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Preparing Scotland: Having and Promoting Business Resilience

Preparing Scotland: Having and Promoting Business Resilience

Thursday, December 5, 2013

ISBN: 9781784120245

This guidance focuses on how organisations can become more resilient. In particular, it provides advice to Category 1 responders and information to other readers about the duties set out in the Civil Contingencies Act (2004) and associated Regulations.

Executive Summary

Resilience, as described and promoted in Preparing Scotland, has many different but

interconnected elements. Although the ability to prepare for, respond to and recover from

emergencies and disruptions is relevant to organisations and communities of all sizes and types, how this is realised will vary according to their particular circumstances. The resilience of one organisation or group will, in turn, have consequences for others, creating a complicated network of influence: increasing or decreasing risk, promoting or discouraging resilient behaviour.

This diversity is reflected in Preparing Scotland, which recognises the different roles of a wide

range of agencies, organisations and individuals, and also the important contribution of

community resilience. Preparing Scotland recommends the benefits of joint working and the

value of considering the management of emergencies and disruptions from different perspectives. Within that broader context, this guidance focuses on how organisations can become more resilient. In particular, it provides advice to Category 1 responders and information to other readers about the duties set out in the Civil Contingencies Act (2004) and associated Regulations. This includes recommendations concerning:

• The ability of Category 1 organisations to continue to be able to perform their functions in

the event of emergencies; and

• The provision, by local authorities, of advice and assistance to businesses and other

organisations about the continuance of their activities.

These duties are often expressed as ‘having business continuity arrangements’ and ‘promoting

business continuity’.

The approach recommended in this guidance to fulfilling these duties is to apply the principles of Integrated Emergency Management, described in Preparing Scotland, in the context of

organisations and businesses. This approach to building ‘Business Resilience’ considers both:

• the logistical aspects of how organisations work, what could go wrong and how to deal

with this

• the cultural aspects of organisational behaviour, learning and attitudes to risk, within which resilience will be maintained