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Statistical Bulletin Edn/B1/2005/1: Pupils in Scotland, 2004

DescriptionStatistical bulletin containing information on pupils in publicly funded schools in Scotland mainly derived from the latest annual pupil census which took place in September 2004.
ISBN0 7559 3986
Official Print Publication Date
Website Publication DateApril 12, 2005

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Statistical Bulletin Edn/B1/2005/1: Pupils in Scotland, 2004

12 April, 2005

ISBN 0 7559 3986 7
ISSN 0 143 599X

This document is also available in pdf format (544k)
The tables are also available in Excel format (360k)

1. Introduction

1.1 This document contains information on pupils in publicly funded schools in Scotland, mainly derived from the latest annual pupil census which took place in September 2004. The collection of this data at pupil level means that there are more ways in which information on pupils in Scotland's schools can be analysed. As well as the tables contained in this document, the pupil characteristics collected in the census can also be matched against attainment, attendance and exclusions information, and can further be analysed at smaller geographic areas.

1.2 Tables in this publication are grouped into chapters, firstly at a national level into all sector summary figures ( tables 1.1-1.10), then into primary ( tables 2.1-2.20), secondary ( tables 3.1-3.11) and special ( tables 4.1-4.8). Then local authority figures are similarly grouped ( tables 5.1-5.4, 6.1-6.12, 7.1-7.11, 8.1-8.10). Next there are four tables of data on school boards ( tables 9.1-9.4) and then four tables of data on information and communication technology ( tables 10.1-10.4). At the bottom of each table a note will direct you to the equivalent national or local authority table. A map of local authorities is given on page 81, and an index is also provided at the back of the publication.

2. Main Statistics

2.1 In September 2004 there were a total of 723,554 pupils in 2,793 publicly funded schools in Scotland.

2.2 There were 398,100 pupils in 2,217 primary schools, 318,065 pupils in 386 secondary schools, and 7,389 pupils in 190 special schools ( table 1.1). Pupil numbers have been reducing, in line with a fall in the population. In recent years the proportion of pupils in special schools has been falling slightly, from 1.11 per cent in 2000 to 1.02 per cent in 2004.

2.3 There were 32,772 pupils who were either based in a special schools or had a RoN and/or IEP in primary or secondary schools ( table 1.3). In mainstream schools there were 25,383 pupils (3.5 per cent of all mainstream pupils) with a Record of Needs ( RoN) and/or an Individualised Educational Programme ( IEP). This compares to 23,266 in 2003, a nine per cent increase. Eighty-three per cent of these pupils spent all of their time in mainstream classes, this compares with eighty-one per cent in 2003.

2.4 Of those with a RoN and/or IEP in mainstream and special schools, the largest categories of main difficulty were moderate learning difficulties (10.2 pupils per 1,000), specific learning difficulties in language and/or mathematics - including dyslexia (9.5 pupils per 1,000) and social emotional and behavioural difficulties (5.7 pupils per 1,000). Overall 70 per cent of pupils with a RoN and/or IEP were boys, the same proportion as in 2003. ( table 1.4)

2.5 Of those pupils whose ethnic background was declared, 95 per cent were white- UK. The largest other groupings were White-other (1.2 per cent), Asian-Pakistani (1.2 per cent), and Mixed (0.7 per cent). 3.7 per cent of pupils did not disclose their ethnic background ( table 1.6), this compares with 4.3 per cent in 2003.

2.6 About a third of primary schools had fewer than 100 pupils, with the average size being 180 pupils. The average number of pupils in a secondary school was 824, with almost a third having over 1,000 pupils ( table 1.10)

2.7 The average class size in primary schools was 23.9 pupils, up from 23.7 in 2003. Composite classes had an average of 20.2 pupils, up from 20.1 in 2003. P1 classes had the smallest average size of single stage classes at 23.2 pupils, the same as in 2003 ( table 2.11).

2.8 About 76 per cent of S3 pupils stayed on until S5, with the figure dropping to 67 per cent post-Christmas when education becomes voluntary for all S5 pupils. The staying on rate until S6 was 44 per cent ( table 3.11).

2.9 Of those schools eligible, 89 per cent had a school board in May 2004, compared to 84 per cent in May 2002 ( table 9.4). 88 per cent of primary schools had a school board (a 5 per cent increase from May 2002), 97 per cent of secondary schools (a 1 per cent increase from May 2002) and 78 per cent of special schools (a 22 per cent increase from May 2002).

2.10 There were nine pupils to each modern computer in primary schools and five in secondary schools; 79 per cent of pupils had e-mail addresses, 98 per cent of schools had e-mail addresses and 99.6 per cent of schools had access to the internet ( tables 10.1-10.4).

Tables

Scotland

All Sectors
1.1 Schools and pupils, by school sector, 1996-2004
1.2 Pupils by urban/rural and registration for free school meals, 2004
1.3 Integration of pupils with a Record of Needs and/or an Individualised Educational Programme into mainstream classes, 2004
1.4 Main difficulty in learning of pupils with a Record of Needs and/or an Individualised Educational Programme in primary, secondary and special schools, by gender, 2004
1.5 Pupils looked after by local authority, 2004
1.6 ………by ethnicity, gender and registration for free school meals, 2004
1.7 Pupil ethnicity by national identity, 2004
1.8 Ethnicity of asylum seekers and refugees, 2004
1.9 Schools and pupils by school denomination, 1996-2004
1.10 Size of schools, 2004

Primary
2.1 Schools and pupils in publicly funded primary schools, 1996-2004
2.2 Primary schools and pupils by school denomination, 1996-2004
2.3 Primary pupils by stage, 1997-2004
2.4 Primary pupils by age at 28th February 2005 and stage, as at September 2004
2.5 Integration of primary pupils with a Record of Needs and/or an Individualised Educational Programme, by gender, 2004
2.6 Main difficulty in learning of primary pupils with a Record of Needs and/or an Individualised Educational Programme, by gender, 2004
2.7 Primary pupils registered for free school meals, 2002 to 2004
2.8 …………………………………………… ……….by stage and gender, 2004
2.9 Primary pupil ethnicity by national identity, 2004
2.10 ………………ethnicity and stage, 2004
2.11 Average primary class sizes by type of class and stage, 1997-2004
2.12 Average primary class sizes by size of school and type of class, 2004
2.13 Number of primary classes and pupils by size and type of class, 2004
2.14 P1 single stage primary classes by size of class, 2003 to 2004
2.15 P2 …………………………………………………………………...
2.16 P3 …………………………………………………………………...
2.17 P4 ……………………………………………………………………
2.18 P5 ……………………………………………………………………
2.19 P6 ……………………………………………………………………
2.20 P7 ……………………………………………………………………

Secondary
3.1 Schools and pupils in publicly funded secondary schools, 1996-2004
3.2 Secondary schools and pupils by school denomination, 1996-2004
3.3 Secondary pupils by stage, 1997-2004
3.4 Secondary pupils by age at 28th February 2005 and stage and gender, as at September 2004
3.5 Integration of secondary pupils with a Record of Needs and/or an Individualised Educational Programme, by gender, 2004
3.6 Main difficulty in learning of secondary pupils with a Record of Needs and/or an Individualised Educational Programme, by gender, 2004
3.7 Secondary pupils registered for free school meals, 2002 to 2004
3.8 ……………………………………………………….by stage and gender, 2004
3.9 Secondary pupils by ethnicity by national identity, 2004
3.10 ……………………….ethnicity and stage, 2004
3.11 Staying on rates of secondary pupils, 1996-2004

Special

4.1 Schools and pupils in publicly funded special schools, 1996-2004
4.2 Special schools and pupils by school denomination, 1996-2004
4.3 Pupils in special schools and age at 28th February 2005 and gender, 2004
4.4 Integration of pupils based in special schools, by gender, 2003 & 2004
4.5 Main difficulty in learning of pupils based in special schools with a Record of Needs and/or an Individualised Educational Programme, 2004
4.6 Pupils based in special schools registered for free school meals, 2002 to 2004
4.7 Pupils based in special schools by gender and mode of attendance,1999 - 2004
4.8 Pupils based in special schools ethnicity by national identity, 2004

Local Authorities

All sectors
5.1 Publicly funded schools, 1996-2004
5.2 Pupils in publicly funded schools, 1996-2004
5.3 Looked after children in publicly funded schools, by age and local authority of residence
5.4 Asylum seekers and refugees in publicly funded schools

Primary
6.1 Publicly funded primary schools, 1996-2004
6.2 Pupils in publicly funded primary schools, 1998-2004
6.3 Primary schools and pupils by school denomination, 2004
6.4 Primary pupils by stage, 2004
6.5 Average primary class sizes by type of class, 2004
6.6 Average primary class size by class stage, 2004
6.7 Primary pupils with a Record of Needs and/or an Individualised Educational Programme, 2004
6.8 Main difficulty of learning for primary pupils with a Record of Needs and/or an Individualised Educational Programme, 2004
6.9 Looked after children in primary schools by local authority of school, 2004
6.10 Primary pupils by ethnicity, 2004
6.11 Primary pupils who attend schools outwith their local authority of residence, 2003 & 2004
6.12 Primary pupils who attend schools but who live outwith the local authority, 2003 & 2004

Secondary
7.1 Publicly funded secondary schools, 1996-2004
7.2 Pupils in publicly funded secondary schools, 1999-2004
7.3 Secondary schools and pupils by school denomination, 2004
7.4 Secondary pupils by stage, 2004
7.5 Main difficulty of learning for secondary pupils with a Record of Needs and/or an Individualised Educational Programme, 2004
7.6 Secondary pupils with a Record of Needs and/or an Individualised Educational Programme, 2004
7.7 Looked after children in secondary schools by local authority of school, 2004
7.8 Secondary pupils by ethnicity, 2004
7.9 Secondary pupils who attend schools outwith their local authority of residence, 2003 & 2004
7.10 Secondary pupils who attend schools but who live outwith the local authority, 2003 & 2004
7.11 Staying on rates of secondary pupils, 2004

Special
8.1 Publicly funded special schools, 1996-2004
8.2 Pupils based in publicly funded special schools, 1998-2004
8.3 Special schools and pupils by school denomination, 2004
8.4 Pupils based in special schools with a Record of Needs and/or an Individualised Educational Programme, 2004
8.5 Pupils based in special schools by age, 2004
8.6 Main difficulty of learning for pupils based in special schools with aRecord of Needs and/or an Individualised Educational Programme, 2004
8.7 Looked after children in special schools by local authority of school, 2004
8.8 Pupils based in special schools by ethnicity, 2004
8.9 Pupils based in special schools who attend schools outwith their local authority of residence, 2003 & 2004
8.10 Pupils based in special schools who attend schools but who live outwith the local authority, 2003 & 2004

School Boards

9.1 Number of eligible primary schools and percentages with a school board, by authority, May 2004
9.2 Number of eligible secondary schools and percentages with a school board, by sector, May 2004
9.3 Number of eligible special schools and percentages with a school board, by sector, May 2004
9.4 Number of eligible schools and percentages with a school board, by sector, 1992-2004

Information and Communication Technology

10.1 ICT results in primary schools, 1999-2004
10.2 ………………secondary schools, 1999-2004
10.3 ………………special schools, 1999-2004
10.4 ICT survey results by local authority, all sectors, 2004

Map of Local Authorities

Scottish Executive Statistical Services

BACKGROUND NOTES

1. Sources

1.1 The information in this publication is derived mainly from the Pupil Census from September 2004 and previous years.

2. Statistical Notes

2.1 Coverage and Timing

2.1.1 The Pupil Census covers all publicly funded schools in Scotland (local authority and grant-aided). Where a school has more than one department, for example a secondary school with a primary department, these are counted as separate schools. The census of independent schools is published separately, and will be available on the Scottish Executive website

2.1.2 Schools which provide education predominantly for children with special educational needs often have pupils from a wide age range and the data collected from this sector reflects this. Where pupils attend a 'special unit' attached to a mainstream school, they are usually included in the figures for the mainstream school. Some schools and local authorities have reported pupils from 'special units' separately.

2.1.3 Pupils who are withdrawn from school, for example, because of long-term illness, are not included in the school census returns. Information on such pupils is provided by local authorities in the annual survey of children educated outwith school, results of which are available on the Scottish Executive website http://www.scotland.gov.uk/stats/bulletins/00378-00.asp.

In 2003/04, 2,010 children were reported by local authorities to have received education outwith school at some point during the year.

2.1.4 From 2003 a separate staff census has taken place. Results of this will be published in "Teachers in Scotland, 2004", and will be available on the Scottish Executive website. www.scotland.gov.uk/stats/bulletins/00416

2.2 Census content

2.2.1 The content of the Pupil Census is considered each year in consultation with the School Education Information Advisory Group ( SEIAG). This group includes representatives from local authorities, teaching unions and headteachers associations, as well as staff from the Scottish Executive. The committee operates in the light of National Statistics guidelines, which restricts the department to collecting only the information that is required, at a level which is fit for purpose, whilst always trying to minimise the burden on data providers. Recommendations for changes to the census are made to SEIAG through the Scottish Exchange of Educational Data (ScotXed) network.

2.3 Collection methods

2.3.1 The information required to complete the September 2004 Pupil Census was collected electronically, through local authorities, from nearly all publicly funded primary, secondary and special schools, as part of the ScotXed programme. The information is generally stored on schools' management information systems, thus reducing the burden on schools.

2.3.2 ScotXed supports and promotes effective and secure data exchanges so that key partners in school education in Scotland can benefit from access to information to monitor and improve education services. Partners include local authorities, schools, the Scottish Qualifications Agency, HM Inspectorate of Education, Learning and Teaching Scotland and Scottish Executive Education Department. Further information, including specifications of the data exchanges, can be found at www.scotxed.net.

3. Definitions

3.1 Tables in this publication cover publicly funded schools only, i.e. local authority and grant-aided. Information on independent schools will be available on the Scottish Executive website http://www.scotland.gov.uk/stats/bulletins/00414

3.2 Where numbers of pupils are given, these relate to pupils based at the school. Pupils who are attending the school but are based at another centre (for example, students from a Further Education College who are taking some classes at a school) are not included.

3.3 A class is a group of pupils normally supervised by one teacher. The group may occasionally be supervised by more than one teacher, for example, when pupils are receiving learning support from a teacher who is not the class teacher.

3.4 A few schools returned data that included pupils from other schools who spend some time in their classes (see 3.2 above). In this publication only pupils on the school roll have been included in the figures in order to avoid double counting of pupils. There still remain however a few schools unable to reconcile class totals with pupil totals. This information has been published as provided. This involved a net difference of 101 pupils. If the additional pupils were excluded, the average class size would change from 23.9 to 23.8.

3.5 A composite class is a class of pupils from two or more stages, multi-stage composites include pupils from more than two stages.

3.6 The ethnic background and national identity categories were based on those collected in the 2001 population census and were agreed following consultation. Pupils and parents were given the option of not disclosing their ethnicity, and in such cases pupils were not attributed a category. About 96 per cent of pupils disclosed their ethnic background.

3.7 Figures for the special school sector are compiled from special schools and special units. There would appear to be inconsistency between schools and between local authorities in the reporting of special schools and special units as separate identities, as well as changes over the past years. We therefore advise caution when comparing results with previous years and across local authorities.

A few authorities do not have special schools, and may fund places in neighbouring authorities for their pupils.

The number of special schools includes 30 where there were no pupils based, but which received pupils based in other schools.

3.8 At September 2004 there was one grant-aided mainstream school, with primary and secondary departments, and seven grant-aided special schools. These were:

Mainstream

  • Glasgow City: Jordanhill

Special

  • City of Edinburgh: Donaldson's College; Royal Blind School; Harmeny School;
  • North Lanarkshire: The Scottish Centre for Children with Motor Impairment;
  • Glasgow City: East Park;
  • South Lanarkshire: Stanmore House School;
  • Renfrewshire: Corseford Residential School;

These schools are included in national totals, but are identified separately in the local authority level tables. In publications prior to 2003 they were included within the local authority of their location.

3.9 Free school meal data collected in the Pupil Census only counts those pupils who are registered for free school meals. Free school meal entitlement ( FME) data collected in the January School Meals Survey also includes those pupils who are deemed eligible for free school meals but who may not have registered for their entitlement, accounting for an additional 1.5 per cent of pupils. The FME indicator collected in the annual School Meals Survey was that used in funding calculations and in benchmarking schools. Information from the Pupil Census is used only where linkage to other pupil characteristics, or attainment, exclusions and attendance data is necessary.

3.10 A Record of Needs ( RoN) is provided for a child who has "pronounced, specific or complex special educational needs which require continuing review". The RoN contains the child's details; the details of the parent/guardian and "named person" (someone to represent them); an assessment profile; a summary of the child/young person's impairments; a description of the special educational needs arising from the impairments; a statement of the measures proposed by the education authority; the name of the school to be attended; a summary of the views of the parent/guardian; the date the record was opened and a summary of the reviews of the record; and a note of who is allowed to access the record.

3.11 Individualised Educational Programmes ( IEPs) are written plans setting targets that a child, with special educational needs, is expected to achieve. Targets should be limited in number and focus on key priorities of learning. They should be simple, clearly expressed and measurable.

3.12 Pupil census figures on children looked after by the local authority are published for the first time this year. While they have been collected each year since 2002, they have been evidently incomplete when compared with similar data from social work departments. They are published this year alongside the social work figures, as at 31st March 2004, for comparison.

3.13 The urban/rural classifications in Table 1.2 are defined as follows:

  • Large urban areas - settlements over 125,000 population. This covers the city conurbations of Edinburgh, Glasgow, Aberdeen and Dundee.
  • Other urban areas - settlements of 10,000 to 125,000 people.
  • Accessible small towns - settlements of between 3,000 and 10,000 people and within 30 minutes drive of a settlement of 10,000 or more.
  • Remote small towns - settlements of between 3,000 and 10,000 people, who are not within 30 minutes drive of a settlement of 10,000 or more people.
  • Accessible rural areas - settlements of less than 3,000 people and within 30 minutes drive of a settlement of 10,000 or more people
  • Remote rural areas - settlements of less than 3,000 people who are not within 30 minutes drive of a settlement of 10,000 or more people.

4. Rounding

4.1 All percentages are rounded separately and breakdowns may consequently not sum to 100 per cent.

5. Disclosive data

5.1 Numbers less than five are generally deemed to be disclosive, and hence not published. Where figures have been removed they are replaced by a *. Other figures in the table may also be removed to stop a disclosive figure from being calculated from the total.

5.2 However, in some cases where there are a large number of pupils in the unknown category, i.e. ethnic background and national identity, there often exists a large enough amount of uncertainty for figures to be published.

5.3 Occasionally, in data for grant aided schools, it has been preferable to swap a small number of data rather than removing figures elsewhere in the publication. Swapped data has still been marked as *.

6. Other data

6.1 Some further data, for example some schools level data, will be made available on the Scottish Executive website www.scotland.gov.uk/stats . Ad-hoc tables are available on request.

6.2 Analysis on a more local level (e.g. parliamentary constituency) may also be available via the Neighbourhood Statistics website - http://www.sns.gov.uk.

7. Symbols

7.1 The following symbols are used:

. . = not available
- = nil or rounds to nil
# = not applicable
* = disclosive data

8. General

8.1 This is a National Statistics publication. National Statistics are produced to high professional standards set out in the National Statistics Code of Practice. They undergo regular quality assurance reviews to ensure that they meet customer needs. They are produced free from any political interference.

8.2 The team responsible for producing this document were : Mal Cooke, Debbie Hall, Marc Goodfellow, Colin Gallacher.

8.3 All tables are available on the Scottish Executive website at

http://www.scotland.gov.uk/stats/bulletins/00412

9. Enquiries

9.1. Public enquiries (non-media) about the information contained in this bulletin should be addressed to

Mal Cooke, Education and Children Statistics Unit, Room 1B, Victoria Quay, Edinburgh EH6 6QQ. Telephone 0131 244 1689

or e-mail school.stats@scotland.gsi.gov.uk

9.2 Media enquiries about the information in this notice should be addressed to:

Marion Mackay: 0131 244 3070
12 April, 2005