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Attitudes Towards the Gaelic Language

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Footnotes

[1] Those with fluent Gaelic were defined as those who can understand, speak, read or write Gaelic fluently.

[2] The standard six socio-economic ( SEG) or social grades, commonly used in research, are based on the current or previous occupation of the chief income earner in the household. AB includes higher and intermediate managerial, administrative and professional occupations, C1 includes supervisory or clerical, and junior managerial, administrative or professional occupations, C2 includes skilled manual workers whilst DE includes semi and unskilled occupations, state pensioners and the long-term unemployed.

[3] Weighting is the process by which data are adjusted to reflect the known population profile. This is to counter any effects of differential refusal rates, interviewers falling short on particular quotas, or to correct for any over-sampling of minority populations. A 'weight' is the percent assigned to a particular criterion. If this is not carried out then the results will not properly reflect the views of the population being considered.

[4] Those with fluent Gaelic were defined as those who could understand, speak, read or write Gaelic fluently.

[5] Based on findings from SOS omnibus, and reported in the BBC's Management Submission to the BBC Trust, the average weekly reach for Sep-08 - Mar-09 was 220,000 adults (or 5% of the Scottish adult population), based on claimed weekly reach of 15 or more minutes

[6] See Table 3.2 for regional analysis of levels of Gaelic knowledge

[7] Highlands and Islands West includes the interviews which took place in Western Isles, Ross, Skye and Inverness West and Argyll & Bute. Highlands and Islands East includes the interviews which took place in Caithness, Sutherland and Easter Ross, Moray and Inverness East, Nairn and Lochaber.