We are testing a new beta website for gov.scot go to new site

High Level Summary of Equality Statistics: Key Trends for Scotland 2006

Listen

4. Transport and Travel

Introduction to Transport and Travel and Equality

This section of the High Level Summary of Equality Statistics ( HLSES) presents key information on transport and travel in Scotland across a number of equality dimensions including age, disability, gender and, in a small number of cases, ethnicity and religion. It reflects key areas of activity identified in the main High Level Summary of Statistics ( HLSS) chapter on transport and travel ( http://www.scotland.gov.uk/Topics/Statistics) from an equalities perspective and includes a few additional topics where these are particularly relevant to equality issues. Where the main HLSS publication presents data by any of these equality dimensions, these are also shown here for ease of reference.

As well as showing key high level trends, these analyses highlight where differences and potential areas of inequality may exist for transport and travel in Scotland for those groups outlined above. These analyses are not intended to provide a definitive set of equalities data and more detailed statistics for some of the equality dimensions, where available, may be found using the links provided. It is also not possible to breakdown all topics by all equality dimensions.

There are limitations in how far some data can be broken down by the above equality dimensions. Data taken from sample surveys often contain small numbers, particularly in the case of smaller ethnic groups and to some extent disability. As such, some data are prone to sampling error and trends based on such data often show a high degree of volatility. In such instances, data may have been combined for multiple years or multiple ethnic groups, whilst in other cases data may be shown for a single year only. In other instances small data may have been suppressed in order to protect individuals' confidentiality.

Possible reasons underlying any differences reported in this chapter are not discussed here. Factors which contribute to differences between equality groups represent a complex interplay of cultural, demographic and socio-economic factors and, as such are outwith the scope of this publication. However some links to relevant research are provided, where available.

Personal Travel

Average Distance Travelled

Average Distance Travelled: Gender

On average, Scots travelled 7,332 miles per person (all ages) per year in Great Britain in the two year period 2004-2005 (combined), according to the National Travel Survey ( NTS). The car (or van/ lorry) was used as the main mode of transport for over three-quarters of the distance travelled (5,621 miles). For adults (people aged 16 and over) the average was 7,972 miles per head per year. On average, men travelled 9,175 miles compared to 6,866 miles for women (a difference of 2,309 miles). A car, van or lorry was the main mode of transport for both men (79% of distance travelled) and women (74% of all distance travelled).

image of Average Distance (Miles) Scots Travelled in Great Britain, per Head, per Year, by Gender, 2004 & 2005 Combined

Source: National Travel Survey ( NTS) - 2004 & 2005
Note: 1. Sample data have been combined for 2004 and 2005 in order to boost sample size and reduce the effect of sampling error.

Publications

Social Focus on Women and Men 2002 http://www.scotland.gov.uk/stats/sfwm/docs/sfwm-00.asp

Travel by Scottish residents: some NTS results (Published 2005) http://www.scotland.gov.uk/Publications/2005/04/1894658/46593

Scottish Transport Statistics (Published 2005) www.scotland.gov.uk/transtat/sts

Updated Versions of Scottish Transport Statistics Tables www.scotland.gov.uk/transtat/stsupdate

Average Distance Travelled: Age

According to the National Travel Survey ( NTS), adults aged between 30 and 59 years, travelled a greater average distance in Great Britain per person, per year (9,382 miles) in 2004-2005 combined, than adults aged between 16 and 29 years or aged 60 years and over. Adults aged between 30 and 59 years used a car (or van/ lorry) for 80% of the annual distance travelled. This proportion of car usage is the highest of all age groups.

image of Average Distance (Miles) Scots Travelled in Great Britain, per Head, per Year, By Age Group, 2004 & 2005 Combined

Source: National Travel Survey ( NTS) - 2003 & 2004
Note: 1. Sample data have been combined for 2004 and 2005 in order to boost sample size and reduce the effect of sampling error.

Publications

Travel by Scottish residents: some NTS results (Published 2005) http://www.scotland.gov.uk/Publications/2005/04/1894658/46593

Scottish Transport Statistics (Published 2005) www.scotland.gov.uk/transtat/sts

Travel to Work

Mode of Transport to Work

Mode of Transport to Work: Gender

According to the Scottish Household Survey in 2005, the car/van is the most popular mode of commuting to work for both males (71%) and females (65%), as either a driver or a passenger. Since 1999, larger proportions of both males and females drive to work, and smaller proportions travel as a car passenger.

In 2005, 10% of men who commuted walked to work, as did 15% of women. The bus was the next most popular mode of transport for commuting to work for both males (9%) and females (14%) in 2005. The bicycle and 'Other Modes' of transport are the least popular ways to commute to work for both males (3% for both modes) and females (1% for both modes).

image of Usual Mode of Travel to Work, Employed Adults Aged 16 Years & Over, by Gender, Scotland, 1999 & 2005

Source: Scottish Household Survey -1999 & 2005
Notes: 1. Excluding those people who worked at or from home.
2. Those whose current situation is described as 'self-employed', 'employed full-time' or 'employed part-time'.
3. Rail includes Glasgow Underground.
4. Other Modes include forms of transport such as lorry, motorcycle, taxi etc.

Publications

Social Focus on Women and Men 2002 http://www.scotland.gov.uk/stats/sfwm/docs/sfwm-00.asp

Household Transport in 2005: some Scottish Household Survey results (Published 2006) http://www.scotland.gov.uk/Topics/Statistics/Browse/Transport-Travel/PubHouseTran

Scottish Transport Statistics (Published 2005) www.scotland.gov.uk/transtat/sts

Updated Versions of Scottish Transport Statistics Tables www.scotland.gov.uk/transtat/stsupdate

Web Link

Scottish Household Survey http://www.scotland.gov.uk/Topics/Statistics/16002/4031

Mode of Transport to Work: Disability

According to the 2005 Scottish Household Survey, there is relatively little difference in the modes of transport by which people with and without a disability/ long-term illness commute to work. The most popular mode of transport for both groups is the car/ van, either as driver or passenger (67% of adults with a disability/ long-term illness and 68% of adults with no disability/ long-term illness). Since 1999, higher proportions of both groups are commuting to work as a car driver, and fewer travel as a car passenger.

The bicycle is the least popular mode of transport for commuting to work for adults with a disability/ long-term illness (1%), whilst the bicycle and other modes of transport are the least popular mode of transport for adults with no disability/ long-term illness (2% for both modes).

image of aUsual Mode of Travel to Work, Employed Adults Aged 16 Years & Over, by Disability Status, Scotland, 1999 & 2005

Source: Scottish Household Survey -1999 & 2005
Notes: 1. Excluding those people who worked at or from home.
2. Those whose current situation is described as 'self-employed', 'employed full-time' or 'employed part-time'.
3. Disability status is self-assessed by the respondent.
4. Rail includes Glasgow Underground.
5. Other Modes include forms of transport such as lorry, motorcycle, taxi etc.

Publication

Social Focus on Disability 2004 http://www.scotland.gov.uk/Publications/2004/08/19818/41697

Web Link

Scottish Household Survey http://www.scotland.gov.uk/Topics/Statistics/16002/4031

Mode of Transport to Work: Age

According to the Scottish Household Survey in 2005, the car/van (either as a passenger or driver) is the most popular form of transport used to commute to work for all age groups. In general, the use of a car to commute to work increases with age (with the exception of those aged between 50 and 59 years). Conversely, the use of the bus to commute to work tends to decline with age (with the exception of those aged 60 years and over). Adults aged between 16 and 19 years are most likely to commute to work by car/ van (36% either as a driver or passenger), followed by the bus (28%) and then walking (25%).

In general the modes of transport which different age groups use to commute to work have not changed dramatically since 1999. However there are a few differences. In 2005, of 30-39 year olds who travelled to work, 65% drove compared to only 59% in 1999; the corresponding increase for 40-49 year olds was from 57% in 1999 to 65% in 2005 and for 50-59 year olds from 55% to 63%.

Thirteen per cent of adults aged 20 to 29 years commuted to work by bus in 1999 and this increased to 20% in 2005.

image of Usual Mode of Travel to Work, Employed Adults Aged 16 Years & Over, by Age Group, Scotland, 2005

image of Usual Mode of Travel to Work, Employed Adults Aged 16 & Over, by Age Group, Scotland, 1999

Source: Scottish Household Survey -1999 & 2005
Notes: 1. Excluding those people who worked at or from home.
2. Those whose current situation is described as 'self-employed', 'employed full-time' or 'employed part-time'.
3. Rail includes Glasgow Underground.
4. Other Modes include forms of transport such as lorry, motorcycle, taxi etc.

Publications

Household Transport in 2005: some Scottish Household Survey results (Published 2006) http://www.scotland.gov.uk/Topics/Statistics/Browse/Transport-Travel/PubHouseTran

Scottish Transport Statistics (Published 2005) www.scotland.gov.uk/transtat/sts

Updated Versions of Scottish Transport Statistics Tables www.scotland.gov.uk/transtat/stsupdate

Web Link

Scottish Household Survey http://www.scotland.gov.uk/Topics/Statistics/16002/4031

Travel to School

Travel to School: Age (Children)

In 2005, 53% of pupils walked to school, 24% went by bus and 21% by car, according to the Scottish Household Survey ( SHS). One per cent cycled, 1% went by train and 2% used other modes of transport.

Pupils aged 4 to 11 years (broadly, primary school ages) were more likely to walk (59% against 45% for 12 to 18 year olds) or go by car (26% against 14%). Pupils aged 12 to 18 years were more likely to go by bus (38% against 13%). The chart shows how the use of the different modes changes with age (the apparent year-to-year fluctuations may reflect sampling variability).

Roughly half of the pupils living in rural areas went by bus, and under a third walked. Fifty-six per cent of pupils in large urban areas walked to school, and only 20% went by bus. The percentage travelling by car did not vary much with the type of area.

Since the SHS started in 1999, the percentage of pupils travelling by car seems to have risen, the percentage who walk may have fallen and there has been little change in the use of the bus. Sampling variability may cause some apparent year-to-year fluctuations. Over the longer term, the National Travel Survey ( NTS) shows that the percentage walking to school has fallen (it was around 69% in 1985-86), that those who travel by car has risen (from about 6% in 1985-86), and that there has been little change in the use of the bus.

image of Travel to School, By Age of Pupil, Scotland, 2005

Source: More detailed version of figures from an updated version of this table available in Scottish Transport Statistics 2005 edition (Table 12.18) and Household Transport in 2005 (Table 27)

Publications

Household Transport in 2005: some Scottish Household Survey results (Published 2006) http://www.scotland.gov.uk/Topics/Statistics/Browse/Transport-Travel/PubHouseTran

Scottish Transport Statistics (Published 2005) www.scotland.gov.uk/transtat/sts

Updated Versions of Scottish Transport Statistics Tables www.scotland.gov.uk/transtat/stsupdate

Web Link

Scottish Household Survey http://www.scotland.gov.uk/Topics/Statistics/16002/4031

Private Transport

Driving Licence Possession

Driving Licence Possession: Disability

In 2005, the Scottish Household Survey estimates that 44% of people aged 17 and over who have a disability or long-term illness hold a full driving licence. This compares to 72% of people who report no disability/ long-term illness.

Since 1999 the proportion of people aged 17 and over who hold a full driving licence and have no disability or long-term illness has increased steadily year on year, whilst for those with a disability or long-term illness the proportion fell to a low of 41% in 2001 and has since increased steadily to around 45%.

image of People (Aged 17 Years & Over) With a Full Driving Licence, by Disability Status, Scotland, 1999 to 2005

Source: Scottish Household Survey - 1999 to 2005

Publications

Social Focus on Disability 2004 http://www.scotland.gov.uk/Publications/2004/08/19818/41697

Reid-Howie Associates (2004) Transport Provision for Disabled People: Progress since 1998 http://www.scotland.gov.uk/Publications/2004/07/19591/39825

Web Link

Scottish Household Survey http://www.scotland.gov.uk/Topics/Statistics/16002/4031

Driving Licence Possession: Ethnic Group

According to the combined results of the Scottish Household Survey between 2001 and 2005, adults from minority ethnic groups are markedly less likely to hold a driving licence (48%) than white ethnic groups (66%). However it should be noted that the number of respondents from minority ethnic groups on which the first proportion is based is fairly small (531) (even when five years' data are combined) and as such could be subject to a degree of sampling error.

Adults (17 Years & Over) - Driving Licence Possession by Combined Ethnic Group 1, Scotland, 2003-2005 (Combined) 2

Percentage & Number

Ethnic Group (Combined)

Scotland

2003-2005 (Combined)

Driving Licence Possession
17 Years & Over

YES

NO

Base

White Ethnic Groups

66

34

38,281

Minority Ethnic Groups 3

48

52

531

All People 4

65

35

38,826

Source: Scottish Household Survey - April 2003 to December 2005
Notes: 1. Survey data have been combined for the period April 2003 to December 2005, due to small sample sizes for minority ethnic groups in each given year.
2. Ethnic groups have been combined due to small sample sizes.
3. The percentage shown for minority ethnic groups, is based on a small sample size or just over 500 respondents and as such could be subject to a degree of sampling error.
4. Includes counts of ethnic group unknown or not disclosed, therefore numbers do not sum to total.
5. The SHS does not provide ethnic group information for 2001, 2002 or the first three months of 2003 because of problems with the way the data for that period were collected and coded.

Publication

Analysis of Ethnicity in the 2001 Census - Summary Report http://www.scotland.gov.uk/Publications/2004/02/18876/32937

Web Link

Scottish Household Survey http://www.scotland.gov.uk/Topics/Statistics/16002/4031

Driving Licence Possession: Religion Group & Age

Combining data from 2001 to 2005, the Scottish Household Survey shows that adults aged 17 years and over who classify themselves as belonging to an Other Christian religion group are most likely to possess a driving licence (72%). This compares to 55% of adults classifying themselves as Roman Catholic. However for most religion groups there are no marked differences in the proportion of adults who hold a driving licence.

Across all religion groups and those with no religion, it can be seen that the proportion of people with a full driving licence increases markedly between the ages of 17 to 29 years and 30 to 39 years. After the age of 40 to 49 years, the proportion of those with a full driving licence starts to decline for the remaining age groups.

image of People (Aged 17 Years & Over) With a Full Driving Licence, by Religion Group, Scotland, 2001 to 2005 Combined

Source: Scottish Household Survey - 2001 to 2005
Notes: 1. Survey data have been combined for each year from 2001 to 2005, due to small sample sizes for certain religion groups in each given year.
2. Includes Buddhist, Hindu, Muslim, Jewish, Sikh and "Another religion". Sample sizes for these religion groups are too small to break down further.

Publication

Analysis of Religion in the 2001 Census http://www.scotland.gov.uk/Publications/2005/02/20757/53567

Web Link

Scottish Household Survey http://www.scotland.gov.uk/Topics/Statistics/16002/4031

Frequency of Driving

Frequency of Driving: Age & Gender

In 2005, almost two-thirds (65%) of people aged 17 years and over had a full driving licence: 77% of men but only 56% of women, according to the Scottish Household Survey ( SHS). The percentage was highest (around 78% to 79%) for those aged 30 to 49 years. It was higher for men than for women for every age-group, as shown in the chart. Possession of a full driving licence increased with income, from 44% of people aged 17 years and over living in households with a net income of up to £10,000 per year, to 92% of those in "over £40,000" households. In rural areas, around four-fifths of people aged 17 years and over had a full driving licence, compared with under three-fifths in large urban areas.

The Scottish Household Survey shows that, since 1999, the percentage of 17 years and over with a full driving licence has risen from 63%, with little change in the figure for men and an increase from 52% for women. The small Scottish part of the ( GB) National Travel Survey ( NTS) sample shows longer-term growth (from 49% in 1985-1986 to 67% in 2004-2005), due mainly to a large increase for women (from 34% to 58%), with the figure for men rising less rapidly (from 68% to 78%). It should be noted that SHS and NTS results differ slightly (e.g.) due to sampling variability.

In 2005, 41% of people aged 17 years and over said that they drove every day: 50% of men and 34% of women. The percentage was highest (around 55%) for those aged 30 to 49 years. It was higher for men than for women for every age group. The percentage of people aged 17 years and over who drove every day increased with annual net household income, from 19% of those living in households with a net income of up to £10,000 per year, to 70% in "over £40,000" households. In rural areas, around half the people aged 17 years and over drove every day, compared with about a third in large urban areas.

image of People (Aged 17 Years & Over) with a Full Driving Licence, and Who Drive Every Day, Scotland, 2005

Source: More detailed version of figures appearing in an updated version of Scottish Transport Statistics 2005 edition (Tables 1.16 and 12.10) and Household Transport in 2005 (Tables 2 and 3)

Publications

Social Focus on Women and Men 2002 http://www.scotland.gov.uk/stats/sfwm/docs/sfwm-00.asp

Household Transport in 2005: some SHS results (Published 2006) http://www.scotland.gov.uk/Topics/Statistics/Browse/Transport-Travel/PubHouseTran

Scottish Transport Statistics (Published 2005) www.scotland.gov.uk/transtat/sts

Updated Versions of Scottish Transport Statistics Tables www.scotland.gov.uk/transtat/stsupdate

Travel by Scottish residents: some NTS results (Published 2005) http://www.scotland.gov.uk/Publications/2005/04/1894658/46593

Web Link

Scottish Household Survey http://www.scotland.gov.uk/Topics/Statistics/16002/4031

Frequency of Driving: Disability

According to the Scottish Household Survey in 2005, 50% of adults aged 17 years and over who report a disability or long-term illness (and who possess a full driving licence) drive every day. This compares to 66% of those who report no disability/ long-term illness. Though data are quite volatile year on year, in general, the proportion of adults who drive every day has tended to decrease for both groups between 1999 and 2005.

In 2005, 14% of adults with a disability/ long-term illness possess a full driving licence but never drive. This compares to 5% of those with no disability/ long-term illness. There has been relatively little change in these proportions since 1999.

image of People (Aged 17 Years & Over) With a Full Driving Licence; Frequency of Driving by Disability Status, Scotland, 1999 to 2005

Source: Scottish Household Survey -1999 to 2005
Note: 1. Disability status is self-assessed by the respondent.

Publications

Social Focus on Disability 2004 http://www.scotland.gov.uk/Publications/2004/08/19818/41697

Reid-Howie Associates (2004) Transport Provision for Disabled People: Progress since 1998 http://www.scotland.gov.uk/Publications/2004/07/19591/39825

Web Link

Scottish Household Survey http://www.scotland.gov.uk/Topics/Statistics/16002/4031

Frequency of Driving: Ethnic Group

Combining data from 2003 to 2005, the Scottish Household Survey estimates that 26% of adults (aged 17 years and above) from minority ethnic groups drive every day, compared to 41% of adults from white ethnic groups. Also of note is that over half (52%) of adults from minority ethnic groups do not have a full driving licence, compared to 34% of adults from white ethnic groups.

image of Frequency of Driving in Adults Aged 17 Years & Over, by Combined Ethnic Group, Scotland, 2003 to 2005 (Combined)

Source: Scottish Household Survey - April 2003 to December 2005
Notes: 1. Ethnic groups have been combined due to small sample sizes.
2. The percentage shown for minority ethnic groups is based on a small sample size or just over 500 respondents and as such could be subject to a degree of sampling error.
3. Survey data have been combined for 2003 to 2005, due to small sample sizes for minority ethnic groups in each given year.
4. The SHS does not provide ethnic group information for 2001, 2002 or the first three months of 2003 because of problems with the way in which the data for that period were collected and coded.

Publication

Analysis of Ethnicity in the 2001 Census - Summary Report http://www.scotland.gov.uk/Publications/2004/02/18876/32937

Web Link

Scottish Household Survey http://www.scotland.gov.uk/Topics/Statistics/16002/4031

Walking and Cycling

Walking and Cycling: Age & Gender

The Scottish Household Survey asks adults whether, in the previous seven days, they walked more than a quarter of a mile in order to go somewhere (e.g. to work, to the shops, or to visit friends). In 2005, 53% of adults had done so. The percentages for men and women were about the same. Adults aged 16 to 19 years were the most likely to have walked to go somewhere, with over two-thirds reporting this, compared with only about half of those in their 50s and 60s, and one third of those aged 80 years and over. The percentage did not vary much with household income.

The interviewer asks a similar question about walking for pleasure or to keep fit (including jogging and walking a dog). Forty-six per cent of adults said that they had done so (48% of men and 45% of women). The chart shows how the percentage varies with sex and age. Walking for pleasure or to keep fit tended to rise with household income.

Similar information is collected about cycling. Three per cent of adults had made a trip of more than a quarter of a mile by bicycle, in the previous seven days, in order to go somewhere. The percentage was slightly higher for men and for younger adults. Four per cent had cycled for pleasure or to keep fit. The chart shows how this varies with sex and age; it also tended to rise with household income.

image of Walking and Cycling for Pleasure or to Keep Fit (on One or More of the Previous Seven Days), Scotland, 2005

Source: More detailed version of figures in an updated version of Scottish Transport Statistics 2005 edition (Tables 12.11 and 12.12) and Household Transport in 2005 (Tables 12 and 13)

Publications

Social Focus on Women and Men 2002 http://www.scotland.gov.uk/stats/sfwm/docs/sfwm-00.asp

Household Transport in 2005: some SHS results (Published 2006) http://www.scotland.gov.uk/Topics/Statistics/Browse/Transport-Travel/PubHouseTran

Scottish Transport Statistics (Published 2005) www.scotland.gov.uk/transtat/sts

updated versions of Scottish Transport Statistics tables www.scotland.gov.uk/transtat/stsupdate

Web Link

Scottish Household Survey http://www.scotland.gov.uk/Topics/Statistics/16002/4031

Public Transport

Availability of Bus Services

Availability of Bus Services: Age

According to the Scottish Household Survey 2005, there is little difference in walking time to the nearest bus stop for households containing one or more people of pensionable age and all households.

Forty-seven per cent of respondents from households containing one or more people of pensionable age reported that walking time 1 to the nearest bus stop took under 3 minutes. Only 1% reported that it took 44 minutes or more and only 1% reported that there was no bus service.

image of Walking Time to Nearest Bus Stop (For SHS Inerviewer), Households Where One Person Is a Pensioner & All Households, Scotland, 2005

Source: Scottish Household Survey - 2005
Note: 1. This SHS question is phrased as "About how long would it take me (the SHS interviewer) to walk from here (the respondent's house) to the nearest bus stop?", therefore responses should not be affected by different levels of mobility experienced by respondents.

Publications

Bus and Coach Statistics 2004-05 (Published 2006) www.scotland.gov.uk/transtat/latest

Scottish Transport Statistics (Published 2005) www.scotland.gov.uk/transtat/sts

Updated Versions of Scottish Transport Statistics Tables www.scotland.gov.uk/transtat/stsupdate

Web Link

Scottish Household Survey http://www.scotland.gov.uk/Topics/Statistics/16002/4031

Availability of Bus Services: Disability

According to the Scottish Household Survey 2005, there is virtually no difference in walking time to the nearest bus stop for households containing one or more people with a disability or long-term illness, households containing no people with a disability or long-term illness and all households.

In 2005, 52% of respondents in households containing one or more people with a disability or long-term illness, reported that walking time 1 to the nearest bus stop was under 3 minutes, 0% reported that it took 44 minutes or more and 1% reported that there was no bus service.

image of Walking time to Nearest Bus Stop (For SHS Interviewer), by Disability Status of Household, Scotland, 2005

Source: Scottish Household Survey, 2005
Notes: 1. This SHS question is phrased as "About how long would it take me (the SHS interviewer) to walk from here (the respondent's house) to the nearest bus stop. Therefore responses should not be affected by different levels of mobility experienced by respondents.

Publications

Social Focus on Disability 2004 http://www.scotland.gov.uk/Publications/2004/08/19818/41697

Reid-Howie Associates (2004) Transport Provision for Disabled People: Progress since 1998 http://www.scotland.gov.uk/Publications/2004/07/19591/39825

Web Link

Scottish Household Survey http://www.scotland.gov.uk/Topics/Statistics/16002/4031

Local Bus Services

Local Bus Services: Disability

Adults with a disability or long-term illness are more likely to use a local bus service than those with no disability or long-term illness.

The Scottish Household Survey 2005 estimates that adults with a disability or long-term illness are most likely to use a bus service 2 or 3 times a week (15%) or every day/almost every day (13%). Those with no disability or long-term illness are also most likely to use a bus service 2 or 3 times a week (11%) or every day/ almost every day (11%).

Fifty-six per cent of adults with a disability or long-term illness have used a bus service in the previous month (to the survey interview). This compares to 42% of adults reporting no disability or long-term illness. Since 2002, the most marked difference in frequency of local bus use is that the proportion of adults with a disability or long-term illness using the bus every day or almost every day has increased from 9% to 13%.

image of Frequency of Using a Local Bus Service in the Past Month, People with a Disability/ Long-Term Illness (D) & People with No Disability/ Long-Term Illness (ND)Scotland, 2005

Source: Scottish Household Survey

Publications

Social Focus on Disability 2004 http://www.scotland.gov.uk/Publications/2004/08/19818/41697

Reid-Howie Associates (2004) Transport Provision for Disabled People: Progress since 1998 http://www.scotland.gov.uk/Publications/2004/07/19591/39825

Web Link

Scottish Household Survey http://www.scotland.gov.uk/Topics/Statistics/16002/4031

Local Bus Services: Gender

Women make more use of local bus services than men.

The Scottish Household Survey 2005 estimates that women are most likely to use a bus service 2 or 3 times a week (14%) or every day/almost every day (13%). Men are also most likely to use a bus service 2 or 3 times a week (10%) or every day/ almost every day (10%).

Thirty-six per cent of men have used a bus service in the previous month (to the survey interview) compared to 48% of women.

Since 2002 there has been virtually no change in the use of local bus services by men and women.

image of Frequency of Using Local Bus Service in the Past Month, Men (M) and Women (W), Scotland, 2005

Source: Scottish Household Survey

Publications

Social Focus on Women and Men 2002 http://www.scotland.gov.uk/stats/sfwm/docs/sfwm-00.asp

Household Transport in 2005 - some Scottish Household Survey results (published 2006) http://www.scotland.gov.uk/Topics/Statistics/Browse/Transport-Travel/PubHouseTran

Bus and Coach Statistics 2004-05 (Published 2006) www.scotland.gov.uk/transtat/latest

Web Link

Scottish Household Survey http://www.scotland.gov.uk/Topics/Statistics/16002/4031

Local Bus Services: Age

Pensioners are more likely to use local bus services than other adults.

The Scottish Household Survey in 2005 estimates that pensioners are most likely to use a bus service 2 to 3 times a week (20%), whereas adults as a whole are most likely to use a bus service 2 to 3 times a week (12%) or every day/ almost every day (12%).

Fifty-one per cent of pensioners have used a bus service in the previous month (to the survey interview) compared to 46% of adults as a whole.

Since 2002, the most marked difference in local bus use is that proportion of pensioners using a local bus service in the previous month (to survey) has increased from 46% to 51%.

image of Frequency of Using a Local Bus Service in the Past Month, Pensioners (P) and All Adults (AA), Scotland, 2005

Source: Scottish Household Survey

Publications

Household Transport in 2005: some Scottish Household Survey results (Published 2006) http://www.scotland.gov.uk/Topics/Statistics/Browse/Transport-Travel/PubHouseTran

Bus and Coach Statistics 2004-05 (Published 2006) www.scotland.gov.uk/transtat/latest

Web Link

Scottish Household Survey http://www.scotland.gov.uk/Topics/Statistics/16002/4031

Rail Passenger Services

Rail Passenger Services: Disability

Adults with a disability or long-term illness are less likely to use the train service than adults with no disability or long-term illness.

The Scottish Household Survey in 2005 estimates that adults with a disability or long-term illness are most likely to use a train service about once a month (5%), as are those with no disability/ long-term illness (10%).

Eight per cent of adults with a disability or long-term illness have used a train service in the previous month (to the survey interview). This compares to 22% of adults with no disability or long-term illness. Compared to 2002, there is relatively little difference in the use of train services for adults with a disability or long-term illness and those with no disability or long-term illness.

image of Frequency of Using a Train Service in the Past 6 Months, Adults with a Disability/ Long-Term Illness & Adults with No Disability/ Long-Term Illness, Scotland, 2005

Source: Scottish Household Survey

Publications

Social Focus on Disability 2004 http://www.scotland.gov.uk/Publications/2004/08/19818/41697

Reid-Howie Associates (2004) Transport Provision for Disabled People: Progress since 1998 http://www.scotland.gov.uk/Publications/2004/07/19591/39825

Web Link

Scottish Household Survey http://www.scotland.gov.uk/Topics/Statistics/16002/4031

Rail Passenger Services: Gender

There is very little difference in train usage for men and women.

The Scottish Household Survey in 2005 estimates that both adult men and women are most likely to use a train service about once a month (9% for both groups).

Twenty per cent of adult men had used a train service in the previous month (to the survey interview) and this compares similarly to 19% of adult men.

Since 2002, the most marked difference in use of the train service is that the proportion of adult men who used a train service in the previous month increased from 14% to 20%.

image of Frequency of Using a Train Service in the Past 6 Months, Men (M) & Women (W), Scotland, 2005

Source: Scottish Household Survey

Publications

Social Focus on Women and Men 2002 http://www.scotland.gov.uk/stats/sfwm/docs/sfwm-00.asp

Household Transport in 2005: some Scottish Household Survey results (Published 2006) http://www.scotland.gov.uk/Topics/Statistics/Browse/Transport-Travel/PubHouseTran

Web Link

Scottish Household Survey http://www.scotland.gov.uk/Topics/Statistics/16002/4031

Rail Passenger Services: Age

Pensioners are less likely to use train services than adults as a whole.

The Scottish Household Survey in 2005 estimates that both pensioners and all adults are most likely to use the train about once a fortnight (6% of pensioners and 9% of all adults).

Eleven per cent of pensioners have used a train service in the previous month (to the survey interview). This compares to 19% of adults as a whole.

Since 2002, the most marked differences in use of the train service are that the proportion of those who used a train service about once a fortnight has increased from 3% to 9% for adults as a whole and the proportion who used a train service about once a month decreased from 5% to 0% for pensioners and from 7% to 2% for adults as a whole.

image of Frequency of Using Train Service in the Past Month, Pensioners (P) and All Adults (AA), Scotland, 2005

Source: Scottish Household Survey

Publication

Transport in 2005: some Scottish Household Survey results (Published 2006) http://www.scotland.gov.uk/Topics/Statistics/Browse/Transport-Travel/PubHouseTran

Web Link

Scottish Household Survey http://www.scotland.gov.uk/Topics/Statistics/16002/4031

Road Accident Casualties

Road Accident Casualties: Age

In 2004, the rate of road accident casualties was markedly higher for people aged between 16 to 24 years (728 per 100,000 population). This was followed by people aged 25 to 59 years (389 per 100,000 population) and 0 to 15 years (254 per 100,000 population), with those aged 60 years and over having the lowest rate (208 per 100,000 population).

Since 1999 casualty rates have been steadily declining across all age groups, with the exception of those aged 60 and above, for whom rates have remained fairly static. The largest decrease was for people aged 16 to 24 years for whom casualty rates fell from 864 per 100,000 population in 1999 to 728 per 100,000 population in 2004.

image of Road Accident Casualty Rate, By Age, Scotland, 1999 to 2004

Source: Road Accident Data: Road Accidents Scotland
Mid Year Population Estimates: General Register Office for Scotland

Publication

Road Accidents Scotland http://www.scotland.gov.uk/Topics/Statistics/Browse/Transport-Travel/PubRoadAcc