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2010 Review of Goose Management Policy in Scotland

Description2010 Review of Goose Management Policy in Scotland.
ISBN9780-7559-99798
Official Print Publication DateFebruary 2011
Website Publication DateFebruary 23, 2011

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Revised Version October 2010

ISBN 978 0 7559 9979 8 (Web only publication)
DPPAS 11216

This document is also available in pdf format (2.3mb)

Scottish Government response to the review of Goose Management Policy in Scotland

Contents

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
ACRONYMS USED IN TEXT
SCIENTIFIC NAMES FOR GOOSE SPECIES AND POPULATIONS IN SCOTLAND

1 INTRODUCTION
1.1 Background to current Scottish Goose Management Policy and Structure
1.2 Policy drivers and the need for review
1.3 Remit of the current review
1.4 Methods of the current review

2 THE STATUS OF SCOTTISH GOOSE POPULATIONS: CONSERVATION OBLIGATIONS, OBJECTIVES AND KNOWLEDGE GAPS
2.1 The legislation governing goose management in the UK
2.2 Hunting arrangements in the UK and reporting systems as they apply to geese
2.3 Historical changes in legislation and possible impacts on goose populations
2.4 Obligations and opportunities for goose policy within wider biodiversity policy
2.5 Status of Scottish goose populations and conservation obligations
2.6 Has the Scottish National Policy Framework succeeded in meeting conservation obligations for geese?
2.7 Gaps in knowledge and suggested actions
2.8 Implementation of the 31 existing goose management policy recommendations
2.9 Conclusions

3 NATIONAL POLICY FRAMEWORK: STRUCTURE, DELIVERY AND EFFECTIVENESS
3.1 Institutional structure
3.2 National Goose Management Review Group
3.3 Local goose management groups
3.4 GSAG
3.5 SNH
3.6 Conclusions

4 THE ECONOMICS OF GOOSE MANAGEMENT: ITS PUBLIC BENEFITS, VALUE FOR MONEY AND COST-EFFECTIVENESS
4.1 An economic perspective
4.2 Economic value of geese
4.3 Population growth and the costs of damage
4.4 Shooting, sale of carcasses and egg control measures
4.5 Costs of local schemes
4.6 Increasing the cost-effectiveness of payment schemes
4.7 Generic issues in cost-effectiveness
4.8 Improving the cost-effectiveness of existing schemes
4.9 Conclusions

5 AREAS NOT CURRENTLY SUBJECT TO MANAGEMENT REGIMES
5.1 Principal areas affected
5.2 Orkney
5.3 Caithess
5.4 Lochaber, Spean and Roy Bridge
5.5 Conclusions

6 POLICY CONTEXT AND FUNDING MECHANISMS
6.1 The policy context and Scottish Government's economic strategy
6.2 Funding sources
6.3 Geographical restrictions
6.4 Prescription flexibility and complexity
6.5 Payment rates
6.6 Monitoring, verification and additionality
6.7 Governance
6.8 Security of funding
6.9 Administrative and negotiation costs
6.10 Conclusions

7 OPTIONS FOR GOOSE MANAGEMENT IN THE FUTURE
7.1 Introduction
7.2 Sustainable management
7.3 Policy context and objectives
7.4 Moving towards Species (population)-specific policy scenarios and objectives
7.5 Policy delivery options
7.6 Conclusions on policy options

8 CONCLUSIONS
8.1 Status of Scottish goose populations, conservation obligations and knowledge gaps
8.2 National policy framework and its delivery
8.3 Economics of goose management
8.4 Policy context and funding mechanisms
8.5 Goose management in the future
8.6 Specific options for policy funding and delivery

9 REFERENCES

10 APPENDIX A: IMPLEMENTATION OF THE 2005 REVIEW RECOMMENDATIONS

11 APPENDIX B: OVER-ARCHING CONSERVATION LEGISLATION AND INTERNATIONAL AGREEMENTS

12 APPENDIX C: INTERACTION BETWEEN GOOSE POLICY AND WIDER BIODIVERSITY POLICY IN SCOTLAND

13 APPENDIX D: ALL OPTIONS CURRENTLY AVAILABLE UNDER RURAL PRIORITIES

14 APPENDIX E: NATIONAL GOOSE MONITORING SCHEMES AND SPECIES SURVEYS

15 APPENDIX F: ARRANGEMENTS FOR GOOSE MANAGEMENT IN THE EU, SCANDINAVIA, ICELAND AND GREENLAND

16 APPENDIX G: LOCAL GOOSE MANAGEMENT SCHEMES
16.1 Islay Local Goose Management Scheme
16.2 Kintyre Local Goose Management Scheme
16.3 Solway Barnacle Goose Management Scheme
16.4 Loch of Strathbeg Goose Management Scheme
16.5 South Walls Goose Management Scheme
16.6 Tiree and Coll Goose Management Scheme
16.7 Uist Greylag Goose Management Scheme

17 APPENDIX H: OTHER SCHEMES, MANAGEMENT AGREEMENTS RELATING TO GEESE AND AREAS WITH GOOSE ISSUES
17.1 SNH funded schemes and agreements
17.2 Orkney
17.3 Caithness
17.4 Lochaber, Spean and Roy Bridge

18 APPENDIX I: SCOTTISH POLICY CONTEXT
18.1 Introduction
18.2 A narrower rural land use policy context
18.3 Main policy factors
18.4 How the National Policy Framework fits within the Government's Economic Strategy
18.5 Strategic objectives
18.6 Strategic priorities (embedded within & stretching across the strategic objectives)
18.7 Conclusion

Authors

Bob Crabtree, 1 Liz Humphreys, 2 Andrew Moxey 3 & Chris Wernham 2

1 CJC Consulting, 45 Southmoor Road, Oxford, OX2 6RF ( rcrabtree@cjcconsulting.co.uk)
2 BTO Scotland, University of Stirling, Stirling, FK9 4LA ( chris.wernham@bto.org)
3 Pareto Consulting, 29 Redford Avenue, Edinburgh, EH13 0BX ( apmoxey@pareto-consulting.co.uk)

©British Trust for Ornithology

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