislation in England and Wales which may be different in Scotland.