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Tenant Information Pack (Revised 2016)

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3 Information about your landlord

3.1 Landlord Registration

Most private landlords must register with their local council to ensure they are a 'fit and proper person' to let property. Details of any properties let by a landlord and any agent acting on a landlord's behalf must be notified to the council. For most landlords it is an offence to let a property without being registered, with a maximum fine of £50,000.

Your landlord's registration number should be included in your tenancy agreement (unless they have only recently applied to register). You can check online at www.landlordregistrationscotland.gov.uk to see if your landlord is registered or you can contact your local council. If your landlord is not registered, contact your local council.

You can find out more about landlord registration on the Scottish Government website: www.scotland.gov.uk/privaterenting

3.2 House in multiple occupation (HMO) licensing

An HMO (house in multiple occupation) is a property occupied by three or more tenants who are not members of the same family (or one or other of two families). HMO landlords must have a licence from the local council. This ensures that the property is managed properly and meets certain basic safety standards. You can find out more about HMOs on the Scottish Government website: www.scotland.gov.uk/privaterenting

To find out whether your property has an HMO licence, ask your landlord or contact your local council. Your council will have a list of all the licensed HMOs in their area.

It is a criminal offence for your landlord to operate an HMO without a licence, and they could be fined up to £50,000. If your local council thinks a property is being run as an unlicensed HMO, they can inspect it without giving any warning. If you think the HMO you are living in may be unlicensed, you should contact your local council.