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Scottish Crime and Justice Survey 2012/13: Sexual Victimisation & Stalking

Scottish Crime and Justice Survey 2012/13: Sexual Victimisation & Stalking

Wednesday, June 25, 2014

ISBN: 9781784126117

Results from the Sexual Victimisation and Stalking modules of the 2012/13 Scottish Crime and Justice Survey

Executive Summary

Introduction

The Scottish Crime and Justice Survey (SCJS) is a large-scale survey measuring people’s experience and perceptions of crime in Scotland. The survey is conducted biennially and based on a representative sample of adults (aged 16 and over), living in private households in Scotland. The aims of the SCJS are to:

  • Provide a valid and reliable measure of people’s experiences of crime, including services provided to victims of crime.
  • Examine trends in the number and nature of crimes in Scotland over time.
  • Examine the varying risk of crime for different groups of adults in the population.
  • Collect information about people’s experiences of, and attitudes to a range of crime and justice related issues.

The main survey is based on 12,045 face-to-face interviews which are conducted in private households. Respondents are also asked to answer a separate self-completion module on more confidential and sensitive issues, including drug taking, partner abuse, sexual victimisation and stalking. The self-completion section of the SCJS 20102/13 questionnaire was completed by 10,235 respondents, which represents 85% of all respondents. This report examines the prevalence and nature of sexual victimisation, stalking and harassment in Scotland. The data presented in this report were collected through the self-completion module of the survey. The 2012/13 survey is the fourth sweep of the SCJS to include a sexual victimisation and stalking questionnaire, with previous data sweeps conducted in 2008/09, 2009/10 and 2010/11.

The report is structured as four chapters. Chapter one provides background information to the survey, including key definitions used in the report, the methodology used, and the strengths and limitations of the data. Thereafter, chapter two examines stalking and harassment, chapter three examines serious sexual assault, and chapter four examines less serious sexual assault. Key findings from each chapter are set out next.

Key Findings

Stalking and harassment

  • 6% of adults reported at least one form of stalking and harassment in the last 12 months.
  • 2% of adults reported more than one form of stalking and harassment incidents in the last 12 months.
  • The risk of stalking and harassment, as defined by the SCJS 2012/13, was equal for men and women at 6%.
  • 10% of 25 to 34 years olds had experienced at least one form of stalking and harassment in the last 12 months, compared to 2% of those aged 65 years and over.
  • 11% of those who were classified as victims in the main questionnaire had experienced at least one form of stalking and harassment in the last 12 months, compared to 5% of non-victims.
  • 8% of those living in the 15% most deprived areas of Scotland reported at least one form of SCJS stalking and harassment, compared to 5% of those living in the remaining areas.
  • Victimisation varied according to the type of stalking and harassment. Of those who reported receiving unwanted emails or texts, 49% were male, and 51% were female. In contrast, of those who experienced someone waiting or loitering outside their home or workplace, 71% were female and 29% male.
  • 58% of those who experienced at least one form of stalking and harassment in the last 12 months knew the offender in some way, whilst 29% did not know the offender at all.
  • Of those who experienced more than one form of stalking and harassment in the last 12 months, 69% said that the same person was involved.
  • Of those who had experienced stalking and harassment in the last 12 months, 20% had reported the most recent incident to the police.
  • Of those who had experienced at least one form of stalking and harassment in the last 12 months, 51% had received unwanted texts and emails, and 24% had been approached via social network sites.

Serious sexual assault

  • 3% of adults had experienced at least one form of serious sexual assault since the age of 16. This proportion was consistent across the last four sweeps of the SCJS.
  • 1% of adults had experienced more than one form of serious sexual assault since the age of 16.
  • 4% of women had experienced serious sexual assault since the age of 16, compared with 1% of men.
  • 83% of those who had experienced serious sexual assault since the age of 16 said that that they knew the offender in some way. 54% said that the perpetuator was their partner.
  • 94% of those who had experienced serious sexual assault since the age of 16 said that the offender was male. When the victim was female, this proportion rose to 97%.
  • Of those who had experienced forced sexual intercourse since the age of 16, 19% said that the most recent (or only) incident was reported to the police.

Less serious sexual offences 

  • 8% of adults had experienced at least one type of less serious sexual offence since the age of 16.
  • 1% of adults had experienced at least one form of less serious sexual offence in the last 12 months.
  • 2% of adults had experienced more than one form of less serious sexual offence since the age of 16.
  • 13% of women had experienced at least one form of less serious sexual offence since the age of 16, compared to 2% of men.
  • 94% of those who had experienced at least one form of less serious sexual offence since the age of 16 said the offender was male.
  • The offender-victim relationship varied according to the type of sexual offence.