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Evaluation of City of Edinburgh Council Home Care Re-Ablement Service

DescriptionThis study examined the early implementation of the new re-ablement service in one area of Edinburgh and explored its impact on a range of stakeholders. The costs of providing the service compared with the existing one was also assessed.
ISBN9780755977543
Official Print Publication DateNovember 2009
Website Publication DateNovember 26, 2009

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Barry McLeod and Mari Mair, RP&M Associates Ltd
ISBN 978 0 7559 7754 3 (Web only publication)
This document is also available in pdf format (1.7mb)

CONTENTS

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

1 BACKGROUND AND INTRODUCTION
Introduction
The English Experience of Re-ablement
The City of Edinburgh Council Re-ablement Service

2 THE RE-ABLEMENT SERVICE IN EDINBURGH
Introduction
What is Re-ablement?
Re-ablement Service: The Development in the South East of Edinburgh
Re-ablement Service: The Client's Journey
Summary

3 AIMS AND OBJECTIVES OF THE EVALUATION

4 METHODOLOGY
Introduction
Quantitative Methods
Qualitative Methods

5 ASSESSMENT OF THE IMPACT OF RE-ABLEMENT ON CARE REQUIREMENTS
Introduction
Re-ablement Service Impact on Hours of Care
Impact of Re-ablement on clients by referral route
Comparisons with Control Group
Comparison of Re-ablement and Control Group clients from hospital and community referral routes
Summary

6 VIEWS OF THE RE-ABLEMENT SERVICE
Introduction
Impact of Re-ablement on clients
Impact of the re-ablement service on the independent sector providers
Impact of the re-ablement service on the workforce
Impact of the re-ablement service on the speed of discharge from hospital
Summary

7 COSTS/BENEFITS OF RE-ABLEMENT
Introduction
Training Costs for Re-ablement
Costs of Control Group
Costs of Re-ablement and Control group
Re-ablement Service 6 week costs (90 clients)
Control Group 6 Week costs (90 clients)
Benefits of the Re-ablement Service
Summary

8 THE EVALUATION TOOL
Introduction
Summary

9 CONTRIBUTION OF RE-ABLEMENT TO SHIFTING THE BALANCE OF CARE

10 KEY LEARNING POINTS AND RECOMMENDATIONS
Introduction
Longer term evaluation
The hand over process
Extending the scope of Re-ablement
Minimising Disruption to Mainstream Clients

REFERENCES

APPENDIX 1: CITY OF EDINBURGH COUNCIL RE-ABLEMENT DOCUMENTATION
APPENDIX 2: PROCESS MAP OF RE-ABLEMENT SERVICE
APPENDIX 3: INTERVIEW SCHEDULES

Tables and charts
Table 2.1 New and old approaches to Community Care
Chart 2.1 CEC Re-ablement service (South East): Organisational chart
Table 2.2 Learning Outcomes
Table 2.3 Length of time in Re-ablement
Table 5.1 Clients by size of package at start of re-ablement
Table 5.2 Clients by age group
Chart 5.1 Re-ablement Clients: Start and End Hours
Table 5.3 Care requirements of re-ablement clients at the end of Re-ablement
Chart 5.2 Re-ablement Clients by referral route: start and end hours
Chart 5.3 Care requirements of Re-ablement clients with different dependency levels: Start and end hours
Table 5.4 Re-ablement clients requiring no care package at the end of the Re-ablement period, by size of start package.
Table 5.5 Re-ablement and Control Group client care hours: Mean and median
Chart 5.4 Re-ablement and Control Group clients: Start and end Hours
Table 5.6 Comparison of care requirements of Re-ablement and Control Group clients at the end of the 6 week period
Chart 5.5 Comparison of Re-ablement and Control Group clients from hospital referral route
Chart 5.6 Comparison of Re-ablement and Control Group clients from community referral route
Table 7.1 Training Costs for social care workers
Table 7.2 Comparison of Re-ablement service and Control Group costs
Chart 8 Tracking of care hours for first 3 month period: Re-ablement clients
Chart 8.2 Tracking of care hours for first 3 month period: Comparison of Re-ablement and control group clients
Chart 8.3 Tracking of care hours for first 3 Month period: Control Group Clients by referral routes

The views expressed in this report are those of the researcher and
do not necessarily represent those of the Department or Scottish Ministers.

This report is available on the Scottish Government Social Research website only
www.scotland.gov.uk/socialresearch.