We are testing a new beta website for gov.scot go to new site

Scottish Health Survey: Results for Local Areas 2013/2014/2015/2016; October 2017

Listen

Summary of results for Local Authorities

Self-assessed general health

The proportion of adults who rate their general health to be good or very good was significantly lower in North Ayrshire (66%), East Dunbartonshire (68%), and North Lanarkshire (70%) than in Scotland as a whole (74%). In Aberdeenshire (79%), City of Edinburgh (80%), and Orkney Islands (83%) the proportion in good or very good health was significantly higher than the estimate for Scotland.

WEMWBS

The Warwick-Edinburgh Mental Wellbeing Scale (WEMWBS) is used to measure mental wellbeing. The mean score for adults in Scotland in 2013-2016 was 49.9, and while the mean score was higher for men (50.1) than for women (49.9), this was not statistically significant. Those living in North Ayrshire (48.3) and East Dunbartonshire (48.5) had significantly lower mean scores than the Scotland estimate. Mean scores were significantly higher than the Scottish average for residents of Aberdeen City (50.7), Aberdeenshire, Highland (both 51.0), and Na h-Eileanan Siar (51.2).

General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-12) scores

The General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-12) is used to identify individuals showing signs of the presence of a possible psychiatric disorder (as indicated by scores of four or higher). The proportion of adults with scores of 4+ was significantly lower in Aberdeenshire (11%) than the proportion in Scotland as a whole (16%). The proportion of adults with scores of 4+ in East Dunbartonshire (21%) was significantly higher than in Scotland as a whole. In Scotland overall, significantly more women than men had a score of 4+ (17% compared to 14%).

Long-term conditions

A significantly lower proportion of adults in Aberdeenshire and City of Edinburgh (both 25%) reported a limiting condition compared to Scotland overall (32%), while this proportion was significantly higher in South Ayrshire (48%), East Ayrshire, North Ayrshire (both 43%), and Na h-Eileanan Siar (36%).A significantly higher proportion of Scottish women (34%) than men (30%) reported a long-term condition that limited their daily activities in some way.

Alcohol consumption

In the period 2013-2016, the proportion of adults who exceeded government guidelines on weekly alcohol consumption[4] was significantly lower than the national average (25%) in Aberdeenshire, East Dunbartonshire (both 22%), and Na h-Eileanan Siar (21%). In City of Edinburgh (33%) and North Ayrshire (29%) a significantly higher proportion of adults exceeded weekly guidelines than across Scotland as a whole. In all local authorities in which results were available, a significantly higher proportion of men than women exceeded the guidelines.

Residents of Aberdeenshire reported the lowest mean number of units consumed among drinkers on a weekly basis (11.1), which was significantly lower than the Scottish mean number of units (12.6). City of Edinburgh (15.0) and North Ayrshire (15.6) were significantly higher than the Scotland mean. Male drinkers reported significantly higher weekly mean units than their female counterparts in every local authority for which there were results available.

Smoking

An estimated 21% of adults were regular smokers between 2013 and 2016, with prevalence significantly higher among men than women (23% of men, 20% of women). The proportion of regular smokers was lowest in Aberdeenshire and Orkney Islands (both 17%) - although only Aberdeenshire (along with City of Edinburgh at 18%) was significantly lower than the Scotland figure. East Dunbartonshire (28%) and North Ayrshire (26%) were both significantly higher than the Scotland figure.

Overweight (including obesity)[5]

In Scotland, 65% of individuals were overweight or obese, with the figure for men (69%) significantly higher than that for women (61%). Results for a number of boards were significantly different to the Scotland figure. These included lower results for East Dunbartonshire (60%) and City of Edinburgh (54%), and higher results for East Ayrshire (69%), Na h-Eileanan Siar (71%), North Ayrshire (72%), and North Lanarkshire (73%).

Obesity[6]

In 2013-2016, obesity rates were significantly lower in Aberdeen City, East Dunbartonshire (both 25%), and City of Edinburgh (18%) compared to the Scottish average (28%). The rates for adults in Fife (32%), East Ayrshire, Na h-Eileanan Siar, North Lanarkshire (all 34%), and North Ayrshire (37%) were significantly higher than for Scotland overall. At Scotland level, the obesity rate for women (29%) was significantly higher than the rate for men (27%).

Fruit and vegetable consumption

The proportion of adults consuming the recommended five portions (or more) of fruit and vegetables per day was significantly lower than across Scotland as a whole (21%) among North Ayrshire (14%), East Ayrshire (15%), and North Lanarkshire (16%). The proportion in City of Edinburgh (29%) was significantly higher than the Scotland figure. At Scotland level, the proportion consuming the recommended five portions (or more) was significantly higher for women (22%) than men (20%).

The mean portions of fruit and vegetables consumed per day in North Ayrshire (2.5), East Ayrshire, and North Lanarkshire (both 2.7) was significantly lower than the Scottish mean (3.1 portions). The number was significantly higher in City of Edinburgh (3.8) compared to the national average, while at Scotland level women consumed significantly more portions (3.3) compared to men (3.0).

Physical activity

In 2013-2016, the lowest proportion of adults meeting the physical activity guidelines was observed in East Ayrshire (58%), North Ayrshire, and North Lanarkshire (both 59%), and East Dunbartonshire (60%), all of which were significantly lower than the proportion for Scotland (64%). The proportion in City of Edinburgh was significantly higher at 71%. Men in Scotland were significantly more likely to meet the guidelines (69%) than women (59%).

Cardiovascular (CVD) conditions

The proportion of individuals reporting a doctor-diagnosed CVD condition was significantly higher than the Scottish average of 16% in North Ayrshire (21%) and South Ayrshire (20%). The rate was significantly lower than the Scottish average in City of Edinburgh (12%). At Scotland level, men were significantly more likely to have a CVD condition (16%) than women (15%).