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Evidence on Tackling Hard to Treat Properties

DescriptionA report on best practice in tackling Hard to Treat properties, with a particular emphasis on addressing fuel poverty and carbon emissions.
ISBN9780755972623
Official Print Publication DateOctober 2008
Website Publication DateOctober 17, 2008

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Prof Susan Roaf, Dr Keith Baker and Andrew Peacock
School of the Built Environment, Heriot Watt University and SISTech Ltd
ISBN 978 0 7559 7262 3 (Web only publication)
ISSN 0950 2254
This document is also available in pdf format (692k)

CONTENTS

Glossary

Executive Summary

Summary of Recommendations for Hard to Treat Properties

1 Introduction

2 Background
2.1 Definition of Hard to Treat Properties
2.2 Hard to Treat Properties in the Scottish Housing Stock

3 Options for Treating Hard to Treat Properties
3.1 Solid Wall Properties
3.1.1 Solid Wall Insulation Measures
3.1.2 Case Study: Technological Intervention to a Detached Victorian Property
3.2 Tenements
3.2.1 Technical solutions for improving the energy efficiency of tenements
3.2.2 Economic solutions for improving the energy efficiency of tenements
3.2.3 Social solutions for improving the energy efficiency of tenements
3.3 High Rise Properties
3.3.1 Technical solutions for improving energy efficiency of high rise blocks
3.3.2 Case Study: Aberdeen City Council
3.3.3 Economic solutions for improving the energy efficiency of high rise buildings
3.3.4 Case Study: South Ayrshire Council
3.3.5 Social solutions for improving energy efficiency in high rise blocks
3.4 Timber Frame Properties pre-1982
3.5 Properties with Flat Roofs
3.6 Properties with Mansard Roofs
3.7 Park Homes and Residential Mobile Homes
3.7.1 Insulation Options for Park Homes

4 Improvements Applicable to Most or All Hard to Treat Properties
4.1 Insulation
4.2 Windows and Glazing
4.2.1 Replacement with Modern Double or Triple Glazing
4.2.2 Secondary Glazing
4.2.3 Reinstating or Adding Internal Shutters
4.2.4 Draughtproofing
4.3 Heating Systems and Controls
4.4 Lighting and Appliances
4.5 Smart Meters
4.6 CHP and Renewable Energy

5 Summary of New Research into Options for Improving Hard to Treat Properties
5.1 Innovative Advanced Surface Treatments
5.2 Non-wall Technological Research
5.3 Measuring, Modelling, Mapping and Managing Energy Consumption by Scottish Households

6 Recommendations for Hard to Treat Properties
6.1 Solid Wall Properties
6.2 Tenements
6.3 High Rise Properties
6.4 Timber Frame Properties pre-1982
6.5 Flat Roof Properties
6.6 Properties with Mansard Roofs
6.7 Park Homes and Residential Mobile Homes
6.8 Improvements Applicable to All or Most Hard to Treat Properties

7 Conclusions

8 About the Authors
8.1 Acknowledgements

9 References

Appendix A Case Study: Interventions to Three Tenement Blocks

List of Figures

Figure 1: Attribution of CO2 emissions to different end use technologies and building elements in a Victorian detached dwelling of 144m 2 floor area
Figure 2: Intervention set for a Victorian detached dwelling of floor area 144m 2 that excludes modification of external wall

List of Tables

Table 1: Scottish Housing Stock 2003/2004
Table 2: Heating energy savings from whole block improvements to tenements
Table 3: Example Savings from Improvements to Individual Tenement Flats
Table 4: Improvements in the U-values of the refurbished envelope of a concrete frame and in-fill panel high rise block in Birmingham
Table 5: Appraisal of option table on which the choices at Stockethill were made
Table 6: Savings for a 30 Flat, 6 floor development
Table 7: Savings from Insulating Flat Roofs
Table 8: Comparison of U-values for park homes and other domestic properties
Table 9: Examples of Yearly Savings from Insulating Park Homes
Table 10: Insulation Options for Hard to Treat Properties
Table 11: Costs and Benefits of Installing Double Glazing
Table 12: Costs and Benefits of Installing Secondary Glazing
Table 13: Savings from Common Energy Efficiency Upgrades for Lighting and Appliances

The views expressed in this report are those of the researcher and
do not necessarily represent those of the Department or Scottish Ministers.

This report is available on the Scottish Government Social Research website only
www.scotland.gov.uk/socialresearch.