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Self-Directed Support: A Review of the Barriers and Facilitators

DescriptionThis is a report on the published literature on the barriers and facilitators of self- directed support. It was undertaken to inform a research study funded by the Scottish Government 2009-2011 that is evaluating initiatives in three local authorities. These initiatives aim to improve take up of self-directed support for people eligible for social care and other public funds.
ISBN978 1 780451497
Official Print Publication DateMarch 2011
Website Publication DateMarch 22, 2011

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Jill Manthorpe, Jessica Hindes, Stephen Martineau, Michelle Cornes, Julie Ridley, Helen Spandler, Ann Rosengard, Susan Hunter, Simon Little and Bill Gray

ISBN 978 1 78045 149 7 (Web only publication)
DPPAS 11504

This document is also available in pdf format (647k)

CONTENTS

1 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
Specific Barriers
What helps Self-Directed Support?
How this study was carried out
Next Steps

2 INTRODUCTION: DEFINING SELF-DIRECTED SUPPORT
Defining Self-Directed Support
Personalisation
Direct Payments ( DPs)
Cash and Counseling (American spelling)
Individual/Personal Budgets
Self-directed support ( SDS)
Other terms
Personal Assistance Services program ( US)
Individualised funding
Cash for care
Individualized Quality of Life project
Consumer-directed care
Summary and implications for research

3 METHODOLOGY
Inclusion criteria for search
Exclusion criteria for search
Screening procedure
Comments on research quality

4 BARRIERS
System wide
SDS cannot be implemented successfully without an active local third sector
Relationships between SDS and other benefits
SDS interfaces with other parts of the public sector are unclear
Lack of choice
Practitioner experiences and expectations
Staff are concerned about their jobs and roles in the light of SDS
SDS may result in poor working conditions for directly employed staff
SDS is a damaging and expensive move from block contracts
Service user and carer perspectives
The administrative burden of SDS is too great
Users (or carers) may not want the responsibility of managing their own money/services
A number of studies point to challenges with the employment of Personal Assistants ( PAs)
Negative aspects over the employment of family members
Users are unsure of expenditure limits
Legal and procedural frameworks
Management and leadership factors
Summary

5 FACILITATORS
Policy
Leadership
User and carer interests
Processes and procedures
Practitioner perspectives
Summary

6 OVERALL SUMMARY

7 REFERENCES

The views expressed in this report are those of the researcher and
do not necessarily represent those of the Department or Scottish Ministers.

This report is available on the Scottish Government Social Research website only
www.scotland.gov.uk/socialresearch.