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Growing Up in Scotland: Parenting and the Neighbourhood Context Report

DescriptionThis report uses data from the Growing Up in Scotland study (GUS) to explore families’ experiences of living in Scotland’s neighbourhoods,
ISBN9780755919703
Official Print Publication Date
Website Publication DateMarch 18, 2009

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Paul Bradshaw*, Clare Sharp*, Catriona Webster* and ^Lynn Jamieson
*Scottish Centre for Social Research, ^Centre for Research on Families and Relationships

Prepared for The Scottish Government: Children, Young People and Social Care Directorate by the Scottish Centre for Social Research

ISBN 978 0 7559 1970 3 (Web only publication)

This document is also available in pdf format (2.4mb)
This research findings is also accompanied by five reports & research findings,
Report 1, Non resident Parent Report, Research findings 1/2009,
Report 2, Food Activity Report, Research findings 2/2009,
Research Findings 3/2009,
Report 4, Multiple childcare provision amongst families Report, Research findings 4/2009,
Report 5, The impact of children's early activities on cognitive development Report, Research Findings 5/2009

Contents

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

1 INTRODUCTION

2 AREA SATISFACTION AND USE AND PERCEPTIONS OF LOCAL SERVICES AND FACILITIES
2.1 Key findings
2.2 Overall satisfaction with area
2.3 Availability and use of local facilities and services
2.4 Assessment of local facilities
2.5 Satisfaction with facilities overall
2.6 Service/issue most in need of improvement
2.7 Perceptions of safety in local area

3 SOCIAL NETWORKS
3.1 Key findings
3.2 Variations in social networks
3.2.1 Variation by selected individual or household characteristics
3.2.2 Variation by area deprivation and urban-rural characteristics
3.2.3 Variation by length of residence and neighbourhood satisfaction
3.3 The relative effects of area and individual characteristics on having satisfactory networks

4 CHILD-FRIENDLINESS OF LOCAL AREA
4.1 Key findings
4.2 Responses to the individual statements
4.3 Variations in perceived child-friendliness
4.3.1 Variations by area deprivation and urban-rural characteristics
4.3.2 Variation by length of residence, neighbourhood satisfaction and rating of local facilities
4.4 Factors independently associated with perceived levels of child-friendliness
4.5 What makes an area 'child-friendly'?

5 ARE AREA CHARACTERISTICS RELATED TO PARENTING BEHAVIOUR?
5.1 Key findings
5.2 Variety of parent-child activities
5.3 Attendance at parent-baby/parent-toddler groups
5.4 Attitudes towards seeking help and advice
5.5 Number of sources used for information and advice on child health

6 CONCLUSION

REFERENCES

APPENDIX A: REGRESSION TABLES