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The Delivery of Psychological Interventions in Substance Misuse Services in Scotland Report

The Delivery of Psychological Interventions in Substance Misuse Services in Scotland Report

Monday, June 4, 2018

ISBN: 978-1-78851-917-5

This report sets out a strategy for best practice, following an identified need outlining the delivery of psychological interventions for Substance Misuse Services in Scotland.

Executive Summary

This report sets out a strategy for best practice The Delivery of Psychological Interventions in Substance Misuse Services in Scotland, following an identified need outlining the delivery of psychological interventions for Substance Misuse Services in Scotland.

It has evolved from strategic work carried out by the Lead Psychologists in Addiction Services Scotland (LPASS group), in collaboration with NHS Education for Scotland (NES) and the Ministerial led Partnership for Action on Drugs in Scotland (PADS)

In many cases, people struggling with mental health issues are also coping with problematic drug and/or alcohol use (often termed as co-morbidity or dual diagnosis) and have experienced childhood and adult based trauma. Because of this, they can often face multiple barriers in accessing psychological interventions despite the fact that these interventions can work well for these issues.

The report indicates that evidence based, psychologically informed support, delivered by a well-trained and supervised practitioner at any level of the treatment system, can be effective as part of an early intervention model. This lower level support can work well for individuals struggling to achieve stability.

The intention is that this report will provide guidance to support commissioners and providers in developing effective recovery-orientated systems of care, with a clear role for psychological and psychosocial interventions. It is also intended as a guide for training providers to assist them in prioritising, designing and implementing training programmes, and for practitioners to benchmark their own practice, to guide their professional development with a clear aim of improving quality and sustainability of recovery outcomes for service users.