We are testing a new beta website for gov.scot go to new site

Scotland's Spending Plans and Draft Budget 2016-17

Listen

Chapter 11 Culture, Europe and External Affairs

PORTFOLIO RESPONSIBILITIES

The Culture and External Affairs portfolio includes policy on culture, creative industries, and the support and development of Scotland’s national collections and performing arts organisations. It also covers the built environment, both historic and new, documentary heritage and European and international affairs.

The portfolio seeks to promote Scotland’s interests and identity at home and abroad and contributes to delivering economic growth through investment in heritage, culture and events.

It protects and provides access to Scotland’s historic environment, promotes the delivery of high-quality places and buildings to support Scotland’s communities, and produces trusted data about Scotland’s people and places.

Our commitment to prevention, equality, diversity and inclusion underpins this portfolio’s priorities. Our ambition is for the portfolio to support and raise the profile of Scotland’s heritage and cultural life to flourish at home and abroad. Our work is predicated on the belief that culture sits at the heart of our quality of life and wellbeing, empowering, enriching and shaping our communities.

The portfolio helps to ensure that our diverse and evolving cultural heritage thrives and is celebrated and that our historic environment, our national and international collections and our intangible heritage are cared for and enjoyed now and by future generations. It also seeks to strengthen our infrastructure, helping to ensure that all of Scotland’s communities have the opportunity to participate, benefit and flourish.

OUR PRIORITIES

The Scottish Government continues to deepen its relationships with key countries in the pursuit of furthering sustainable economic growth in Scotland and increasing Scotland’s visibility on the world stage.

The Government’s key international priority is to deliver an increased level of engagement with the European Union and its member states, strengthen our role as active members of the British-Irish Council and continue to enhance Scotland’s reputation as a good global citizen through our international development agenda.

Active engagement in the EU and internationally makes a major contribution to the Scottish economy, securing trade with EU and worldwide partners, as well as increasing public investment in agriculture, structural funds and research and development. Within the EU the Scottish Government is also committed to increasing Scotland’s return on EU competitive funding programmes and seconding staff to key European institutions to extend our knowledge base. Scotland’s leadership in areas such as climate change and renewable energy contributes substantially to Scotland’s attractiveness as a destination for inward investment.

The First Minister has made clear that tackling poverty and inequality in Scotland is one of this Government’s central aims for one simple reason: Scotland’s success as a nation depends upon our working together to deliver a strong economy whilst supporting a fairer society. As much as we strive to create a fairer Scotland, the Scottish Government is clear that inequality and poverty is not restricted to our borders – it is a global issue that needs a global response.

Scotland has always been an outward-looking nation, embracing the world beyond our borders. It is important that this legacy is continued with Scotland acting as a good global citizen and making a contribution to the international community. International development is of course a key tenet of that, making distinctive contributions in addressing global challenges such as climate change, tackling inequality and promoting human rights, and sharing our knowledge, skills and technical expertise for the global good.

Through our Major Events budget, we will support the successful delivery of the new national events strategy in order to develop and grow a flourishing, innovative and competitive events industry. This will enable Scotland to further enhance and sustain an inspirational programme of events each year that generate business, create jobs and boost the economy whilst delivering benefits to all of Scotland’s communities and building upon our nation’s strong reputation and international attractiveness.

We will continue to strengthen our culture and heritage infrastructure through direct investment in public-facing capital projects such as the V&A Dundee and the Kelvinhall refurbishment so that engagement in culture is increased and widened, and sustained throughout lives.

We will also ensure that Scotland’s national and international collections are cared for and enjoyed now and by future generations by continuing to invest in our National Collections’ facilities, supporting delivery of efficient, high-quality public services.

Scotland values its creative talent and provides opportunities for that talent to develop and thrive. Our continued investment in the arts and culture through Creative Scotland and the National Performing Companies will help ensure that Scotland’s culture reaches a wide audience at home and abroad. Our investment ensures all children and young people are encouraged and have the opportunity to engage in culture.

The Scottish Government is committed to delivering arts for all, and to giving every young person in Scotland the opportunity to access and engage with the arts, helping them to reach their full potential. The Youth Arts have an intrinsic merit, but they also boost the skills of those who participate and build their capacity, helping to tackle inequalities in Scotland and making Scotland a stronger, fairer and more inclusive society. We are working with a range of partners to create opportunities to get young people involved in art and culture including under the umbrella of Scotland’s first ever Youth Arts strategy, ‘Time To Shine’, and supported by initiatives including the Youth Music Initiative, Cashback for Creativity, Sistema Scotland and Aspire Dundee.

Libraries can empower communities – often in our most deprived areas where we know that young people can have lower levels of literacy and numeracy. The 2015-16 Public Library Improvement Fund supported many innovative libraries including £80,000 funding to enable all local authorities to trial methods to give all children automatic membership of their local library which was launched by the First Minister in August 2015.

These measures all help ensure that no-one’s background is a barrier to taking part in cultural life and giving young people all over Scotland a chance to take part in culture and the arts.

The newly established Historic Environment Scotland (HES) will use the properties and collections in its care, research and education programmes, publications and exhibitions to ensure Scotland’s historic environment makes a strong contribution to the cultural, social, environmental and economic wellbeing of the nation.

The National Records of Scotland’s (NRS) priorities for 2016-17 all have a strong focus on developing its Digital Services. NRS will initiate the design of its new Digital Preservation Service, play a leading role in progressing the ‘Data Linkage Framework’ strategy to securely deliver data research projects that benefit the public. It will also provide improved and expanded access to its rich set of records through a new ScotlandsPeople website and start the preparation of the next Census which will be predominantly delivered digitally.

Table 11.01: Spending Plans (Level 2)

Level 2 2015-16
Draft
Budget
£m
2015-16
Budget
£m
2016-17
Draft
Budget
£m
Europe and External Affairs 17.9 17.9 16.2
Culture* 170.2 170.2 154.1
Historic Environment Scotland** 44.6 44.6 45.0
National Records of Scotland 23.2 23.2 28.4
Total Level 2 255.9 255.9 243.7
of which:
DEL Resource 219.2 219.2 212.0
DEL Capital 28.7 28.7 26.7
Financial Transactions 8.0 8.0 5.0
AME - - -

*2015-16 figure now excludes £4.5 million relating to the Royal Commission on the Ancient and Historical Monuments of Scotland

**Includes Historic Scotland and Royal Commission on the Ancient and Historical Monuments of Scotland who merged in 2015-16

Table 11.02: Spending Plans (Level 2 real terms) at 2015-16 prices

Level 2 2015-16
Draft
Budget
£m
2015-16
Budget
£m
2016-17
Draft
Budget
£m
Europe and External Affairs 17.9 17.9 15.9
Culture* 170.2 170.2 151.6
Historic Scotland** 44.6 44.6 44.3
National Records of Scotland 23.2 23.2 27.9
Total Level 2 255.9 255.9 239.7
of which:
DEL Resource 219.2 219.2 208.5
DEL Capital 28.7 28.7 26.3
Financial Transactions 8.0 8.0 4.9
AME - - -

*2015-16 figure now excludes Royal Commission on the Ancient and Historical Monuments of Scotland

**Includes Historic Scotland and Royal Commission on the Ancient and Historical Monuments of Scotland who merged in 2015-16

Europe and External Affairs

Table 11.03: More Detailed Spending Plans (Level 3)

Level 3 2015-16
Budget
£m
2016-17
Draft
Budget
£m
Major Events and Themed Years 3.2 2.4
International Relations 14.7 13.8
Total 17.9 16.2
of which:
DEL Resource 17.9 16.2
DEL Capital - -
AME - -

What the budget does

The Europe and External Affairs budget supports the promotion of Scotland as well as its interests and identity at home and abroad in pursuit of sustainable economic growth. It contributes to the positioning of Scotland on the world stage as a good global citizen, particularly through our international development work. It funds the development and growth of our events industry and our annual portfolio of events delivers economic, community and reputational benefits. The budget also supports the attraction of talented and skilled individuals to live, study and work in Scotland.

In 2016-17 we will:

  • increase the level and frequency of Scottish engagement with EU institutions (including through the secondment of staff) to advance our policy objectives, develop our expertise in European affairs and increase our return on EU competitive funding programmes;
  • develop further strategic links with key countries across the EU, as well as the USA, Canada, Pakistan, India and China, whilst also taking advantage of opportunities to expand Scotland’s international engagement;
  • on our international development work: maintain the International Development Fund at £9 million enabling us to continue to provide support to development projects in our priority countries, including Malawi; and to continue to work across Ministerial portfolios to support international aims, including, on water management, climate justice, the UN’s Sustainable Energy for All initiative and the new UN Sustainable Development Goals; and
  • support the national events strategy for 2015-25, ‘Scotland the Perfect Stage’, by providing funding for Scotland’s national themed years (including the 2016 Year of Innovation, Architecture and Design and the 2017 Year of History, Heritage and Archaeology), Scotland’s annual Winter Festivals programme and individual events and activities that further develop Scotland’s wide and diverse events portfolio and the events industry.

Culture

Table 11.04: More Detailed Spending Plans (Level 3)

Level 3 2015-16
Budget
£m
2016-17
Draft
Budget
£m
Creative Scotland and Other Arts 56.7 52.6
Cultural Collections* 85.9 78.6
National Performing Companies 27.6 22.9
Total 170.2 154.1
of which:
DEL Resource 135.2 128.7
DEL Capital 27.0 20.4
Financial Transactions 8.0 5.0
AME - -

*Excludes Royal Commission on the Ancient and Historical Momuments of Scotland which now sits within the Historic Environment Scotland (HES) budget line

What the budget does

The Culture budget contributes towards enhancing the quality of life for communities and individuals throughout Scotland by creating the conditions which enable artists to flourish and as many people, groups and organisations as possible to benefit from and enjoy our culture and heritage. Our rich culture is not only valuable in its own right but participating in creative activities such as making, or engaging with, music or art can lead to a broad range of positive personal, social and economic benefits.

Creative Scotland supports the arts, screen and creative industries throughout Scotland. They enable people and organisations to work in and experience these sectors in Scotland by helping creative ideas to develop and flourish. These sectors also make a vital contribution to jobs and the economy in Scotland. They also help develop talent and skills amongst Scotland’s people. The Creative Industries growth sector contributes more than £5 billion to Scotland’s economy. In 2014 the number of jobs supported by the Scottish Creative Industries rose to over 71,000 – an increase of 4.7 per cent from the previous year.

Scotland’s 460 museums and galleries attracted 27.65 million visits in 2014 and sustain over 3,500 tourism-related jobs. The total induced economic impact of museums and galleries in 2014 was an estimated £891 million.

In 2016-17 we will:

  • invest in Scotland’s cultural infrastructure including continuing our support for the V&A Dundee project;
  • continue funding for the National Collections, maintaining their assets and enabling free access to the main collections for the public;
  • support the artistic and educational activity of our five National Performing Companies with over £22 million in direct funding, including support for the International Touring Fund;
  • provide Creative Scotland with over £32 million in core funding to support artists and cultural activity across all art-forms and for the benefit of communities right across Scotland;
  • maintain our support for the Youth Music Initiative at £10 million per annum, providing music-making activities for around 225,000 young people;
  • provide continued support in the region of £4 million for non-national museums, galleries and libraries, strengthening their connections with communities and developing the skills of those in the sector; and
  • in August 2016 we will host the 3rd Edinburgh International Culture Summit when we will bring together Culture Ministers from around the world to share ideas and solutions and to participate in debate during the Edinburgh Festivals.

Historic Environment Scotland

Table 11.05: More Detailed Spending Plans (Level 3)

Level 3 2015-16
Budget

£m
2016-17
Draft
Budget
£m
Operational Costs* 82.2 81.6
Capital Expenditure** 0.2 3.4
Less Income (37.8) (40.0)
Total 44.6 45.0
of which:
DEL Resource 44.4 41.6
DEL Capital 0.2 3.4
AME - -

*Restated to include £4.3 million of Royal Commission on the Ancient and Historical Momuments of Scotland resource budget which now sits within the Historic Environment Scotland’s (HES) budget line

••Restated to include £0.2 million of RCAHMS capital budget

What the budget does

HES is a new public body established by the Historic Environment Scotland Act 2014. Its primary purpose is to investigate, care for and promote Scotland’s historic environment and to manage its collections as a national resource for reference, study and research. It is the lead public body for delivering Scotland’s historic environment strategy ‘Our Place in Time’, the largest operator of paid visitor attractions in Scotland and provides advice on the management of Scotland’s wider historic environment.

Through its grant schemes, HES contributes funding for the regeneration of Scotland’s town centres and the repair of historic buildings. Between 2005 and 2015, Historic Scotland awarded grants of £131 million that assisted repairs of over £560 million, evidencing the significant leverage that historic environment investment can deliver. HES employs many skilled craftsmen to maintain its properties, working with colleges and others to promote and support traditional skills.

In 2016-17 HES will:

  • deliver the statutory functions set out in the Historic Environment Scotland Act 2014, in support of Scotland’s historic environment including playing a lead role in the delivery of ‘Our Place in Time’;
  • continue to offer grant support to deliver benefits for communities by helping regenerate and promote the active use, care and maintenance of the historic environment, broadening access to it, promoting sustainable economic and rural development and reinforcing local identity and a sense of place;
  • provide expert advice and guidance to encourage informed decision-making and achieve the right balance between conservation and sustainable change;
  • promote learning and education to enhance knowledge, understanding and enjoyment of the historic environment, delivering learning programmes linked to the Curriculum for Excellence, to National and Vocational Qualifications and to opportunities in further and higher education;
  • encourage engagement with, participation in and enjoyment of the historic environment and increase the diversity of people accessing it; and
  • deliver ‘Scotland’s Traditional Skills Strategy’, including progressing the Engine Shed Building Conservation Centre in Stirling and the Traditional Buildings Health Check pilot scheme.

National Records of Scotland

Table 11.06: More Detailed Spending Plans (Level 3)

Level 3 2015-16
Budget

£m
2016-17
Draft
Budget
£m
Operational Costs 29.2 31.3
Capital Expenditure 1.5 2.9
Less Retained Income (7.5) (5.8)
Total 23.2 28.4
of which:
DEL Resource 21.7 25.5
DEL Capital 1.5 2.9
AME - -

What the budget does

The National Records of Scotland budget supports the collection, preservation and production of information about Scotland’s people and history. This includes performing the registration and statistical functions of the Registrar General for Scotland, for example the census and a wide range of demographic data, the archival and public records functions of the Keeper of the Records of Scotland, and maintaining the archives as one of Scotland’s five National Collections.

In 2016-17 we will:

  • continue planning of the next census (in 2021) as Scotland’s richest source of demographic information;
  • produce a range of demographic estimates and projections on Scotland’s population and households;
  • ensure information of historical importance produced in digital format can be preserved for posterity by designing a new NRS Digital Preservation service;
  • extend digital access to our family history records including the re-designed online ScotlandsPeople service to improve the customer experience and develop new and existing markets;
  • ensure transparency for the citizen as delivered by Scottish Government websites is sustained in perpetuity through a new Web Continuity Service for the whole of Scottish Government; and
  • progress the Scottish Government’s ‘Data Linkage Framework’ strategy to securely deliver publicly beneficial data research projects through the Scottish Informatics and Linkage Collaboration (SILC), the Scottish Health and Ethnicity Linkage Study (SHELS) and the Scottish Longitudinal Study (SLS) joining up academic researchers and policy makers.