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Growing Up in Scotland: Year 2: Results from the second year of a study following the lives of Scotland's children

DescriptionGrowing Up in Scotland is a major longitudinal study launched in 2005 with the aim of tracking a group of children and their families from the early years, through childhood and beyond. Funded by the Scottish Government , its main aim is to provide information to support policy-making, but it is also intended to be a broader resource that can be drawn on by academics, voluntary sector organisations and other interested parties. This report provides information from the second sweep of the su
ISBN978 0 7559 5660
Official Print Publication Date
Website Publication DateFebruary 18, 2008

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Growing up in Scotland: Sweep 2 Overview Report

Paul Bradshaw*, Sarah Cunningham-Burley^, Fiona Dobbie*, Andy MacGregor*, Louise Marryat*, Rachel Ormston* and Fran Wasoff^
*Scottish Centre for Social Research
^Centre for Research on Families and Relationships

ISBN 978 0 7559 5660 9

This document is also available in pdf format (1.2MB)

This full Report is also accompanied by Research Findings
Research findings 1/2008
Research findings 2/2008
Research findings 3/2008
and Research findings 4/2008

Contents

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

1 INTRODUCTION
1.1 About the Growing Up in Scotland study
1.2 The GUS cohorts
1.3 Fieldwork at sweep 1
1.4 Fieldwork at sweep 2
1.5 Content of the report
1.6 Next steps
1.7 A note on the interpretation and presentation of results

2 FAMILY CIRCUMSTANCES
2.1 Introduction
2.1.1 Types of analysis
2.2 Family characteristics
2.2.1 Family type
2.2.2 Number of children in household
2.2.3 Non-resident parents
2.3 Employment and NS-SEC
2.3.1 Household employment
2.3.2 Maternal employment
2.3.3 Socio-economic classification ( NS-SEC)
2.4 Income
2.4.1 Household income
2.4.2 Benefits and tax credits
2.5 Key points
2.6 Conclusion

3 HOUSING, NEIGHBOURHOOD AND COMMUNITY
3.1 Introduction
3.1.1 Types of analysis
3.2 Housing and material goods
3.2.1 Ownership of cars and selected consumer goods
3.2.2 Moving home
3.3 Neighbourhood and community
3.3.1 Facilities used in the local area
3.3.2 Facilities in most need of improvement
3.3.3 Involvement in local groups for children or parents
3.3.4 Involvement in other local groups
3.4 Key points
3.5 Conclusion

4 FOOD AND EATING
4.1 Introduction
4.2 Eating habits and special diets
4.3 Main and evening meals
4.4 Types of food eaten
4.4.1 Fruit
4.4.2 Vegetables
4.4.3 'Unhealthy' foods
4.4.4 Difficulty in controlling the amount of sugary snacks/drinks children have
4.4.5 Effects on what children have to eat
4.5 Snacks
4.6 Sources of help/advice on children's diets, eating habits or healthy eating
4.7 Key points
4.8 Conclusion

5 ACTIVITIES WITH OTHERS
5.1 Introduction
5.1.1 Types of analysis
5.2 Visiting/being visited by other people
5.3 Activities
5.3.1 Literacy
5.3.2 Educational activities
5.3.3 Painting and drawing
5.3.4 Singing
5.3.5 Using a computer
5.3.6 Television
5.3.7 Outdoor activity
5.4 Places and events
5.5 Satisfaction with range of activities
5.6 Key points
5.7 Conclusion

6 CHILD HEALTH AND DEVELOPMENT
6.1 Introduction
6.1.1 Types of analysis
6.2 General health of children
6.2.1 Parental perceptions of health of children
6.2.2 Long-standing illness and disabilities
6.3 Health problems since sweep 1 interview
6.4 Accidents and injuries requiring NHS contact
6.4.1 Use of Accident and Emergency departments
6.5 Anthropometric measurements, overweight and obesity
6.5.1 Response to anthropometric measures
6.5.2 Variations in BMI, and in overweight and obesity prevalence, by demographic and socio-economic chracteristics
6.6 Contact with health professionals
6.7 Dental health
6.8 Sources of help, information and advice on child's health
6.9 Child development
6.9.1 Concerns about child's development and behaviour
6.9.2 Speech and language development
6.9.3 Development scales
6.10 Key points
6.11 Conclusion

7 PARENTING STYLES AND PARENTING RESPONSIBILITIES
7.1 Introduction
7.1.1 Types of analysis
7.2 Parenting techniques
7.2.1 Awareness of different techniques
7.2.2 Use of different techniques
7.2.3 Smacking
7.2.4 Usefulness of other techniques
7.3 Parent-child activities
7.3.1 Variations in parental activities with children
7.4 Household division of labour
7.4.1 Main respondents' views - sweep 1 and sweep 2
7.4.2 Comparison of main respondents' and partners' views
7.5 Key points
7.6 Conclusion

8 PARENTAL SUPPORT
8.1 Introduction
8.1.1 Types of analysis
8.2 Informal social networks
8.2.1 Number of close relationships
8.2.2 Closeness to family
8.2.3 Closeness to friends
8.2.4 Perceived level of support from family and friends
8.2.5 The relationship between informal support and emotional wellbeing
8.3 Access to informal support
8.3.1 Leaving the child with someone for a couple of hours during the day
8.3.2 Leaving the child with someone for a whole day
8.3.3 Leaving the child with someone overnight
8.3.4 Main source of informal support/short-notice childcare
8.4 Attendance at groups and classes for parents and children
8.4.1 Parent and child/toddler groups
8.4.2 Parenting classes
8.5 Use of formal support and professional advice on parenting issues
8.5.1 Attitudes towards parenting advice/support given by professionals
8.5.2 Use of formal support services
8.6 Key points
8.7 Conclusion

9 CHILDCARE AND WORK-LIFE BALANCE
9.1 Introduction
9.1.1 Types of analysis
9.2 Use of childcare
9.3 Types of childcare used
9.3.1 Number of different providers
9.3.2 Formal and informal provision
9.3.3 Detailed childcare type
9.4 Number of hours and days per week
9.5 Cost of childcare
9.5.1 Average weekly cost
9.5.2 Coping with childcare costs
9.6 Changes to arrangements, degree of choice, ease of arranging childcare and childcare preferences
9.6.1 Changes to arrangements between sweeps
9.6.2 Degree of choice
9.6.3 Ease of arranging childcare
9.6.4 Childcare preferences
9.7 Work-life balance and family-friendly working
9.7.1 Attitudes towards work-life balance
9.7.2 Employer family-friendly policies
9.8 Key points
9.9 Conclusion

10 EXPERIENCES OF PRE-SCHOOL EDUCATION
10.1 Introduction
10.1.1 Types of analysis
10.2 Overview of pre-school attendance
10.2.1 Type of pre-school place attended
10.2.2 Age at starting pre-school
10.3 Reasons for enrolling in pre-school
10.4 Advice and support needs
10.4.1 Advice before enrolling
10.4.2 Support with starting pre-school
10.5 Feelings about pre-school in the first 2 months
10.6 Parental perceptions of children's 'readiness' for pre-school
10.6.1 Partners views on children's 'readiness' for pre-school
10.7 Key points
10.8 Conclusion

11 REFERENCES

12 APPENDIX A: TECHNICAL NOTES
12.1 Sampling
12.1.1 Sample design
12.1.2 Families who moved between sweeps
12.2 Response rates
12.3 Data collection
12.3.1 Mode of data collection
12.3.2 Length of interview
12.3.3 Timing of fieldwork
12.4 Analysis
12.4.1 Weighting
12.4.2 Estimating the precision of estimates
12.4.3 Presentation of results
12.4.4 National Statistics Socio-Economic Classification ( NS-SEC)
12.4.5 Scottish Government Urban Rural Classification
12.4.6 Scottish Index of Multiple Deprivation

The views expressed in this report are those of the researcher and
do not necessarily represent those of the Department or Scottish Ministers.

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