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Best Value and Biodiversity in Scotland: A Handbook of Good Practice for Public Bodies

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Best Value and Biodiversity in Scotland: A HANDBOOK OF GOOD PRACTICE FOR PUBLIC BODIES

APPENDIX 2
Case Studies

PROJECT NAME: CS1 - Cuthill Park

CONTACT: Stuart Pryde

LOCAL AUTHORITY: East Lothian

OTHER PARTNERS: East Lothian Biodiversity

PHONE:spryde@eastlothian.gov.uk

PROJECT SUMMARY:

Local youths were playing golf in a neglected park, causing a nuisance by aiming at buses and an adjacent sports club. As a result, local residents were reluctant to use the park. Other teenagers were causing a nuisance by skateboarding in a residential and respite area. The park was originally dominated by amenity grass. By allowing the grass to grow, the youths playing golf were displaced and that element of antisocial behaviour was removed. Paths were cut in the new meadow and local residents started visiting the park again. Local consultation has shown that residents are delighted by the new meadow and the peace that it brings to the park. Other initiatives proposed by the public for the park include: provision of skateboard area in partnership with local teenagers; enhancing the meadow by planting wildflowers; opening up access to the park.

PROJECT NAME: CS2 - Health Enhancing Physical Activity (HEPA)

CONTACT: Fiona Jackson

LOCAL AUTHORITY: West Lothian

OTHER PARTNERS: National Health Service Lothian, BTCV Scotland, Beingwell Project, Ramblers Association, Central Scotland Forest Trust

PROJECT SUMMARY:

The HEPA project aims to get the most inactive people in West Lothian active by advocating moderate intensity physical activity. With funding from the NHS, a Project Officer has been appointed and the initiative is now in its second operational year. Healthy exercise is a cross cutting issue with the provision of access to the countryside and the environmental programme that arises from the local biodiversity plans. Consequently, this has led to the setting up of a countryside and parks sub-group to assist in the delivery of objectives of the HEPA strategy. The creation of accessible community woodlands, improving open space by habitat creation, providing practical conservation work for various 50+ volunteer groups and promoting access to managed areas of biodiversity interest, a component of the West Lothian HEPA atlas, illustrate how the various programmes are complementary.

PROJECT NAME: CS3 - Linlithgow Loch Project

CONTACT: Craig J Seath

LOCAL AUTHORITY: West Lothian

OTHER PARTNERS: Historic Scotland Ranger Service, Scottish Natural Heritage, RSPB Scotland, SSPCA, WLC External Environment, Scottish Water

PHONE: 01506 775401

PROJECT SUMMARY:

Linlithgow Loch is a SSSI with a wide diversity of wildlife, including waterfowl. However, there has been a noticeable increase in rat activity on the shores in the last few years caused, in part, by the over feeding of waterfowl by the public. In 2001, a sewer-baiting programme was started in partnership with East of Scotland Water (now Scottish Water), and in October 2001, permanent rat baiting stations were set up in the affected areas (disguised as the base of standard litter-bins). In July 2002, notices highlighting the health risks from overfeeding, both to humans and wildlife, were erected. Awareness was also raised with a leaflet campaign, in partnership with Historic Scotland, RSPB Scotland, and the SSPCA. To ensure treatment of the rat infestation wasn't detrimental to non-target species (specifically water voles, which are protected under law) there was a full survey, by SNH, in November 2002. The result of this project, and the on-going strategy, is to ensure a reduction of rat activity around the loch, and the reduction of inappropriate waterfowl feeding. This ultimately reduces health risks both to the public, and to wildlife in this important ecosystem.

PROJECT NAME: CS4 - North Edinburgh Cyclepath

CONTACT: Susan Steel/Caroline Peacock, Edinburgh LBAP Officers

LOCAL AUTHORITY: Edinburgh City

OTHER PARTNERS: including BTCV Scotland, Lothian Conservation Volunteers, and Spokes

PHONE: 0131 469 3920

PROJECT SUMMARY:

The partners are involved in management and practical projects along this network of cyclepaths. The aim is to manage the surrounding land to provide a diversity of habitats to benefit both wildlife and people. There are inherent cost savings in both managing the grassland as a wildflower meadow, due to reduced mowing requirements, and coppicing woodland to provide woodpile shelters for animals, rather than removing timber from the site.

PROJECT NAME: CS5 - Swifts and Swallows

CONTACT: Catherine Lloyd

LOCAL AUTHORITY: Angus, Dundee City and Perth & Kinross Councils

OTHER PARTNERS: Tayside Biodiversity Partnership; Concern for Swifts (Scotland)

PHONE: 01738 476481

PROJECT SUMMARY:

Still at an early stage, Angus Council Housing Department is installing simple swift nestboxes in some of its housing blocks. This has occurred since the LBAP Co-ordinator and Concern for Swifts (Scotland) circulated a best practice paper on how to plan for swifts. The nestboxes will be installed when routine work is done and scaffolding erected at the properties.

PROJECT NAME: CS6 - The Sheltered Housing Biodiversity Project See chapter 5

PROJECT NAME: CS7 - Eco-housing

CONTACT: Susan Steel/Caroline Peacock, Edinburgh LBAP Officers

LOCAL AUTHORITY: Edinburgh

OTHER PARTNERS: Malcolm Homes; Canmore Housing Association

PHONE: 0131 469 3920

PROJECT SUMMARY:

Slateford Green is an "eco-housing" development of 120 flats, built with the residents and environment in mind. It is an example of housing that is built to a high standard and is energy-efficient, so cutting climate change emissions and reducing energy bills for those living on benefits to less than 10% of their income. The area around the flats is car-free so is much safer than other parts of the city. Slateford Green, a mix of one, two, and three-bedroom flats, was opened in June 2000. The development was built using the principle of "low embodied energy" - the materials are produced using less energy than with conventional housing. The ventilation system is shared between several flats, again saving energy. There is a children's play area, a wildlife garden with a fountain, and three ponds that feed into each other. A community centre provides classes and a meeting place for the residents' association.

PROJECT NAME: CS8 - Maxwell Park

CONTACT: Sheila Russell

LOCAL AUTHORITY: Glasgow City

PHONE: 0141 287 5087

PROJECT SUMMARY:

This was a pilot project undertaken in 1998 to control the blanket weed, which choked the pond in Maxwell Park with the result that no waterbirds bred at the site. The aim was to provide a more attractive pond (both visually and for wildlife), and to give local people an interesting (rather than smelly) pond to enjoy. An island was created with "shelf" shallows around both it and the sides of the pond. The shallows were planted with emergent vegetation, the island with a wildflower mix, and the base of the pond with submerged vegetation. Although no fauna was deliberately added, some incidental transfer of invertebrates took place since most of the vegetation was from wetlands within the city. The most visible increase in biodiversity, other than vegetation, has been in waterbirds and damselflies. In less than two years a little grebe raised five young, there were four broods of moorhen, and at one count almost 50 mallard young on the pond.

PROJECT NAME: CS9 - Dedridge Burn Community Project

CONTACT: John Sheldon

LOCAL AUTHORITY: West Lothian

OTHER PARTNERS: SEPA, FCS, Bellsquarry, Murieston and Dedridge Community Councils

PHONE: 01506 775278

PROJECT SUMMARY:

What began in 1999 as an individual's request for the restoration of an oakwood in the centre of Dedridge, Livingston, has developed into a project that involves three Community Councils and covers the entire length of the Dedridge Burn, a feeder of the River Almond. The initial request led to the discovery of severe pollution of the burn that runs through the wood. The project has developed accordingly with full consultation, a community steering group and community participation. Work on removing non-native trees and re-establishing the oakwood has involved a management plan and FCS grant aid. Improving the burn has involved a clean-up, biodiversity surveys, partnership with industry and linkage with flood control planning. The long-term objective is to encourage communities to become responsible for their local natural environment.

PROJECT NAME: CS10 - Environment Supplement, WLC Newsletter to residents

CONTACT: John Sheldon

LOCAL AUTHORITY: West Lothian

OTHER PARTNERS: SNH and environmental bodies providing a service in West Lothian

PHONE: 01506 775278

PROJECT SUMMARY:

The Council's quarterly newsletter (the Bulletin) goes to 70,000 householders and is a very effective way of raising awareness and promoting individual environmental issues and stories through the year. However, since 2000, grant support from SNH has allowed a dedicated Environmental Supplement to be included in the Bulletin's spring edition, which goes to all households in March of each year. This supplement is more in-depth with contributions from LBAP partners delivering environmental services to West Lothian, where appropriate. Themes reflect cross-cutting interests and issues and, to date, have covered sustainable development, water, biodiversity, and access. The 2004 issue promoted the achievements of the River Almond Catchment Management Plan Group. The feedback from the newsletter is good, both in terms of follow-up enquiries and requests for leaflets.

PROJECT NAME: CS11 - Biodiversity Banks

CONTACT: Scott Riddell

LOCAL AUTHORITY: South Lanarkshire

OTHER PARTNERS: Powergen, South Lanarkshire Biodiversity Partnership

PHONE: 01355 806858

PROJECT SUMMARY:

In 2003, nine "Biodiversity Banks" were created in South Lanarkshire with the aim of raising the awareness of biodiversity among local communities as well as the creation of a biodiversity "storehouse" for future generations. Schools, children's groups, senior citizens and multi-cultural groups were all involved in the nurturing of wildflower seed before the planting out of the seedlings in the spring. The process drew attention to issues relating to the use of greenspace in urban areas, wildflower habitats and the use of peat-free gardening products. Signs were erected to celebrate the communities' achievements as well as highlight the project to a wider audience. This had the added benefit of successfully alleviating fears within the local authority of complaints from residents about unsightly "waste ground". All signs remain intact and free from vandalism and there have been no complaints of poor site maintenance; testament to the effort of the partnership in bringing the local communities on board. A community polytunnel was also erected at Hamilton Grammar School, providing a useful educational resource and a nursery for future biodiversity projects. Further communities have expressed interest in the project and this work will be carried forward.

PROJECT NAME: CS12 - Roley's Wood, Currie

CONTACT: Susan Steel/Caroline Peacock, Edinburgh LBAP Officers

LOCAL AUTHORITY: Edinburgh City

OTHER PARTNERS: Edinburgh Greenbelt Trust

PHONE: 0131 469 3920

PROJECT SUMMARY:

A wood, adjacent to a school where a river was previously used as a rubbish dump, is now managed as community woodland with access paths, new planting to provide sustainable woodland, and a wildlife garden. The pupils from Currie High School (after-school clubs and as part of the curriculum) manage the site. This project is widely used as a demonstration project for in-service courses, and has won several awards.

PROJECT NAME: CS13 - "glasgow woodlands" Education Pack See chapter 5

PROJECT NAME: CS14 - School Grounds

CONTACT: Sheila Russell

LOCAL AUTHORITY: Glasgow City

PHONE: 0141 287 5087

PROJECT SUMMARY:

Schools in Glasgow wishing an outdoor teaching area or landscaping can seek information from GCC (Land Services) which will provide advice or designs resulting in an increase in biodiversity: native tree or shrub planting, wildflower meadows, plants to attract insects, and occasionally a small pond or wetland. These enhancements for wildlife provide an opportunity for environmental education within school grounds at a time when school visits to other sites are restricted by financial and health and safety considerations. First-hand experience of biodiversity forms a key part of environmental education. School grounds can be developed to help provide this through opportunities for formal learning, and for informal play in a more natural setting. SNH offers a grant scheme for school ground development, and the charity Grounds for Learning provides an advisory service. School ground development forms one possible strand in the Eco Schools scheme (see CS18).

PROJECT NAME: CS15 - Wildflower Seed Collection

CONTACT: Anne MacLellan

LOCAL AUTHORITY: Comhairle nan Eilean Siar (Western Isles)

PHONE: 01870 602425

PROJECT SUMMARY:

In 2002, as a result of Scottish Biodiversity Week local primary school children were involved in collecting wildflower seeds as the Council's engineers and landscape architect were keen to use locally sourced seed on roadside verges in road projects, e.g. Eriskay Causeway. A "wildflower seed bank" has been established for use in future projects. Economic gain: seed was provided free for use on road projects, so savings were made as grass seed need not be purchased. Biodiversity gain: locally sourced seed resulting in the growth of native species. This provides a food source and the resulting growth looks more natural and helps road improvements blend in to the surrounding environment more quickly. Social gain: schoolchildren enjoyed being out of doors and learning about their local area and the plants found there. Worksheets were provided for the children to undertake some further research back in the classroom.

PROJECT NAME: CS16 - West Craigie Farm

CONTACT: Susan Steel/Caroline Peacock, Edinburgh LBAP Officers

LOCAL AUTHORITY: Edinburgh City

OTHER PARTNERS: FWAG, Edinburgh Green Belt Trust (EGBT)

PHONE: 0131 469 3920

PROJECT SUMMARY:

The owner of West Craigie Farm has cut down his use of pesticides to a minimum and operates a wildlife friendly approach to farming. A FWAG evening walk was held to raise awareness amongst other farmers showing that the approach at West Craigie Farm is compatible with running a profitable business.

PROJECT NAME: CS17 - Eco-Congregation Awards

CONTACT: Margaret Warnock

LOCAL AUTHORITY: Scotland-wide

OTHER PARTNERS: Keep Scotland Beautiful

PHONE: 01786 471333

PROJECT SUMMARY:

Eco-Congregation helps local churches consider environmental issues and take practical action. Written resources focus on areas of church life such as: worship and preaching; children's and youth work; management of premises; finance; catering and purchasing. One module deals specifically with managing church grounds and land and encourages churches, whether they have a small urban plot or a large rural churchyard, to look at managing their patch with biodiversity in mind. Much of the information is also relevant to homes and workplaces. Churches are encouraged to work with local authorities, community groups and schools, many of which use the sister Eco Schools initiative (see CS18). Support for the programme is available on the web, 35 in newsletters, through links to appropriate local authority officers and environmental bodies. The programme has an award scheme to further encourage the good work of churches. Over 30 congregations across Scotland are exploring how they can get involved, with more than 30 well on their way with environmental actions and projects; eight have now achieved the Eco-Congregation Award. Eco-Congregation has the full backing of ACTS (Action of Churches Together in Scotland) and all the major Scottish denominations.

PROJECT NAME: CS18 - Eco Schools Programme

CONTACT: Kate Campbell, Eco Schools Scotland

LOCAL AUTHORITY: Scotland-wide

OTHER PARTNERS: Private schools

PHONE: 01786 468232, or 01786 468234 for general enquiries

PROJECT SUMMARY:

Eco Schools is a programme for environmental management and certification, and promotes learning about biodiversity as a part of sustainable development education for schools. It achieves this through presenting school grounds development as an activity, and by encouraging schools to become involved in biodiversity learning and conservation outwith the school. It is an ideal way for schools to embark on improving the school environment. It develops responsible attitudes and commitment by students both at home and in the wider community, and in influencing the lives of young people, school staff, families, local authorities, NGOs, etc. It provides an integrated system for environmental management of schools based on an ISO14001/EMAS approach. The Eco Schools Green Flag, awarded to schools with high achievement in their programme, is a recognised and respected eco-label for environmental education and performance. SNH offers a grant scheme for school ground development, and the charity Grounds for Learning provides an advisory service. The Scottish Executive recognises participation in Eco Schools as a performance indicator for the Citizenship National Priority for Schools. Check the UK 36 and International 37 websites for more information.

PROJECT NAME: CS19 - Boundaries, Banks and Birds Farm Grants

CONTACT: John Sheldon

LOCAL AUTHORITY: West Lothian

OTHER PARTNERS: SNH, SAC, FWAG

PHONE: 01506 775278

PROJECT SUMMARY:

Partnership funding from SNH and West Lothian Council supports a 32.5k grant that is available for farm projects. This local grant scheme has been running since 1998 to promote biodiversity projects. In 2003/04 the grant focused on the catchment of the Mains Burn, a tributary of the River Almond. SAC and FWAG advisers visited all farmers. The objective is to identify projects that deliver the 4-Point Plan, which targets the minimisation of pollution, and the enhancement of biodiversity. It is also designed to encourage good agricultural practice in relation to waste management.

PROJECT NAME: CS20 - Ethicon Biodiversity Plan

CONTACT: John Sheldon

LOCAL AUTHORITY: West Lothian

OTHER PARTNERS: Ethicon, Oatridge Agricultural College, BTCV Scotland

PHONE: 01506 775278

PROJECT SUMMARY:

Ethicon, and its global parent company Johnson & Johnson, are keen to improve the environment for neighbouring communities and biodiversity, to meet its environmental strategy. Grassland around the industrial complex, in Livingston, was regularly mown by the company, had little apparent biodiversity interest, and was not used by staff or adjoining residents. Aware of the West Lothian LBAP the groundsman sought advice and the initiative to develop a partnership biodiversity action plan began. The company, with the assistance of Oatridge Agricultural College, BTCV Scotland, the Council's ranger service and the local community have set out on the task to improve the grassland for biodiversity and amenity. The close mowing of wet areas has stopped and this has allowed orchids to flower. Other flower rich areas have mown paths through them to attract local walkers to use what is now more attractive wild grassland. Surveys of community opinions and wildlife have been undertaken and a photographic record is being maintained.

PROJECT NAME: CS21 - Loch Ossian Youth Hostel Refurbishment

CONTACT: Karen Anderson, Scottish Youth Hostel Association

LOCAL AUTHORITY: Highland

OTHER PARTNERS: Visit Scotland, SNH, SEPA, Green Tourism Business Scheme, Fresh Futures

PHONE: 01786 891400

PROJECT SUMMARY:

The sympathetic refurbishment of Loch Ossian Youth Hostel underlines the SYHA's original commitment as a not-for-profit body to provide accommodation in some of Scotland's more remote but most beautiful areas. A former boathouse on Loch Ossian, the hostel building was first leased to the SYHA in 1931, providing walkers, ramblers and nature-lovers with comfortable but basic accommodation in a highland setting. Unfortunately, the years had taken their toll on the building and its fabric was badly in need of more than just routine maintenance to keep it standing. The result has been a hugely successful environmental project for the SYHA, which has included a renovated eco-friendly structure, renewable energy, ecologically sound water and waste disposal systems, which take into account the fragile local environment.

PROJECT NAME: CS22 - Stirling's Biodiversity Trails

CONTACT: Chris Waddell

LOCAL AUTHORITY: Stirling

OTHER PARTNERS: Tourist Development Stirling Council, SNH, LL&TNP

PHONE: 01786 442768

PROJECT SUMMARY:

This leaflet identifies existing sites in the Stirling area that have good parking and are easily accessible by foot, public transport or car. Four thousand leaflets were printed for launch in 2003, and can be viewed on the Stirling Council 38 website. In order to engage people with biodiversity, and to provide easy access, a leaflet based on a biodiversity trail was designed. The leaflet highlights places that are easy to get to, but which were not necessarily well known to locals or visitors. The leaflet and biodiversity trail informed the local business community of the investment potential of biodiversity through increased revenue generated by higher visitor numbers. As well as the trail being an educational resource about safeguarding local biodiversity, the trail also provides a tourist orientated focus on the landscape and biodiversity of Stirling and the National Park, and acts as a prompt to local eco-tourism businesses.

PROJECT NAME: CS23 - Beinn an Tuirc

CONTACT: David MacArthur

LOCAL AUTHORITY: Argyll & Bute

OTHER PARTNERS: Scottish Power, Management Committee (SNH, RSPB Scotland, Argyll and Bute Council, Scottish Power)

PHONE: 0141 568 2992

PROJECT SUMMARY:

Beinn an Tuirc Wind Farm is 10 miles (16 km) north of Campbelltown. The 680 ha (1,680 acre) site lies on the slopes of Beinn an Tuirc, which is the highest hill on the Kintyre Peninsula. Brian Wilson, the Government Energy Minister, opened the wind farm in 2002, which cost 21 million to construct. It comprises forty-six turbines, each standing 40m (130 feet) high and capable of generating 600kW of power. Despite the relatively remote location, care was taken to minimise the visual impact of the turbines as seen from local villages. A condition of the development required the protection of a pair of endangered golden eagles, which ranged over the area. This involved the clearance of trees to create a moorland habitat for red grouse and hare, intended to act as prey for the eagles and divert them away from the turbines to minimise the risk of collision. The farm is owned by Scottish Power, who has appointed a ranger to manage the local environment and ensure continued protection for the eagles, together with other species, including black grouse.

PROJECT NAME: CS24 - The Islay Wave Bus

CONTACT: Michael McRae

LOCAL AUTHORITY: Argyll & Bute

OTHER PARTNERS: C&H Bradbury Ltd (for Greenpeace), Islay Development Company (IDC), Wavegen, Scottish and Southern Energy plc, Argyll and the Islands Enterprise (AIE)

PHONE: 01355 806858

PROJECT:

The Islay Wave Bus is the first electric bus in the world to be powered by wave energy, and is for local transportation needs by local community groups. It is powered by the LIMPET wave machine (developed by Wavegen) being the only commercially operating wave power station in the UK. Scottish and Southern plc have allocated electricity generated by the LIMPET to the bus operators, covering the charging needs of the bus. Fuel costs per mile are around one-third of that necessary to run equivalent diesel buses. AIE, the local enterprise company, is providing financial support towards running costs and maintenance over the next 3 years. The bus has a range of around 40 miles per day, and can reach a maximum speed of about 30mph. A full recharge of the batteries takes 10 hours (overnight). As the Wave Bus doesn't use petrol or diesel it emits no exhaust pollution, so has a minimal local environmental impact. Although this feature is common to all electric vehicles, in this instance the electricity used for recharging comes from a renewable energy source i.e. the electricity generating process doesn't produce carbon dioxide: the main cause of global warming.

PROJECT NAME: CS25 - Earth Sciences and Local Biodiversity

CONTACT: John Sheldon

LOCAL AUTHORITY: West Lothian

OTHER PARTNERS: Lothian and Borders Regionally Important Geological and Geomorphological Sites (RIGS) Group, British Geological Survey, SLF, SAC

PHONE: 01506 775278

PROJECT SUMMARY:

Geology is an important determinant of local biodiversity, but the link is little understood and generally much neglected as an issue of sustainable development. The West Lothian LBAP is founded on an interpretation of the geology and geomorphology of the area. Through an active working partnership with the Lothian and Borders RIGS Group, the Council is committed to raising awareness of earth sciences and the conservation of important geological sites through Local Plan policy. The programme has included a review of soils for their future sustainable use against a background of increasing development planning. This will aid planners in ensuring that the storage and reuse of soils is controlled so that their use in future habitat creation and green space provision meets scientific and best practice standards.

PROJECT NAME: CS26 - Bingham's Pond

CONTACT: Sheila Russell

LOCAL AUTHORITY: Glasgow City

OTHER PARTNERS:

Glasgow City Council (Land Services), LandTrust (Landfill tax), Kelvin Clyde Greenspace, SNH, West End Area Committee, and SEPA

PHONE: 0141 287 5087

PROJECT SUMMARY:

The pond supported about 90 mute swans that were fed daily despite notices asking people to refrain. The immediate aim of the project was to address the local community's concerns regarding swan faeces (disease, dangers of slipping). Further aims were to enhance the site visually; provide the public with an attractive place to visit; and control swans numbers. Swans were removed from the site for the construction phase of the project, to prevent injury. Two islands were developed creating suitable breeding habitat for mute swans, mallard, etc. Residents have been involved throughout. There have been economic, social and biodiversity gain (both directly through planting, and indirectly by the arrival of birds, and invertebrates). In the long-term, this project will reduce the need to remove swan faeces. Socially, as the community are involved they feel 'ownership' of the site so keep an eye on the pond and use the area for recreational and educational activities. Biodiversity has benefited, and will continue to do so as the vegetation becomes more established and continues to increase. GCC (Land Services) will be responsible for overall maintenance. The community wishes to see improved seating, bins, and planting up under trees surrounding the site with bluebells, which will be delivered. Interpretation to try to prevent excessive feeding of swans by the public will be drawn up.

PROJECT NAME: CS27 - Nesting birds on bridges

CONTACT: Mick Canham, FES

LOCAL AUTHORITY: Highland

OTHER PARTNERS: Forest Enterprise Scotland

PHONE: 01343 820223

PROJECT SUMMARY:

Modern cast concrete bridges have very few, if any, cracks or crevices compared with traditionally built stone bridges of the last century. These imperfections provided nesting opportunities for birds like dippers and wagtails, and roost sites for bats. When a bridge within a forest was built, or rebuilt, changes were made at the planning stage to the design allowing small crevices to be created in the structure. Monitoring in the early stages of the project proved that this approach was very successful.

PROJECT NAME: CS28 - Green Graveyard Initiative

CONTACT: Catherine Lloyd

LOCAL AUTHORITY: Angus, Perth & Kinross

OTHER PARTNERS: Tayside Biodiversity Partnership

PHONE: 01738 476481

PROJECT SUMMARY:

This initiative involves the local community in enhancing historical graveyards such as Kinnoull and Greyfriars in the centre of Perth, and Kirklands in Kinross. It will improve currently undermanaged "wildlife conservation" areas by reviewing management to enhance the graveyards' biodiversity with people in mind. Local history and art societies, local schools, and groups such as the Women's Institute and Murray Royal Hospital Gardens are likely to be involved. As the graveyards are important places in their own right (e.g. the wife and son of the artist Millais are buried at Kinnoull; Greyfriars is on the site of a medieval monastery), visitors to the city will be encouraged to enjoy the tranquillity and biodiversity of these places. A Victorian planting scheme of wild flowers is being considered at Kinnoull, and a medieval planting scheme for Greyfriars.

PROJECT NAME: CS29 - Musselburgh species-rich sown grassland

CONTACT: Stuart MacPherson, East Lothian LBAPO

LOCAL AUTHORITY: East Lothian

PHONE: 01620 827242

PROJECT SUMMARY:

A 20-acre grassland area was mown, historically, with an amenity cut, although the location meant there was no need for this. A new management scheme was developed to reduce staff and financial resources devoted to this area. Wildflowers were planted by local school children and wildflower seed was sown to create a wildflower meadow. Paths were cut through the area to encourage people to walk through the meadow. Because of the size, a local farmer takes a hay crop from the field in late summer, and gains a small profit from the enterprise. A more attractive and useful landscape has been created, providing a habitat for grey partridge, skylark and brown hare. The grass is kept short through the winter so providing a roost for local waders. The new landscape is self-maintaining and does not require overt management by the Council. The previous amenity management cost 5,000 per year and took half a man-day per week to implement. Current management is cost-free and staff time can be devoted to more high amenity areas.

PROJECT NAME: CS30 - Callander Meadows

CONTACT: Chris Waddell

LOCAL AUTHORITY: Stirling

OTHER PARTNERS: Loch Lomond and the Trossachs Interim Committee Ranger Service, Community Council

PHONE: 01786 442768

PROJECT SUMMARY:

Callander Meadows is a mix of amenity grassland, scrub woodland, and managed meadow offering a variety of recreational activities. The site is part of the park situated next to the River Teith, historically used as a hay meadow. In 1999 a project to increase the biodiversity of the park, by reducing the frequency of mowing, was started. Biodiversity conservation gain includes an increased variety of grasses and flowering plants in the area (from source seed brought down in winter floods), and many invertebrate and small mammals species have been newly noted in the park. The cost of one annual meadow cut (in July) and associated baling is less than five amenity cuts, with the opportunity of selling the annual cut as hay currently being investigated. Socially the park is offering more to the visitor as the area is very peaceful and attractive with the meadow flowers and long grasses. There are also educational interpretation boards, and donated benches along the footpath so people of all ages and abilities can enjoy the experience. Valuable experience has been gained in terms of the practicalities of managing grassland for biodiversity, and in involving the local community in the process.

PROJECT NAME: CS31 - Viewforth grounds maintenance project See chapter 5

PROJECT NAME: CS32 - Lewisvale Park and Wildflowers

CONTACT: Andrew Hogarth

LOCAL AUTHORITY: East Lothian

OTHER PARTNERS: East Lothian Biodiversity

E-MAIL: ahogarth@eastlothian.gov.uk

PROJECT SUMMARY:

Lewisvale Park was restored in keeping with its original formal and "Edwardian" design. The soil in one area of the park was very poor with the grass growing unsuccessfully. Instead of importing topsoil and artificially fertilising the area, a mix of wildflower annuals was sown with the help of local school children. The meadow is very colourful throughout the summer and has been very popular with visitors and local residents. A path cut through the meadow encourages people to explore the area and links two woodland walks that had previously been separated by a patchy and poor looking lawn.

PROJECT NAME: CS33 - White Burn Environment Project

CONTACT: John Sheldon

LOCAL AUTHORITY: West Lothian

OTHER PARTNERS: SEPA, Scottish Water, CSFT, Whitburn Community Council

PHONE: 01506 775278

PROJECT SUMMARY:

The dumping of rubbish, pollution from sewage and mine water, and the urbanisation of the White Burn, Whitburn, had led to the degradation of the burn that had once run through open countryside. In 1996 its water quality was very low (Grade D) and it had become an open drain, which only encouraged further misuse. The problem was brought to the Council and since then a comprehensive action plan has brought partners, finance and community interests together. The burn has been transformed. Its water quality is now B, fly tipping has all but stopped, footpaths have been upgraded, bank erosion dealt with, and native woodlands planted. The problem of sewage was traced back to poorly designed drains and through the joint working of SEPA, Scottish Water and the Council this 30 year old hazard has been removed. All the primary schools have been involved and the "Yellow Fish" campaign was run twice in the town. A mark of success of all this has been the discovery of water voles.

PROJECT NAME: CS34 - Living Landscapes

CONTACT: Siobhan McDermott, Scottish Borders Council (SBC) or Derek Robeson, Borders FWAG

LOCAL AUTHORITY: Scottish Borders

OTHER PARTNERS: Borders FWAG, SNH

PHONE: SBC 01835 824000 ext 5425, or Borders FWAG 01835 824718

PROJECT SUMMARY:

The scheme ran from 1988 as the Borders Tree Grant Scheme, funded by Scottish Borders Council. It offers grants for farmers, schools, and community groups to plant hedgerows and small woodlands. 45km of hedgerow and 125,000 trees have been planted. The scheme was then re-launched in 2003 as Living Landscapes, with a landscape and whole farm emphasis. In 2003 it was proposed the scheme would administer 184K on hedgerow and small woodland grants over three years (funding from SBC, SNH, HLF, Leader+).

PROJECT NAME: CS35 - Fallin's Future

CONTACT: John Thomson, Fallin's Future

LOCAL AUTHORITY: Stirling

OTHER PARTNERS: Forward Scotland, Paterson's of Greenoakhill

PHONE: 07765 285222

PROJECT SUMMARY:

Fallin's Future is a local community group of about 18-20 members drawn from other groups in the villages and interested individuals. Fallin's Future hold regular meetings with other local agencies to progress agreed projects. A current project involves reclaiming some derelict land and improving pathways, planting trees and wild flowers, to make a mini country park and to encourage wildlife back to the area. They have also distributed three hundred compost bins, to every resident who wanted one, throughout the eastern villages of Fallin, Throsk, Cowie and Plean.

PROJECT NAME: CS36 - Sustainable Urban Drainage Schemes (SUDS)

CONTACT: John Sheldon

LOCAL AUTHORITY: West Lothian

OTHER PARTNERS: SEPA

PHONE: 01506 775278

PROJECT SUMMARY:

The Bathgate Area Local Plan was the first in the UK that included policies to ensure the application of SUDS techniques to treat urban water run-off. West Lothian Council has built on this and SUDS are now a standard requirement of all development. The published advice available still concentrates on the engineering response, with the added value of landscape and biodiversity enhancement of wetland schemes etc. still to be generally recognised. Through planning conditions and the training of its professional staff WLC is committed to ensuring SUDS techniques meet these additional benefits, as well as meeting the strategic objectives of improving water quality of its river catchments. A soil survey analysis is providing further guidance on the future applications of SUDS against a background of increasing rainfall levels and the various drainage capabilities of soils. The initial motive for the project was to establish SUDS as a key development planning issue, resulting in environmental and biodiversity gains through the effective application of SUDS techniques as an integral component of development schemes. The main constraints to the delivery of the project was developer resistance, their training needs, and the learning curve for everyone involved, which were overcome through consistent application of the planning policy, staff training and guidance on design.

PROJECT NAME: CS37 - Biodiversity Assessment of proposed Local Plan Housing Sites See chapter5

PROJECT NAME: CS38 - Golf Course Wetland Creation

CONTACT: Neil Morgan, Auchterarder Golf Club

LOCAL AUTHORITY: Perth & Kinross

OTHER PARTNERS: SEPA (Habitats Enhancement Initiative), Fresh Futures grant scheme, Scottish Golf Environment Group

PHONE: 01764 662804

PROJECT SUMMARY:

In a joint project between Perth & Kinross Council and Auchterarder Golf Club a wetland has been designed as a part of a sustainable drainage system incorporating conservation value, community involvement, and primary water treatment. This project was developed by the golf club, a voluntary organisation, in connection with the environment officer for Perth & Kinross Council. Although contractors carried out much of the work, voluntary green keepers also contributed. The project created a:

  • large pool with an island and concrete spillway;

  • large wetland pool that adds an additional golfing challenge as well as providing educational and recreational resource;

  • system providing primary water treatment and retention;

  • programme of planting and seeding of a range of wetland plants, grasses and wild flowers; and

  • site that can further develop and provide recreational and educational benefits.

PROJECT NAME: CS39 - Healthy Roots See chapter 5

PROJECT NAME: CS40 - Angus Glens Walking Festival

CONTACT: Scott Petrie

LOCAL AUTHORITY: Angus

OTHER PARTNERS: Tayside Biodiversity Partnership, Angus Rural Partnership, Angus and Dundee Tourist Board

PHONE: Angus Rural Partnership 01307 473788

PROJECT SUMMARY:

Following a highly successful inaugural festival in 2003, the second Angus Glens Walking Festival ran in June 2004. In an analysis of the economic impact of the festival in 2003, it was determined that over 350 individual walkers attended, of whom 46% stayed overnight (10% camping and 80% staying in hotels). Although no figures were available for 2004, at the time of going to print there were over 700 bookings (nearly 600 for the walks and over 100 for the evening events). The Angus Council Ranger Service again played a major role, with a presentation on the flora and fauna of the Angus Glens, raising the awareness of many issues including dog control in the uplands, and how keeping to designated footpaths can prevent disturbance to nesting birds. The Tayside Biodiversity Partnership's display boards were prominently displayed during the event, together with the introductory biodiversity booklet.

PROJECT NAME: CS41 - Species-rich Road Verges

CONTACT: Maria Hardy, North East Scotland LBAP Co-ordinator

LOCAL AUTHORITY: Aberdeenshire

OTHER PARTNERS: Friends of the Earth, SNH, National Environmental Research Council, NESLBAP, and others

PHONE: 01224 711120

PROJECT SUMMARY:

Road verge management is meeting targets in the Species-rich Grassland HAP (of the North East Scotland LBAP), on selected important verge sites. This HAP promotes action for a number of UK Priority and Broad Habitats, two UK Priority Species, and three Locally Important Species. Cutting will be less frequent and later in the year, with indicative posts highlighting the sites to contractors demonstrating a commitment to environmental and conservation issues. A consultant surveyed road verge grassland and produced a list of priority sites for biodiversity management. Aberdeenshire Council Roads Department have started to manage species-rich verges more sympathetically, to maintain and improve the diversity. The department have been proactive in identifying a number of sites around Aberdeenshire for reduced and amended maintenance to support biodiversity, including the introduction of a "conservation-type" cut within standards of service for grass maintenance. In recognition of a lack of local provenance seed, a local wildflower seed project is being developed at Easter Anguston Farm in Peterculter. Initially, potted wildflowers will be sold in the farm shop, but the aim is to produce a source of wildflower seeds for larger scale wildflowers projects. Any savings are being channelled into further development of biodiversity and areas such as tree planting.

PROJECT NAME: CS42 - Roadside Verges

CONTACT: Stuart MacPherson

LOCAL AUTHORITY: East Lothian

OTHER PARTNERS: East Lothian Council Transport Services

PHONE: 01620 827242

PROJECT SUMMARY:

Roadside verges are cut twice per year in accordance with Scottish Wildlife Trust recommendations. In addition, road verges are cut with blades held at a 45° angle. The aim is to provide a neat road edge whilst allowing plants away from the roadside to grow and flower. Some verges are being studied to quantify the benefits, although this will take some time. There is some visual evidence that the project is helping to maintain wildflowers in the sward.

PROJECT NAME: CS43 - Community BAP (CBAP)

CONTACT: Nicky Davies, Living Shetland Project

LOCAL AUTHORITY: Shetland

OTHER PARTNERS: the local community

PHONE: 01595 690832

PROJECT SUMMARY:

CBAPs were written for Fetlar, Bressay, Yell, Sandwick and Bigton. Living Shetland Community Representatives spent early 2003 consulting individuals on their thoughts about the biodiversity, both threatened and not, within their community. This information together with a detailed description of the current biodiversity status was collated into a CBAP. The main actions that the community agreed were needed to help halt the loss of biodiversity were tabulated. Actions include:

  • Fetlar Museum Trust and local volunteers are recording, storing and interpreting local biodiversity information at the Fetlar Interpretive Centre, preventing the loss of local knowledge.

  • On Bressay, the Interpretation Project installed boards explaining the history of, and the wildlife seen in, Noss Sound for visitors to the island. This complements the new way-marked trail established on the island for inhabitants and visitors alike. This project involves SNH,
    the Council, Shetland Tourism, and Shetland Amenity Trust.

  • Yell community encourage the Council to review verge-cutting policy, allowing a more flexible approach to roadside verge management, and so conserving biodiversity. Volunteers monitor roadside verges that have been identified as important locally.

Each CBAP informs Shetland's overall LBAP.

PROJECT NAME: CS44 - Road Verges

CONTACT: Technical Department

LOCAL AUTHORITY: Orkney

OTHER PARTNERS: SNH, Orkney Field Club

PHONE: 01856 873535

PROJECT SUMMARY:

The road verges have been surveyed and all conservation verges have been noted for their species diversity. The cutting and maintenance of the verges is done in conjunction with the advice of the Orkney Field Club and SNH. There is a policy in place to aid with the implementation of the maintenance. Benefits include cost and time savings, which allows the council to direct resources to other areas within of the Road Services department. The benefits to biodiversity are that the verges have been locally protected and that continued maintenance is determined by this designation. Many of the wild flower verges have been given specific cutting regimes that allow the plants to prosper and go to seed as well as providing for the invertebrate life to benefit. This restores the beauty of the road sides, is resource saving, and benefits biodiversity.

PROJECT NAME: CS45 - Golspie Recycling and Environment Action Network (GREAN)

CONTACT: Fergus Morrison, GREAN

LOCAL AUTHORITY: Highland

OTHER PARTNERS:

Scottish Co-op, Ross-shire Waste Action Network (RoWAN), Community Recycling Network for Scotland (CRNS), Voluntary Groups (East Sutherland) (VG(ES)), SNH, SEPA, WHAM, Local Enterprise Company (CASE), Agenda 21, WRAP, SCVO-New Deal, Highland Council-Social Work, Key Housing

PHONE: 01408 634253

PROJECT SUMMARY:

Established in 2000, GREAN has a village-wide focus on waste minimisation such as paper and cardboard shredding, composting and vermiculture. They aim to divert 85% of Golspie's waste paper from landfill by 2005. Essential support came from VG(ES) in the form of staff time to the project especially with developing the business plan. Important early funding support from the local councillor (donated 200 from his discretionary fund), which pound for pound was at least as critical as the further monies received. This has led Golspie to become a model of how a community can take effective action to reduce adverse impact on the local environment.

PROJECT NAME: CS46 - Biodiversity Mosaic Initiative See chapter 5

PROJECT NAME: CS47 - Fife Community Plan: A Stronger Future for Fife

CONTACT: Rachel Sherman, Fife LBAP Co-ordinator

LOCAL AUTHORITY: Fife

OTHER PARTNERS: Fife Health Board, CVS Fife, Communities Scotland, Scottish Enterprise Fife, Fife Constabulary, Business Community, and all members of strategic partnerships.

PHONE: 01592 413437

PROJECT SUMMARY:

One of the six key themes of the Fife Community Plan (revised edition, 2003) is "Safeguard and Improve Fife's Environment". The Fife Environmental Network (FEN), one of eight strategic partnerships within the Fife Community Planning framework, was tasked with "delivering a continuously improving high quality environment within Fife capable of supporting our communities now and in the future". In order to achieve this vision, FEN has produced the "Take a Pride in Fife" (TAPIF) Strategy, providing a focus for environmental effort in Fife. The Fife Biodiversity Partnership provides valuable input to the TAPIF Strategy through the implementation of the LBAP ("Action for Biodiversity 2003-2006"), which focuses on Farmland, Urban, Coastal Fringe, Rivers, and Monitoring & Information. The LBAP is fully integrated with the TAPIF Strategy, ensuring practical biodiversity action brought about by the LBAP is part of a Fife-wide effort to achieve the Natural Heritage Key Measures listed in the TAPIF Strategy. 39 Progress on the implementation of the Fife Community Plan and the TAPIF Strategy is measured through the annual State of Fife and State of the Environment Reports respectively.

PROJECT NAME: CS48 - A Guide to Incorporating Biodiversity into Local Services See chapter 8

PROJECT NAME: CS49 - Building Better Biodiversity See chapter 8