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Government Expenditure & Revenue Scotland 2013-14

Government Expenditure & Revenue Scotland 2013-14

Wednesday, March 11, 2015

ISBN: 9781785441820

Government Expenditure and Revenue Scotland (GERS) is a National Statistics publication. It estimates the contribution of revenue raised in Scotland toward the goods and services provided for the benefit of Scotland. The estimates in this publication are consistent with the UK Public Sector Finances published in January 2015.

Executive Summary

Total Public Sector Revenue 2013-14:

Scottish onshore revenue was estimated as £50.0 billion (8.1 per cent of UK onshore revenue). This represents £9,400 per person, £300 less than the UK average;

Including a population share of North Sea revenue, the estimate is £50.4 billion (8.1 per cent of UK). This represents £9,400 per person, £300 less than the UK average.

Including an illustrative geographic share of North Sea revenue, total public sector revenue is estimated at £54.0 billion (8.6 per cent of UK public sector revenue). This represents £10,100 per person, £400 more than the UK average.

Total Public Sector Expenditure 2013-14

Total expenditure for the benefit of Scotland by the Scottish Government, UK Government, and all other parts of the public sector was £66.4 billion. This is equivalent to 9.2 per cent of total UK public sector expenditure, and £12,500 per head.

Current Budget Balance 2013-14

This is the difference between current revenue and current expenditure (i.e. excluding capital investment). The current budget balance:

Excluding North Sea revenue, was a deficit of £13.8 billion (10.3 per cent of GDP).

Including a population share of North Sea revenue, was a deficit of £13.4 billion (9.8 per cent of GDP).

Including an illustrative geographic share of North Sea revenue, was a deficit of £9.8 billion (6.4 per cent of GDP).

For the UK, was a deficit of £71.5 billion (4.1 per cent of GDP)

Net Fiscal Balance 2013-14

This is the difference between current revenue and total public sector expenditure including capital investment. The net fiscal balance:

Excluding North Sea revenue, was a deficit of £16.4 billion (12.2 per cent of GDP).

Including a population share of North Sea revenue, was a deficit of £16.0 billion (11.7 per cent of GDP).

Including an illustrative geographic share of North Sea revenue, was a deficit of £12.4 billion (8.1 per cent of GDP).

For the UK, was a deficit of 97.3 billion (5.6 per cent of GDP).