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Environment Group Research Report 2005/04 - Continuing the Dialogue on Radioactive Waste Management: Engaging Young Scotland Innovatively

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Annex 2. Other Deliverables

The readers of this Final Report (the fifth from the study) are also pointed to the 4 earlier interim reports or 'deliverables' D1 to D4 that form part of this study. These are reports that consider in more depth a number of the topics reported on here. Each is described below.

D1: Literature and Practice Review Report

The report assesses the main themes and issues that emerged from phase one by: -

  • Identifying up-to-date best practice in electronic participation via a literature and practice review that applies frameworks developed by the authors for characterising electronic participation initiatives.
  • Identifying up-to-date best practice on engaging young people in Scotland and elsewhere via a literature and practice review focusing on differences between Scotland and the rest of the UK.

D2: Tools & Materials Overview Report

The report provides a description of the tools and materials developed in phase two of the project, to be used as basis for the work of the focus groups in phase three.

D3: Focus Group Materials and Details

This describes the written and electronic materials that were 'tested' to work best with young people in informing and engaging in the debate. It provides details of: -

  • the three focus groups held with young people across Scotland, including venues, dates and participants, and the comments they provided
  • the support materials given to focus group participants. This includes introductory information sheets, appropriate tool lists and scenarios and consent forms.

D4: Specification of an electronic tools package

This provides a draft specification for an electronic tools package for engagement, intended for use by ERAD and SE together with associated engagement plans to support the CoWRM work programme and future consultations.

Copies of the above reports are available on request from:

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Small changes in the way we perform everyday tasks can have huge impacts on Scotland's environment.

Walking short distances rather than using the car, or being careful not to overfill the kettle are just two positive steps we can all take.

This butterfly represents the beauty and fragility of Scotland's environment. The motif will be utilised extensively by the Scottish Executive and its partners in their efforts to persuade people they can do a little to change a lot.