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Scotland's Zero Waste Plan: Consultation

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Annex - H - Recycling: collection, awareness, infrastructure and charging

Introduction

1. This Annex provides more information on:

  • EU obligations in relation to recycling.
  • What some of these obligations mean in practice.
  • Planned work to meet the obligations.
  • Charging by local authorities.

2. Our draft Action Plan is at Annex T.

EU and domestic targets

3. Annex A to this draft Plan outlines the EU and domestic targets on recycling and reducing the amount of waste sent to landfill. Recycling targets are:

  • Article 11(1) of the revised Waste Framework Directive ( WFD) requires Member States to: This applies to all waste, not just municipal waste.

"take measures to promote high quality recycling and, to this end, shall set up separate collections of waste where technically, environmentally and economically practicable and appropriate to meet the necessary quality standards for the relevant recycling sectors".

  • Article 11(1) also lays down that:

"subject to Article 10(2), by 2015 separate collection shall be set up for at least the following: paper, metal, plastic and glass".

[Article 10(2) contains the caveat of "where technically, environmentally and economically practicable"]. This applies to all waste, not just municipal waste.

  • Article 11(2)(a) lays down a target of 50% (by weight) by 2020 in relation to:

"the preparing for re-use and the recycling of waste materials such as at least paper, metal, plastic and glass from households and possibly from other origins as far as these waste streams are similar to waste from households".

  • Article 11(2)(b) lays down a target of 70% (by weight) re-use and recycling of construction and demolition waste by 2020.
  • The Scottish Government has laid down targets on the recycling and composting of municipal waste: 40% by 2010; 50% by 2013; 60% by 2020 and 70% by 2025.

Composting, Anaerobic Digestion and the EU targets

4. The definition of "recycling" in Article 3(17) of the revised WFD is:

'recycling' means any recovery operation by which waste materials are reprocessed into products, materials or substances whether for the original or other purposes. It includes the reprocessing of organic material but does not include energy recovery and the reprocessing into materials that are to be used as fuels or for backfilling operations.

5. In the light of this:

  • waste that is disposed of to landfill after going through a composting process will not count as recycled;
  • waste that is incinerated/burnt as fuel after going through a composting process will not count as recycled;
  • waste that has gone through a composting process which is contaminated to an extent which hinders their future use - other than for subsequent waste disposal/recovery - will not count as recycled.

6. The UK is seeking clarification from the European Commission that organic waste which is reprocessed by means of anaerobic digestion ( AD) also counts as being recycled, so long as the digestate is applied on land. Clearly, for the material to count as "recycled" it must not fall into the categories outlined in paragraph 5 above. (Whilst recognising that AD is a waste management technology which, as well as generating material that can be applied on land, also has the added value of generating energy, heat and fuel).

Type of collections and Article 11(1) of the revised WFD

7. As indicated in section 3.2 of the draft Zero Waste Plan, the Scottish Government believes that Scotland should aim to meet the requirements of Article 11 in respect of all waste. The UK's interpretation of Article 11(1) of the revised WFD, and its intended implementation of its requirements, were set out in a Minutes Statement tabled at the Environment Council on 20/21 October 2008. The relevant part reads as follows:

" Collection and recycling of wastes

Recital 41 of the revised Waste Framework Directive recognises the diversity in collection and recycling systems for wastes in different Member States, which reflect what is technically, environmentally and economically practicable in the local circumstances.

In implementing the requirements of Article 11 of the revised Directive...., the United Kingdom intends to:

- encourage the separate collection of wastes where this is technically, environmentally and economically practicable, while allowing the co-mingled collection of paper, metal, plastic, glass and other recyclable materials for subsequent separation in material recycling facilities to continue after 2015 where this is the most effective means of increasing recycling rates in the local circumstances."

8. The UK's Minutes Statement was cleared in draft with the European Commission before being tabled at the Environment Council. In its letter to the UK the Commission made the following statement:

"As regards setting up separate collection of waste, Member States are obliged to fulfil this requirement as long as separate collection is technically, environmentally and economically practicable and appropriate to meet the necessary quality standards for the relevant recycling sectors. Therefore, if co-mingled collection of paper, metal, plastics, glass and other recyclable materials followed by their subsequent separation assures that the abovementioned quality standards are met and that high quality recycling is being promoted, Member States would be allowed to continue such practice."

9. The Minutes Statement clarifies that the UK's intended approach to implementing the requirements of Article 11(1) is that both kerbside sorted separate collection, and co-mingled collection for subsequent separation at a materials recycling facility ( MRF), have a role to play in the collection of recyclable materials beyond 2015.

10. As indicated in section 3.1 of the draft Zero Waste Plan, recyclate must be of a good quality to find a market and to comply with the revised WFD.

Complying with Article 11 - recycling commercial and industrial waste

11. Scottish Government will not incur significant expenditure in relation to commercial and industrial waste. The Government intends to comply with Article 14(1) of the revised WFD which lays down that:

"in accordance with the polluter-pays principle, the costs of waste management shall be borne by the original waste producer or by the current or previous waste holders".

12. However, as outlined in the draft Zero Waste Plan, Government and its agencies are taking and will take measures to increase the provision of recycling services. These measures include:

  • An analysis of existing recycling activity by SMEs and by larger companies (section 3.9 of the draft Plan)
  • Producer responsibility, including potential changes and extensions (section 3.11 of the draft Plan)
  • Voluntary agreements with industry (section 3.9 of the draft Plan)
  • The landfill tax (section 5.4 of the draft Plan)
  • Potential further landfill bans (section 5.3 of the draft Plan and Annex L)
  • Improvements to data (sections 1.5 and 1.6 of the draft Plan)
  • Improvements to the planning system (section 1.10 of the draft Plan)
  • Improvements to recycling in public places (section 3.6 of the draft Plan)
  • Better Waste Regulation (section 1.12 of the draft Plan)
  • Tailored programmes of work for key priority materials and sectors (section 3.9 of the draft Plan)

13. A number of steps have already been taken to improve recycling facilities for business. These include:

Complying with Article 11 - recycling construction and demolition waste

14. The specific target is to achieve 70% recycling and re-use by 2020. As indicated in section 3.8 of the draft Plan, we are already close to achieving this. The Government will work with Scottish Environment Protection Agency ( SEPA) to improve data in this area so we can better measure our performance in relation to the target. As outlined in section 3.8, there is existing work to improve performance:

  • Envirowise provide advice to the construction industry on resource efficiency and waste prevention.
  • The Waste and Resources Action Programme ( WRAP), working with Envirowise, have an agreement with industry to halve the amount of construction waste going to landfill by 2012.
  • WRAP have run capital grant competitions to support the provision of infrastructure to recycle and reprocess construction waste.
  • Waste Aware Scotland have established a colour coding scheme for signage on construction sites to help improve information on recycling facilities.
  • The Government is encouraging the construction industry to draw up site waste management plans on a voluntary basis.
  • There is work on the increased re-use of building materials.

15. The Demolition Protocol also provides advice and information: http://www.demolitionengineers.net/ja15/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=113:demolition-protocol&catid=1:latest-news&Itemid=50

Complying with Article 11 - recycling municipal waste.

Interpreting the target in Article 11(2)(a))

16. The Scottish Government's recycling and composting target for municipal waste for 2020 is 60%, which is higher than the 50% minimum target contained in Article 11(2)(a) of the revised WFD.

17. The background to, and the objective of, the revised WFD target are set out in Recital (41) which reads as follows:-

" In order to move towards a European recycling society with a high level of resource efficiency, targets for preparing for re-use and recycling of waste should be set. Member States maintain different approaches to the collection of household wastes and wastes of a similar nature and composition. It is therefore appropriate that such targets take account of the different collection systems in different Member States. Waste streams from other origins similar to household waste include waste referred to in entry 20 of the list established by Commission Decision 2000/532/EC."

18. The UK's interpretation of the target was set out in the Minutes Statement tabled at the Environment Council on 20/21 October 2008. The relevant part reads as follows:-

"The UK intends to:-

- apply to the totality of household waste the requirement to increase, by 2020, to a minimum of overall 50% by weight, the preparing for re-use and the recycling of waste materials from households and, possibly, similar waste streams. The four waste streams specified in paragraph 2(a) of Article 11 ( i.e. paper, metal, plastic and glass) would be included in that overall target where they originate from households but the 50% target would not apply individually to each of the specified wastes."

19. This statement clarifies the UK's intended approach to implementing the Article 11(2)(a) requirements, namely that the 50% target will be applied across all household waste streams, rather than individually to the four specified waste streams.

20. Article 11(3) of the revised WFD provides that the European Commission shall establish detailed rules on the application and calculation methods for verifying compliance with the target set in Article 11(2)(a). The Commission has indicated its intention to establish such rules by the due transposition date of 12 December 2010.

21. In the meantime, it is our view that green and food waste can and should count towards the target. The Minutes Statement quoted at paragraph 18 above makes it clear that the UK considers that the target in Article 11(2)(a) would apply to waste streams generally, and not just the specific streams mentioned. In addition, as indicated in paragraph 4 above, the definition of "recycling" in Article 3(17) of the revised WFD makes it clear that the term "includes the reprocessing of organic material" ( e.g. composting), so long as the material used is a product, is used on land, is being used for a recovery option and is not disposed of to landfill or sent to energy recovery or disposal.

22. The UK's view is supported by several statements by the European Commission. For example, the UK's Minutes Statement was cleared in draft with the Commission before being tabled at the Environment Council. In its letter to the UK the Commission made the following statement (emphasis added):-

"By 'totality' of wastes we understand the amount of both separately collected and mixed waste from these sources. Member States can add more material waste streams from household or similar wastes to this target ( e.g. bio-waste) in which case the 50% target would apply to the totality of all waste streams included."

The target in Article 11(1)

23. The target in Article 11(1) on setting up separate collections by 2015 for at least paper, metal, plastic and glass where technically, environmentally and economically practicable applies to all forms of waste, including municipal waste. In practice, local authorities across Scotland already have collections in place for householders for these materials. Tables 1 and 2, at the end of this Annex, provide more information.

Previous seminars on improving municipal recycling rates.

24. Seminars which the Scottish Government held with local authorities and others a couple of years ago produced the following recommendations.

a. Extension of roll-out of collection of recyclate from rural properties and the remainder of multi-occupancy and hard to reach properties;

b. Increasing the volume of recycling bins/containers (100 litres equivalent volume or greater per week);

c. Collecting more materials at kerbside (including plastics, cardboard and textiles where possible);

d. Improving the effective capture rate from existing and new kerbside recycling service provision through-

i. Maintenance of drip feed information campaigns
ii. Use of material specific campaigns
iii. Use of door to door Recycling Advisors to improve capture and minimise contamination;

e. Household Waste Recycling Centres ( HWRCs )

i. upgrading HWRCs - improving hard infrastructure (roads, lay-out etc)
ii. increasing provision and spatial distribution of Recycling Centres and Points where it is sensible to do so
iii. extending opening hours, signage, waste collected and staffing
iv. improving signage
v. collecting additional materials
vi. introducing meet and greet;
vii. introducing sensible charging policies for 3 rd party commercial/industrial users and improving control of incoming waste streams; and
viii. introducing re-use shops or similar. [These are designed to allow material such as furniture and toys to be used again].

f. Introducing or extending source segregated recycling service provision to commercial customers as well as internal local authority waste producers;

g. Recovering value from bulky/special uplifts; and

h. Promotion of community composting activities in rural areas and further promotion of home composting generally.

Collection systems for household waste

25. The latest information is that:

  • 11 councils collect materials source segregated.
  • 19 councils do kerbside sort
  • 18 councils undertake co-mingled collections

(The numbers add up to more than 32 as Councils will often operate more than one system, depending on local circumstances).

26. There are 40 receptacles used across the local authority areas. However, they fall broadly under 8 types (without taking into account variations in colour). These include:

  • Recycling bags/sacks (Blue, clear, green, purple, red, white, Salvation Army bag).
  • Battery recycling bags
  • Basket (Blue)
  • Kitchen caddy
  • 55 litre box (Black, blue, green, red, orange)
  • 140 litre bin (Burgundy, blue, green)
  • 240 litre bin (Blue-lidded, Brown-lidded, blue, green, brown, dark grey)
  • Communal recycling point (Red-lidded, blue-lidded, communal)

27. As indicated in paragraphs 7 to 9 above, the UK has made it clear that both source segregated collections and co-mingled collections have a role to play in relation to meeting EU targets. The Scottish Government further considers that:

  • whilst the geography of Scotland means that there will never be uniform collection systems across the country, there is some scope for rationalisation and uniformity of approach.
  • the quality of the material sent for recycling must be high, with minimum contamination, to achieve higher prices for the recyclate, to avoid material rejection by the reprocessor and to comply with the revised WFD.
  • when considering costs of providing recycling collections, local authorities will wish to consider all costs and not just some of them.

28. Where material is collected co-mingled, it requires to be sorted at a Material Recycling Facility ( MRF). MRFs in Scotland currently process around 19% of the material recovered for recycling. However, capacity is limited and utilises older technology. WRAP are currently providing support to existing operations to improve quality and throughput. REMADE have identified that if all the Councils currently considering moving to co-mingled collections actually do, total MRF capacity would need to be doubled.

Collections for flats

29. 38% of Scotland's dwellings are flats: http://www.gro-scotland.gov.uk/files2/stats/gros-estimates-of-households-and-dwellings-in-scotland-2008/j1080810.htm This makes a collection at the main door of the residence very difficult, if not impossible. In recognition of this, the previous Scottish Executive funded trials and research on recycling in multi-occupancy properties: http://www.scotland.gov.uk/Publications/2006/08/01104543/0 This concluded that multi-occupancy recycling schemes will need to be implemented with consideration of the existing residual collection system and the predominant type of multi-occupancy property ( e.g. high-rise blocks, tenements, low-rise blocks). WRAP has also published guidance on flat recycling: http://www.wrap.org.uk/local_authorities/research_guidance/collections_recycling/recycling_collections_for_flats/

Frequency of collections for residual waste

30. A number of local authorities across Scotland, and elsewhere in the UK, have chosen to introduce alternate weekly collections of residual waste. Local authorities have a duty to collect household waste under section 45 of the Environmental Protection Act 1990 but this lays down nothing on the frequency of collections, which is entirely a matter for local authorities.

31. Studies undertaken by REMADE Scotland indicate that collection schemes with fortnightly residual collections produce 83% more dry recyclate than those with weekly residual collections: http://www.remade.org.uk/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=140&Itemid=349

Charging by local authorities for collections

32. Under section 45 of the Environmental Protection Act 1990, the following charging regime is in place in relation to the collection of waste by local authorities:

Type of service

Charging regime

Direct variable charging for household waste ( i.e. the amount charged by local authorities varies depending on the amount of waste produced).

Not allowed in Scotland under the existing legislation.

Specific charges for the collection (only) of certain types of household waste,

Allowed in cases prescribed in regulations - see below.

Collection and disposal of commercial waste.

Authorities expected to recover a reasonable charge which they may waive at their discretion, although full recovery of costs is generally expected.

Collection and disposal of industrial waste

Authorities have to recover a reasonable charge, which they may not waive.

33. One set of regulations (the Controlled Waste Regulations 1992) have been made, empowering local authorities to charge for the collection of certain types of household waste. These Regulations may be found at: http://www.opsi.gov.uk/SI/si1992/Uksi_19920588_en_1.htm

34. Schedule 1 to these Regulations lays down that certain types of waste shall be regarded as household waste and schedule 2 lays down the types of waste for which a charge for collection shall be made.

35 The Scottish Government, working with the Convention of Scottish Local Authorities, is reviewing the charging elements of these regulations and will consult on potential changes.

Community composting

36. The Community Recycling Network for Scotland ( CRNS) also supports community composting projects. These projects not only divert valuable organic materials (garden or food waste) from the waste stream, but they also collect and compost these materials locally so they can be used as a resource for the local community.

37. The CRNS also manages the Compost Doctors Scotland project, a pilot programme, to help public and private organisations, such as hotels, restaurants, schools and hospitals, to compost food and/or garden waste on site.

Advice to householders

38. For recycling collections to succeed, participants must know when material is being collected; what material is being collected; and how material should be presented for collection. It will also encourage participation rates and volumes ( i.e. capture) if householders know why material is being collected and what happens to it after collection. Public information on "waste journeys" is already available at http://www.wasteawarescotland.org.uk/html/recycle.asp

39. On-going provision of advice and information at a local level to recyclers, and motivating non-committed recyclers to take part in recycling, is crucial in relation to:

  • maintaining and optimising participation ( i.e. how many householders take part);
  • optimising capture rate ( i.e. that when householders participate as much as possible of the material which can be recycled is put in recycling bins rather than residual bins) and;
  • maintaining high quality materials (as required by the Waste Framework Directive) and reducing contamination ( i.e. ensuring that the correct material is put in the correct bin so that the reprocessing industry can turn the material into new products).
  • Increasing the range of materials that can be recycled ( e.g. the introduction of food waste collections; collections of mixed plastics; etc.).

40. The main reasons why people currently recycle at kerbside are for:

  • environmental reasons
  • service provision
  • reduces waste in the residual waste bin
  • convenience
  • instructed to recycle

41. The main environmental reasons given for recycling are that recycling has the following benefits:

  • reduces the need for landfill
  • saves resources
  • reduces global warming

42. Suggestions by the public for improvements to services tend to be:

  • Collect more materials
  • More frequent collections of recyclate
  • Increase general waste collection frequency.
  • Alternative container types (to include larger containers and additional containers)
  • Extension of garden waste collection season
  • Better designed lids

43. The main reasons why people currently recycle at Recycling Centres and Points are:

  • convenience
  • environmental reasons
  • reduces waste in the residual waste bin.

44. Suggestions by the public for improvements to Recycling Centres and Points tend to be:

  • collect more materials.
  • provision of additional containers.
  • more frequent emptying of points.
  • longer opening hours at Recycling Centres.
  • better lighting and site maintenance.
  • more information about accepted materials.

Source Waste Aware Scotland (2009): Analysis of 12 Scottish local authority surveys (2006 - 2009)

45. Looking ahead, future needs in relation to advice to householders are likely to relate to:

  • Continuing to outline why recycling is a positive thing to do and what the benefits of recycling are. This advice should reinforce the main reasons why people currently recycle, and what the environmental benefits of recycling are. This should provide further information on resource efficiency, the carbon benefits and the reduction of waste to landfill.
  • Further material specific campaigns by individual local authorities to increase capture for certain materials, if waste compositional analysis indicates that these materials are still ending up in the residual bin. This could build on materials specific waste journey information and increase awareness of the carbon savings that could be made by individual householders as a result of material specific recycling (eg the carbon benefits of recycling aluminium).
  • On-going local campaigns, to continue to remind householders of the services that are available; to clarify what can/cannot be recycled; to advise when materials are collected; to optimise capture from existing services; to give thanks and provide feedback to householders on how they are performing; to advise on the wider benefits of recycling (including specific carbon based information) and on the "waste journeys" for the materials collected.
  • Information on how much of each recyclate can be collected. (The trials on collecting food waste for composting suggest that many householders do not consider that they produce enough recyclate whereas, in fact, collecting their material helps to meet the overall objective of increasing recycling).
  • Campaigns when services change (eg more materials collected or dates of collection change).
  • Understanding what the perceived barriers or improvements are for engagement in recycling, and ensuring communication strategies identify and address these issues.
  • More signage at Household Waste Recycling Centres and more information from and for staff, to divert waste from the landfill bin to the recycling bins.
  • More information for SMEs on what access business can have to Household Waste Recycling Centres.
  • In-depth intervention at a local level to tackle particular problems relating to low participation, poor capture rate and contamination.
  • Ensuring that the reprocessor passes information back to the seller of the recyclate who in turn will need to provide advice and information to the originator of the recyclate.
  • Establishing Zero Waste communities, to encourage householders to further engage in recycling behaviour at a local level. (The CRNS are currently developing a "Community Toolkit for Zero Waste Communities".)

46. On in-depth intervention at a local level, Waste Aware Scotland have adopted a recycling adviser model. More information can be found at http://www.wasteawarescotland.org.uk/pdf/Scottish%20Government%20Recycling%20Advisor%20Report.pdf

Markets for recyclate collected from municipal waste

47. On the whole, the prices of recyclate track very closely the prices for the equivalent virgin material.

48. Scotland is dependent on markets south of the border or overseas for much of its material. The table below shows how much of the material collected from local authorities is reprocessed in Scotland, rest of the UK and overseas.

Material

Municipal Waste
(Tonnes)

Recycled in Scotland (%)

Recycled elsewhere in the UK (%)

Exported (%)

News & Pams (Periodicals, magazines)

140,545

0

Over 95

Mixed Paper & Card

113,661

28

2

36 China

22 Indonesia

Wood

56,387

100

70% Panel Board Manufacture

0

0

30% biomass, bedding, mulch

Green waste

296,827

10

0

0

Glass

101,930

100

44% Container Manufacture

0

0

25% Insulation

12% Highway marking

10% Aggregates

9% Other

Steel Cans

3,491

0

100

Materials now a feedstock although finally converted to product elsewhere

Aluminium Cans

929

0

100

Mixed Cans

7,568

0

100

Plastics

14,716

0

30

36% Hong Kong

25% China

39% Netherlands

Electronics

High

Fridges/freezers

9,422

100

However scrap steel likely to be exported

Textiles

14,379

17% Recycled in UK

13% Re-used in UK

54: Africa, Asia, Middle East & Eastern Europe

Rubble

126,970

100

0

0

Source: REMADE Scotland

49. The Scottish Government is committed to increasing the reprocessing of recyclate in Scotland, where that is economic and practicable. Therefore, the Scottish Government has, for example, supported capital grant schemes by WRAP to increase Scottish reprocessing infrastructure in areas such as plastics and food waste. More collections, and reprocessing, of plastics and food waste will be required to enable Scotland to meet the longer term targets on the recycling of municipal waste.

50. Looking ahead, key actions in relation to markets for recyclate are likely to be:

  • Increased emphasis on sustainable procurement, ensuring that the public sector, private sector and the third sector specify recyclate, and re-used products, in tender documents. This is in line with EU policy: http://ec.europa.eu/environment/gpp/guideline_en.htm
  • Continued information on flows of recyclate.
  • Continued information on prices.
  • The publication of an annual report on the state of recycling markets in Scotland.
  • The production of a Market Development Plan, which will review and identify further opportunities for specific markets in Scotland. This will look beyond the traditional materials and specifically target commercial and industrial waste types.
  • Better Regulation, including the production at EU, UK and Scottish levels on end of waste criteria outlining when certain specified wastes shall cease to be waste, as envisaged in Article 6(1) of the revised WFD.

Regulation of exports

51. The legislation on Transfrontier Shipment of Waste ( TFS) is a reserved matter.

52. SEPA is the competent authority for the TFS regime in Scotland. It uses an intelligence-led approach to target its enforcement efforts. This involves working with other UK and European regulatory authorities, such as the Environment Agency, UK Border Agency and VROM (Dutch Inspectorate) and industry.

53. SEPA undertakes regular port inspections, roadside checks, site inspections and data checks to discharge its duties under the European Waste Shipment Regulation and to improve understanding of why and how illegal shipments take place. This enables SEPA to intervene with the appropriate level of enforcement action to disrupt and minimise this trade. Enforcement can range from the provision of advice to bring operators back into compliance through to formal legal proceedings.54. SEPA's enforcement priorities currently focus on the illegal shipment of:

  • 'notifiable' waste masquerading as 'green list' waste or 'non-waste'.
  • 'notifiable waste' (particularly hazardous) without prior notification and consent.
  • waste going to developing countries that have not elected to receive it.

55. More information on the regulation of waste exports can be found at:

http://www.sepa.org.uk/waste/waste_regulation/transfrontier_shipment.aspx and

http://www.environment-agency.gov.uk/research/library/data/97808.aspx

The Scottish Government
August 2009

Table 1. Kerbside collection by local authorities of key materials

Local Authority

Aerosols

Aluminium Cans

Steel Cans

Plastic Bottles

Glass Bottles & Jars

Paper

Aberdeen City

YES

YES

YES

YES

YES

Aberdeenshire

YES

YES

YES

YES

YES

Angus

YES

YES

YES

YES

YES

YES

Argyll & Bute

YES

YES

YES

YES

YES

YES

Clackmannanshire

YES

YES

YES

YES

YES

YES

Dumfries & Galloway

YES

Dundee

YES

YES

YES

YES

East Ayrshire

YES

YES

YES

YES

YES

East Dunbartonshire

YES

YES

YES

YES

YES

YES

East Lothian

YES

YES

YES

YES

YES

YES

East Renfrewshire

YES

YES

YES

YES

YES

Edinburgh City

YES

YES

YES

YES

YES

Falkirk

YES

YES

YES

YES

Fife

YES

Glasgow City

YES

YES

YES

YES

Highland

YES

YES

YES

YES

YES

Inverclyde

YES

YES

YES

YES

Midlothian

YES

YES

YES

YES

YES

Moray

YES

YES

YES

YES

YES

North Ayrshire

YES

YES

YES

YES

YES

YES

North Lanarkshire

YES

YES

YES

YES

YES

YES

Orkney

YES

YES

Perth & Kinross

YES

YES

YES

YES

Renfrewshire

YES

YES

YES

YES

YES

Scottish Borders

YES

YES

YES

YES

YES

Shetland

YES

YES

YES

YES

South Ayrshire

YES

YES

YES

YES

YES

South Lanarkshire

YES

YES

YES

YES

Stirling

YES

YES

YES

YES

YES

YES

West Dunbartonshire

YES

YES

YES

West Lothian

YES

YES

YES

YES

Western Isles

YES

YES

YES

YES

YES

Table 2: Recycling centres and points for key materials

Local Authority

Aerosols

Aluminium Cans

Steel Cans

Plastic Bottles

Glass Bottles & Jars

Paper

Aberdeen City

0

40

39

38

39

64

Aberdeenshire

0

172

171

170

174

168

Angus

45

45

45

38

57

11

Argyll & Bute

0

91

91

84

96

68

Clackmannanshire

0

13

13

2

14

7

Dumfries & Galloway

71

114

112

6

164

53

Dundee

0

33

32

19

99

101

East Ayrshire

1

31

31

24

31

8

East Dunbartonshire

0

19

19

15

20

17

East Lothian

77

77

77

4

73

40

East Renfrewshire

0

14

11

13

13

12

Edinburgh City

383

385

389

337

87

418

Falkirk

2

89

89

2

90

2

Fife

0

305

305

275

308

169

Glasgow City

0

330

329

328

164

330

Highland

0

204

202

12

214

205

Inverclyde

0

29

29

29

41

29

Midlothian

0

24

24

0

27

25

Moray

65

65

65

4

74

41

North Ayrshire

0

29

22

23

44

35

North Lanarkshire

0

29

26

6

64

13

Orkney

0

17

17

0

17

15

Perth & Kinross

63

64

64

8

66

62

Renfrewshire

0

33

32

5

35

31

Scottish Borders

0

6

0

0

68

6

Shetland

0

31

31

1

36

3

South Ayrshire

0

30

30

0

37

6

South Lanarkshire

0

24

24

2

71

31

Stirling

0

17

17

1

34

30

West Dunbartonshire

0

42

42

32

44

33

West Lothian

0

8

8

6

34

6

Western Isles

0

50

50

50

50

8

TOTAL

707

2460

2436

1534

2385

2047

The Scottish Government
August 2009