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Growing Up In Scotland Study: Growing Up In Rural Scotland

DescriptionThis report uses data from the Growing up in Scotland ( GUS) study to explore what is distinctive about growing up in rural, remote and small-town Scotland in comparison with urban Scotland. Findings are based on the first sweep of GUS, which involved interviews with the main carers of 5,217 children aged 0-1 years old and 2,859 children aged 2-3 years old, carried out between April 2005 and March 2006.
ISBN978 0 7559 7013
Official Print Publication Date
Website Publication DateMarch 14, 2008

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Lynn Jamieson, Centre for Research on Families and Relationships, University of Edinburgh with Paul Bradshaw and Rachel Ormston, Scottish Centre for Social Research
ISBN 978 0 7559 7013 1 (Web only publication)
This document is also available in pdf format (412k)

This report is also accompanied by two further reports,
Exploring The Experience and Outcomes For Advantaged and Disadvantaged Families and
Use of Informal Support By Families With Young Children

CONTENTS

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
Family circumstances of urban and rural babies and toddlers
Health and wellbeing of rural babies and toddlers
Child friendly areas?
Service use
Conclusion

CHAPTER ONE INTRODUCTION
About the Growing Up in Scotland ( GUS) study
Policy background
Structure of the report
Defining urban and rural areas
Key issues in analysis of urban-rural differences

CHAPTER TWO FAMILY CIRCUMSTANCES OF URBAN AND RURAL BABIES AND TODDLERS
Introduction
Age of mother
First child?
Family structure
Parents' education
Parents' employment
Family income and resources

CHAPTER THREE HEALTH AND WELL-BEING OF RURAL BABIES AND CHILDS
Introduction
Birth weight
Reported health problems or disabilities
Contact with NHS for health problems
Parental concerns about child's development
Health-influencing behaviour
Conclusion

CHAPTER FOUR CHILD FRIENDLY AREAS?
Introduction
Access to grandparents
Access to informal support and advice
Contact with other children
Conclusion

CHAPTER FIVE SERVICE USE
Introduction
Ante-natal classes
Information and advice during pregnancy
Childcare
Awareness of government initiatives

CHAPTER SIX CONCLUSION

REFERENCES

LIST OF TABLES
Table 1 Number of Live Births per 1000 women 2001 by area urban-rural classification (source: Registrar General)
Table 2 Relative proportions of Scottish children across urban-rural areas: Growing Up in Scotland ( GUS) sample and census data
Table 3 Age of mother at birth of first child by urban-rural
Table 4 Mothers/respondents who were first time mothers by urban-rural
Table 5 Family structure by urban-rural
Table 6 Respondents/main carers' educational qualifications by urban-rural
Table 7 Children in households with no parent or carer working by urban-rural
Table 8 Mothers working status by urban-rural
Table 9 Children living in households in different income bands by urban-rural
Table 10 Children living in households with particular resources by urban-rural
Table 11 Percentage of babies with low birth weights by urban-rural
Table 12 Percentage who had one or more accidents involving medical attention by urban-rural
Table 13 Percentage of children for whom no concerns are reported concerning their development or behaviour by urban-rural
Table 14 Percentage of respondents saying they planned to breast feed before the baby was born by urban-rural
Table 15 Percentage of respondents saying they ever breastfed by urban-rural
Table 16 Percentage of respondents/main carers who smoke by urban-rural
Table 17 Percentage of babies and toddlers with few books (0-10 books) for them at home by urban-rural
Table 18 Percentage of babies and toddlers who did not watch any TV in the past week by urban-rural
Table 19 Percentage of children with at least one grandparent within a 20-30 minute drive by urban-rural
Table 20 Percentage of children reported as having a close or very close relationship with at least one grandparent by urban-rural
Table 21 Who mothers or main carers would call on first when needing help
Table 22 Percentage of respondents/main carers who has any friends or family with medical knowledge or training from whom they would feel comfortable asking for advice
Table 23 Frequency of toddlers being taken to visit friends with young children
Table 24 Percentage who have regularly attended a mother toddler group in the last year
Table 25 Percentage of first-time mothers in the birth cohort who did not attend any ante-natal classes by urban-rural
Table 26 Reasons for non-attendance given by first-time mothers in the birth cohort who did not attend any ante-natal classes by urban-rural
Table 27 Percentage of mothers (birth cohort, excluding first time mothers) using different sources of help, information or advice during pregnancy by SE urban rural classification
Table 28 Percentage of respondents/main carers who get help with childcare on a regular basis from any of a list of the main formal and informal sources of help
Table 29 Percentage of mothers/main carers, birth cohort, who do not get help with childcare on a regular basis giving various reasons for not using childcare
Table 30 Percentage of families in the birth cohort who are using childcare, who currently use various types of childcare
Table 31 Percentage of families in the child cohort who are using childcare who currently use various types of childcare
Table 32 Percentage of mothers/carers citing child-centred reasons for use of childcare (mothers who use childcare)

It should be noted that since this research was commissioned a new Scottish government has been formed, which means that the report reflects commitments and strategic objectives conceived under the previous administration. The policies, strategies, objectives and commitments referred to in this report should not therefore be treated as current Government policy.

The views expressed in this report are those of the researcher and
do not necessarily represent those of the Department or Scottish Ministers.

This report is available on the Scottish Government Social Research website only
www.scotland.gov.uk/socialresearch.