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Growing Up In Scotland Study: Use of Informal Support By Families With Young Children

DescriptionThis report, which draws on data from the first sweep of the Growing Up in Scotland study, starts from the position that in order to understand the types of formal support services that parents of young children require, the extent to which parents have access to, and draw upon, informal sources of support must also be understood.
ISBN978 0 7559 7012
Official Print Publication Date
Website Publication DateMarch 14, 2008

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Paul Bradshaw, Scottish Centre for Social Research with Lynn Jamieson and Fran Wasoff, Centre for Research on Families and Relationships
ISBN 978 0 7559 7012 4 (Web only publication)
This document is also available in pdf format (244k)

This is also accompanied by two further reports,
Exploring The Experience and Outcomes For Advantaged and Disadvantaged Families and
Growing Up In Scotland Study: Growing Up In Rural Scotland

CONTENTS

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

CHAPTER ONE INTRODUCTION
Introduction
Background
About the study
Format of the report

CHAPTER TWO ATTITUDES TOWARDS SEEKING HELP AND/OR ADVICE

CHAPTER THREE AVAILABILITY OF SOURCES OF INFORMAL SUPPORT
Introduction
Other adults in the household
Contact with child's grandparents
Proximity of child's grandparents
Friends and family with medical knowledge or training
Friends and family with young children
Index of availability of informal support

CHAPTER FOUR USING SOURCES OF INFORMAL SUPPORT
Introduction
Mother and child groups
Informal advice during pregnancy
Information on child health
Information on child behaviour
Use of informal childcare provision
Index of use of informal support

CHAPTER FIVE SUPPORT FROM THE CHILD'S GRANDPARENTS

CHAPTER SIX CONCLUSION

REFERENCES

ANNEX A - MULTI-VARIATE ANALYSIS RESULTS
Description of the analysis
Results

LIST OF TABLES
Table 1 Attitudes towards seeking help and/or advice by cohort
Table 2 Scaled attitudes towards seeking help by key independent variables: birth cohort
Table 3 Number of adults other than respondent in the household by cohort
Table 4 Number of child's grandparents that the family are in contact with by cohort
Table 5 Proportion of grandparents that the family are in contact with by cohort and age of mother at birth of cohort child)
Table 6 Scaled availability of sources of informal support by key independent variables: birth cohort
Table 7 Types of informal sources used for advice during pregnancy by cohort and age of mother at birth of sample child
Table 8 Types of informal sources used for information about child health by cohort and age of mother at birth of sample child
Table 9 Type of informal source used for information about child behaviour by age of mother at birth of sample child
Table 10 Scores on index of use of informal support by cohort
Table 11 Scaled use of sources of informal support by key independent variables: birth cohort
Table 12 Nature and frequency of support from child's grandparents by cohort
Table 13 Score on 'variety' of grandparent support index by cohort
Table 14 Scaled use of grandparental support by key independent variables: birth cohort
Table A1 Logitistic regression model detailing factors related to having most difficulty seeking help or support: birth cohort
Table A2 Logitistic regression model detailing factors related to low access to sources of informal support: birth cohort
Table A3 Logitistic regression model detailing factors related to low use of sources of informal support: birth cohort
Table A4 Logitistic regression model detailing factors related to receiving a low-level of support from the child's grandparents: birth cohort

It should be noted that since this research was commissioned a new Scottish government has been formed, which means that the report reflects commitments and strategic objectives conceived under the previous administration. The policies, strategies, objectives and commitments referred to in this report should not therefore be treated as current Government policy.

The views expressed in this report are those of the researcher and
do not necessarily represent those of the Department or Scottish Ministers.

This report is available on the Scottish Government Social Research website only
www.scotland.gov.uk/socialresearch.