We are testing a new beta website for gov.scot go to new site

Progress with Complexity: The 2003 Local Reports - Short Reviews of Social Work Services in Scottish Local Authorities

Listen

Short Reviews of Social Work Services in Scottish Local Authorities

logoCOMHAIRLE NAN EILEAN SIAR

Overview

Social work services in Eilean Siar are provided more closely with local communities than anywhere else in Scotland. From this excellent base, over recent years the authority has developed high quality services, especially community care services. Future needs are changing significantly with continuing changes in the population, particularly the increase in the number of older people and the large reduction in the working age population.

The authority needs to continue to develop if it is to meet these challenges. In particular, it will need excellent joint working across health, education and social work and whilst these have been strengths of the authority before, they now show some signs of weakening at the very time they should be developing even further. Eilean Siar is no longer at the leading edge of joined-up provision of services as once it was and where it should be.

The Council's achievements include:

  • a consistently high rate of older people receiving care at home;
  • a high rate of older people receiving more than 20 hours home care per week, although the rate has reduced recently;
  • the recent increase in the number of home care packages developed and provided in Lewis and Harris - now to be offered in other parts of the islands; and
  • successfully implementing Free Personal Care.

The Council urgently needs to:

  • review its approach to jointly planning and delivering services across education, social work and health;
  • make sure that it delivers at least 75% of reports for Children's Hearings on time (at 74%, the authority is very close to the national target);
  • make sure all schools have a designated teacher with an overview of children and young people who are looked after; and
  • use an effective assessment tool (Asset or YLS/CMI) in all youth justice cases and train staff to use it effectively.

It should also give priority to:

  • drawing together support for carers into a single strategy framework;
  • preparing an action plan to put the Mental Health Act into practice, using information from the current review of mental health services;
  • improving discharge planning for people leaving detoxification units;
  • recruiting more foster carers;
  • improving the educational attainment of looked after children;
  • agreeing plans to improve mental health services for children and young people who are looked after;
  • developing a youth crime strategy that is appropriate to the needs of the area, making sure that a range of programmes are available to young people;
  • responding to the recommendations of Supporting Frontline staff in a way which is appropriate to the needs of the area;
  • reducing the vacancy rate among children's services staff; and
  • developing further joint working arrangements with the health services.

Community Care

Services for older people

From figures provided by the Council (but not yet confirmed), at the moment there are 61 households receiving intensive home-based care of more than 20 hours a week. Of these 61 households, 15 receive support from the mobile overnight support service and 12 receive extra evening support.

The Council has developed new services, such as overnight support, and also bought extra home packages. Overnight support is jointly funded by the Council and NHS Western Isles. The area covered at the moment represents 70% of the total island population. The number of places in residential care has remained static, but the waiting time for residential care has fallen as more users have been able to be cared for at home. Major progress has been made on reducing delayed discharges from hospital. The latest figures provided by the Council suggest that the number of patients in hospital but ready for discharge fell from 31 to 13 between July 2002 and July 2003. The reduction was achieved through continuing growth in home support options, increasingly through joint-funded initiatives.

In Uist and Barra, a rapid response team is provided by generic health and social work services. A FAST team (effectively a jointly funded team) provides rapid response for Lewis and Harris. The main focus of the team is to:

  • increase the number of people who can leave hospital as soon as they are able;
  • assess home care needs quickly; and
  • provide resources to help people to live independently once they leave hospital.

Comprehensive shopping and household maintenance are included in generic care packages. The Council has introduced increasing numbers of intensive home care packages on Lewis and Harris. These packages will be extended to the whole of the Western Isles. Crossroads have been appointed to provide short-break services in Harris and Alzheimer Scotland to provide them in Lewis. They jointly provide services in Barra and Uist.

The Council has not faced any problems with putting Free Personal Care into practice, and less that 10% of clients have to pay for care. The Council contacted all current service users to identify those who qualified for Free Personal Care, issued leaflets and publicity to people who receive care at home, highlighting the change, and told all users who would need an assessment or reassessment. Free Personal Care has become part of the single shared assessment and forms a distinct part of the assessment process.

Services for people with learning disabilities

The number of people receiving a service for learning disabilities increased gradually between 2000 and 2002.

The Council currently pays for about six people with learning difficulties who live on the mainland. There is one local area co-ordinator linked with a supported training and employment project on Uist and Barra.

Social work has one learning disability manager for residential, respite and day care for Lewis and Harris. The community care line manager in Uist covers community care generally, and people with learning disabilities are included in this. People with learning disabilities are referred and assessed through the generic community care process and are offered a package including some of the specialist services supplied by the manager for residential respite care and day care. Training programmes with the further education college and supported employment are offered as alternatives to day care. There are supported volunteering services for people who are not able to move into supported employment.

People with challenging needs are supported in the residential service, and the learning disability nurses are part of this process. The Council pays for places in homes on the mainland that are registered to care for people with a mental illness. Funding from the Change Fund is to be used to appoint another area co-ordinator to develop a database on people with learning disabilities.

Services for people with physical disabilities

A scheme is now in place for Direct Payments. There is no independent market locally, but there is a range of voluntary sector services and private arrangements with admin support being organised at the moment through the voluntary sector. There is likely to be an increase in the number of people on Direct Payments in Eilean Siar.

The Council has contracted out the assessment for and some provision of equipment and adaptations to the NHS occupational therapy service. Recommendations for major and permanent adaptations go to the housing department, and the individual occupational therapist negotiates extra funding with the social work manager. There is a proposal for an equipment store that will bring together community nursing and social care equipment that will be accessible as part of the same care package.

People with sensory impairment

There is a support worker for people with sensory impairment who is a service provider and a link to other specialist services. This worker provides assessment, equipment, referrals on and advocacy. Western Isles know of no deafblind people but admit that the process of sharing such information with Health is not well joined up. The Council should consider developing this further with Health.

Services for people with mental health difficulties

The Council still has to complete a plan for putting the new Mental Health Act into practice, and has started by commissioning a review of mental health services. The mental health partnership meets every four to six weeks and involves statutory and voluntary agencies and users and carers. The Council is reviewing the role of Mental Health Officers (MHOs) as part of its preparations to introduce the new Mental Health Act.

Mental health problems are assessed and delivered by a generic community care team. Day care and day services are generic but include people with mental health problems. The Council has commissioned projects from voluntary organisations for people with needs that are not covered by the main services.

Mentally disordered offenders are included within these arrangements and are usually picked up through the criminal justice system. The Care Programme Approach includes these offenders and uses HONOS to assess risk.

Tackling substance misuse

Generic community care teams cover addiction social work. The Council brings in specialist services jointly through the Lifestyle Centre and the Church of Scotland Alcohol and Drug Counselling Service in Lewis and Harris. In Uist the Health Board funds a substance misuse worker. Alcohol rather than drugs is a problem. Alcohol detoxification is carried out in the medical unit and day detoxification is carried out in psychiatric units.

The substance misuse co-ordinator has a three-year project to set up integrated care services for people who live in the Western Isles.

A study is looking at families who misuse substances. The shared care system has introduced some protocols in care assessment. The main need is for training in parenting skills. The Child Protection Committee set up a child protection training development post in February 2003 to support parents who misuse substances and their children.

STRADA training is provided for a range of staff.

The Council should complete its review of joint processes for assessing and managing the care of people being discharged from detoxification facilities.

Joining up community care services with health

There has been limited progress across the joint future agenda. This is attributed to recent operational problems at the Health Board and a difficulty in engaging the Health Board over financial contributions and management structures. The financial deficit at the Health Board is a particular challenge to joint working. There has been a significant level of development and training in single shared assessment. This is the strongest developed element of the joint future agenda in the Western Isles.

Progress in improved joint working is measured through the Joint Performance Information and Assessment Framework (JPIAF), which has been agreed by SWSI, Audit Scotland and NHS Scotland. Recent evaluation of the partnership's progress in the 5 areas of joint management, joint governance human resources, joint resourcing and single shared assessment suggest that the joint arrangements were insufficiently evidenced or progressed, although subsequent information has indicated that there are now significant developments. The local partners were recommended to:

  • consider the pace of progress including the phased implementation of some aspects of joint management arrangements during 2003/2004.
  • articulate the service components to be included under single management.
  • clarify the functions/delegated powers of the Joint Future Committee.
  • develop and publish a full scheme of delegation in relation to the Joint Future Committee, single manager and the single management of locality teams.
  • develop appropriate policies on services/clinical governance and in the handling of complaints in support of single/locality teams.
  • take steps to address the matters in respect of the completeness and appropriateness of their joint human resource arrangements included in their full Local Partnership Agreement as at 1 April 2003.
  • take steps to further develop financial management arrangements (both strategic and operational), financial protocols (both strategic and operational), an agreed statement of joint resourcing strategic financial envelope for older people's services, and an agreed statement of joint resourcing operational budget for older people's services.
  • Take positive steps in respect of the following arrangements for the implementation of single shared assessment. Ensure housing services are included, move from development to implementation, implement arrangements for access to resources, and produce a protocol for information sharing.

On the ground, generic teams in Lewis and Harris, Uist and Barra provide community care services (in Uist and Barra they also cover children's services). All community care groups are served under joint working arrangements. A number of services have been developed within a framework jointly agreed with the health service, though they are funded mainly by the Council. There are no formal joint teams - the operation of services is driven by informal co-operation and joint management of cases. 60 to 70 single shared assessments have been completed and the partners are using them to design appropriate services for individuals.

The Council's new OLM computer system is being introduced from March 2004 and will cover all client groups and support information-sharing with the health service. Systems for sharing information have been developed through single shared assessment and set out both within the training and the aims of the Modernising Government Funds project. Information is recorded on paper at the moment.

Working with carers

The Council has set up a forum for a number of voluntary sector organisations to develop support for carers 24 hours day, seven days a week. They cover the whole of the Western Isles. Support includes the opportunity for respite care, advocacy and a basic carer's assessment through single shared assessment which is provided for all carers with an active support role at the moment. The Council keeps details of all carers assessed through the single shared assessment process. There have been up to 60 carers' assessments, but social work predicts this figure will increase as single shared assessments become firmly established across the whole area from April 2003. The Council uses the local community care forum to bring together a range of voluntary sector organisations, purchasers and carers interests.

Children and Young People

Looked after children

The number of children and young people who are looked after in kinship placements reduced from 11 in 2000 to fewer than five in 2002 when some families moved out of the area. The Council pays kinship carers the same as foster carers.

Fostering and adoption

Five children from several families are waiting for a foster placement. The number of carers available is limited, and there are other complications in matching children with carers which are partly geographical. It is especially difficult to place children from larger families. A recent recruitment campaign which involved press adverts and a poster campaign failed to recruit any carers.

Carers receive the COSLA rate of pay enhanced by 33%. The Council can enhance payments in exceptional circumstances.

No children are fostered out of the area, but children from other areas are fostered in the Western Isles.

Fewer than five children are in pre-adoptive placements (foster carers are adopting them) but the placements were made by other authorities. There is an agreement between the islands for fostering very young children.

Educational attainment

Fewer than five 16 to 17 year olds ceased to be looked after in 2001-2002 in Eilean Siar so no figures are available on their educational attainment. To improve educational attainment, the Council will:

  • regularly screen the attendance and attainment of children and young people who are looked after;
  • provide support for meeting literacy and numeracy targets;
  • provide additional support to tackle absences; and
  • introduce personal learning plans with targets set by the young people themselves.

All young people are in full-time education. The Alternative Curriculum project (ACE) is jointly-funded by Education and Social Work and plays an important part in avoiding mainland placement of children when there are other suitable options.

There is no formal monitoring and assessment of the quality of education in care plans.

The Council does not know whether all schools have a designated teacher for children and young people who are looked after.

Throughcare and aftercare

The Council is creating a new throughcare and aftercare post. Throughcare and aftercare information on care leavers, including information on employment and accommodation, can be obtained manually.

The leaving care project provides chalets for young people and they will then be given their own tenancies. There is one supported lodging placement.

Mental health

There is no mental health team or strategy for children but a service is delivered to some children according to individual need. Services for children are developed within a mental health partnership, but these services are limited. Services include:

  • a clinical psychology service, provided on a sessional basis;
  • a visiting service by a child psychiatrist once a month;
  • programmes in schools to improve mental health; and
  • early identification, referral and intervention, carried out by Surestart.

Child protection

In contrast with the fairly low rate of child protection referrals, high rates of children are the subject of a case conference and there are high rates of registration on the child protection register. The number of registrations has doubled between 2000-2001 and 2001-2002. Initial referrals are assessed and only counted as a referral once they have been confirmed as a concern. A high number of cases that go to case conference are registered.

55% of children on the register in 2001-2002 had been on it before - the highest rate in Scotland. Many of these children have parents with alcohol problems.

The Council has put in place a number of child protection initiatives, including a jointly-funded post of Child Protection Co-ordinator. The Council aims to:

  • revise the hospital referral form so that children can be referred when they attend accident and emergency departments;
  • review the Child Protection Committee structure and membership;
  • produce information leaflets
  • make an audit of a sample of cases which cover good and bad practice; and
  • review training to align more closely to local needs.

Children with disabilities

Services for children with disabilities are provided through community care. The Council does not routinely record disability. The number of children with a record of need has increased since Uist and Barra have had an educational psychologist. The Council has expanded respite care, which is jointly funded by the health service.

  • NCH provide outreach care in the home (the carer can leave the home for a few hours or the worker takes the child out).
  • NCH provide a residential respite service for children with severe disabilities.
  • Other children get more specialist respite care in Inverness and Glasgow.

The generic care at home service identifies families and children affected by disability but there are no direct services for young carers. The new register of carers will identify young carers. One of the current programmes for the new community school, based at the Nicolson Institue, is to identify and support young carers.

The Council is testing out a Single Shared Assessment form. It is a common referral form with an assessment element.

Working of children's hearings

All referrals were made within five working days of the case conference (standard 2) in 2001-2002.

74% of reports were submitted within 20 working days of the date of request (standard 3), almost meeting the target of 75%.

All supervision requirements with no condition of residence are given effect within 15 working days of the date of issue by the children's hearing (standard 15).

Youth Justice

There is no youth crime strategy. As quite few young people commit crime, there are no specific programmes for young people.

The Alternative Curriculum Education (ACE) project, funded by social work and education, is aimed at young people who:

  • are at risk of being excluded from school;
  • have committed offences; or
  • are on the edge of criminal activities.

The project is designed to keep children in the islands so they do not have to go to residential school. The Council is carrying out an early assessment of this.

Ceum Eile Air Adhart project, in conjunction with NCH, focuses on children and families affected by domestic abuse and under-age drinking.

Criminal Justice

Structure

While Eilean Siar is not in a formal criminal justice grouping, the authority is committed to inter-island communication and co-ordination with Shetland and Orkney. To date this has resulted in sharing of strategic plans and ideas about how to deliver services in the islands context, discussion of responses to national consultation documents, and some initial work on quality assurance issues. The authority hopes to develop this in the near future.

Since October 2002, the Western Isles have had a dedicated social work post to manage delivery of criminal justice services across the island areas.

Workload

Demand for core services over the past year has increased with a 31% rise in social enquiry reports, a 28% rise in community service orders and a 50% rise in probation orders. The rise in workload has required the new criminal justice service manager to take on a full operational caseload with the result that she has not been able to address a number of strategic issues. The authority is of the view that a sufficient workload now exists in Lewis and Harris to warrant funding of a specialist criminal justice worker, and this is now in place.

Despite the pressures the authority continues to perform well on key performance indicators.

Effective practice

The Western Isles assesses the needs and risk presented by offenders through use of the Scottish Executive risk assessment guidance framework. The tool is currently used by generic social workers undertaking criminal justice tasks. The authority has no current means of monitoring consistency of use by these workers and states that establishment of a monitoring framework will be a priority for the service manager when operational workload pressures permit.

Alcohol abuse presents as a significant factor and is much more prevalent than drug abuse in the area. A fairly common condition of a probation order is attendance at the Church of Scotland's Lifestyle Centre, a resource for those with alcohol misuse problems. A Care and Respect Drink Driving programme is also available in Stornoway, run jointly by criminal justice social work and Northern Constabulary. It is planned to extend this to the Lochmaddy Court area. No evaluation information on the impact of either the resource or programme is currently available. This again will be a future priority of the service manager.

Supervised Attendance Orders were imposed in the island areas for the first time this year, involving input from a range of agencies on Careers, adult literacy and alcohol/drug awareness. Numbers are small but gradually increasing.

Public protection

An inter agency protocol for sex offenders was introduced in November 2002. Sex offenders are jointly assessed and managed with the Police. The service is aware that due to the low numbers and infrequency of demand for the service, other key areas are less clear about their roles and responsibilities and intends to develop this in the near future.

The authority is conscious of the need to access specialist advice and support for staff working with high risk offenders and intends to explore means of doing so over the coming year.

Quality assurance

The authority acknowledges that more work needs to be done in adopting quality assurance systems and monitoring and evaluation measures. It is anticipated that a new IT system will be in place by the end of 2004 and will assist this process.

Human Resource

Structure of the workforce

Between 2000 and 2002 both the number of whole time equivalent fieldwork staff and vacancies across all services have been fairly stable. In the same period, the number of whole time equivalent social work staff has also stayed the same and the only vacancy shown is in services for children (an increase in 2002 from no vacancies shown in the previous two years.)

The Council's latest, unconfirmed figures suggest that, at the end of June 2003, the social worker establishment (whole time equivalent including vacancies) was 15.6 compared with 14 in October 2002. The number of social work vacancies was two as compared with one in October 2002.

Staff numbers have increased by 6% in 2002, but the problem areas are:

  • recruiting and keeping children's services social workers, where the vacancy rate is very high; and
  • recruiting home care staff which may improve with the introduction of a career structure and different contracts.

The Council has no computerised age profile of staff. Service managers monitor turnover by age.

Support for staff

The Council will address the recommendations of Support for Frontline Staff.

Sickness absence rates are not readily available, but levels are thought to be higher among manual than APT&C staff.

Working towards a more highly qualified workforce

In terms of working towards a more highly qualified workforce:

  • 29 staff have DipSW and the Council supports one staff member at a time through DipSW training;
  • nine have SVQ level 3 (there are currently four candidates);
  • 59 have SVQ level 2 (there are currently 16 candidates);
  • there are four practice teachers;
  • the Council is working with Lews Castle to offer a registered manager award and SVQ level 4; and
  • the Council is working with the Highlands and Islands to offer more effective CPD for staff through the UHI network; this work should also help develop a strategy that complies with the code for employers.

Preparation for registration

Council staff were among the first to have to register with the Scottish Social Services Council in April 2003. To meet the requirements set out in the Scottish Social Services Council codes for employers, the Council is exploring with UHI more effective ways of enabling staff to undertake continuous professional development.

Race Equality

0.6% of the local population are from a minority ethnic group compared with 2% for Scotland as a whole.

Race Equality is viewed as part of the Council's equal opportunities policy. None of the significant problems that are being faced elsewhere arise in the Western Isles, although people do have a strong sense of cultural differences.

The Council monitors at a corporate level the introduction of arrangements for identifying and addressing the needs of black and minority ethnic groups.

Use of Information Communications Technology (ICT)

Social Services Department

Fieldwork staff, except those in residential units and day care, have access to computers. Individual units and centres each have a computer and staff have unrestricted access to the Internet. The Council strategy for information technology reflects departmental needs, and social work is part of that strategy. The approach to the modernising government agenda is gradual, in keeping with the size of the authority.

Partnerships

At present, the Carenap system allows exchange of information with the health service on older people. The introduction of the new OLM Care Base will improve and widen the scope for sharing information.

Background Profile

Population

The total population has decreased over the years and now stands at 26,502.
People of working age account for 58%, compared with 62% nationally.
By 2016 the local population is predicted to decrease by a massive 15% (compared to 2% nationally), with a large 21% decrease in people of working age and a 16% increase in people above working age (the national figures are a 3% fall and a 17% increase).

Employment

91% of working age people are in work - a significantly higher percentage than the Scottish average of 74%.
Compared with the whole of Scotland, there is a higher percentage of jobs in agriculture, forestry and fishing, and a lower percentage in finance and business.

Unemployment

The local rate of unemployment is 3.2% (May 2003) - less than the figure of 3.8% for Scotland as a whole.
Unemployment has decreased by 17% over the last year, compared with 2% nationally.
59% of unemployed people have been out of work for six months or more, compared with 43% nationally.

Other features

The teenage pregnancy rate was 20.7 for every 1000 females aged between 13 and 19, less than half the figure of 43.3 for Scotland (2001).
For every 1,000 people aged 16 and above, 57 people claimed Housing
Benefit, half of the 112 claims made nationally (August 2001).
34 % of households were single people, compared with 33% for Scotland (2001).
The police recorded only 272 crimes for every 10,000 people, less than a third of the 843 for Scotland as a whole (2002).
The area has a very low level of drug misuse (0.5% of 15 to 54 year olds in 2001), but the incidence of alcohol misuse is high.

Eilean Siar covers the Outer Hebrides, which includes several inhabited islands. Most of the population live on Lewis and Harris. Stornoway is the main centre of population with the rest living in scattered crofting townships.

The main economic sectors in terms of employment are public administration, fishing and fish farming, retail, wholesale and tourism. Between 1995 and 2001, there was a notable increase in the number of jobs in the service sector, with some reduction in production and construction.

Spend per head on Social Work in 2001-2002 was 418, significantly above the figure of 267 for Scotland.

Expected population change

chart

Community Care

Balance of care - older people (aged 65+)

2000
actual

2000
per 1,000
(Quartile)

2001
actual

2001
per 1,000
(Quartile)

2002
actual

2002
per 1,000
(Quartile)

In residential care homes

164

32(1)

168

33(1)

167

33(1)

In private nursing homes

62

12(4)

64

13(4)

62

12(4)

Receiving home care

735

143(1)

712

139(1)

702

137(1)

Receiving 20+ hours home care per week

48

9.4(1)

30

5.9(1)

31

6.1(1)

In special needs housing

211

41.1(4)

757

147.4(1)

284

54(4)


People receiving a community care service

1999-2000
actual

1999-2000
per 1,000
(Quartile)

2000-2001
actual

2000-2001
per 1,000
(Quartile)

2001-2002
actual

2001-2002
per 1,000
(Quartile)

Older people (aged 65+)

1,001

194.9(3)

1,036

200.8(3)

986

192(3)

For mental health problems/ dementia (aged 18-64)

38

2.4(3)

34

2.1(4)

40

2.5(4)

For physical disabilities (aged 18-64)

36

2.2(4)

29

1.8(4)

21

1.3(4)

For learning disabilities (aged 18-64)

48

3(3)

51

3.2(3)

57

3.6(3)

For drug/alcohol abuse problems (aged 18-64)

19

1.2(2)

20

1.2(2)

24

1.5(2)

chart

Expenditure on Community Care has risen gradually in the period 1999-2002.

Children and Young People

Balance of care - Looked after children

1999-2000
actual

1999-2000
per 1,000
(Quartile)

2000-2001
actual

2000-2001
per 1,000
(Quartile)

2001-2002
actual

2001-2002
per 1,000
(Quartile)

At home

23

3.8(2)

36

5.9(1)

31

5.5(2)

With friends/relatives/ other community

11

1.8(1)

9

1.5(1)

<5

0.7(3)

With foster carers/ prospective adopters

10

1.7(4)

8

1.3(4)

7

1.2(4)

In residential accommodation

5

0.8(4)

7

1.2(2)

6

1.1(3)

Total

49

8.1(2)

60

9.9(2)

48

8.5(2)


Key performance indicators
Child Protection

1999-2000
actual

1999-2000
per 1,000
(Quartile)

2000-2001
actual

2000-2001
per 1,000
(Quartile)

2001-2002
actual

2001-2002
per 1,000
(Quartile)

Child protection (CP) referrals

23

4.3(4)

16

3(4)

29

5.9(3)

Children subject to a CP case conference

9

1.7(4)

10

1.9(3)

20

4(1)

Children placed on CP register

8

1.5(3)

9

1.7(2)

18

3.6(1)


Looked After Children

2001-2002
actual

2001-2002
percentage

Looked after children with 3+ placements

<5

-

Educational attainment of Looked After Children (number of 16 & 17 year olds ceasing to be looked after away from home attaining Standard grade Maths & English)

<5

-

chart

Expenditure has risen very gradually in children's services in the period 1999-2002.

Criminal Justice

Key Activities

2001- 2002

2002- 2003

Number of social enquiry reports submitted to the courts during the year

77

101

Number of community service orders made during the year

29

37

Number of probation orders made

18

27


Performance

2000- 2001

2001- 2002

Proportion of social enquiry reports submitted to the courts by the due date

98.6

100

Average length of community service hours completed

171

170

Average number of community service hours completed per week

5.4

5.0

Human Resources

Fieldwork Staff by client group

WTE
2000
actual

WTE
2000
per 1,000
(Quartile)

WTE
2001
actual

WTE
2001
per 1,000
(Quartile)

WTE
2002
actual

WTE
2002
per 1,000
(Quartile)

with adults

10

0.5(3)

11

0.5(3)

11

0.5(4)

with children

8

1.3(4)

8

1.3(4)

7

1.2(4)

with offenders

1

0.1(4)

1

0.1(4)

2

0.1(4)

Generic workers

7

0.3(3)

7

0.3(3)

7

0.3(3)


Fieldwork Vacancies by client group

WTE
2000
actual

WTE
2000
percent
(Quartile)

WTE
2001
actual

WTE
2001
percent
(Quartile)

WTE
2002
actual

WTE
2002
percent
(Quartile)

with adults

0

0(4)

0

0(4)

0

0(4)

with children

0

0(4)

0

0(4)

1

12.5(2)

with offenders

0

0(3)

0

0(4)

0

0(4)

Generic workers

0

0(4)

0

0(4)

1

12.5(1)


Social Workers in post

WTE
2000
actual

WTE
2000
per 1,000
(Quartile)

WTE
2001
actual

WTE
2001
per 1,000
(Quartile)

WTE
2002
actual

WTE
2002
per 1,000
(Quartile)

SWs with adults

5

0.2(2)

6

0.3(2)

6

0.3(2)

SWs with children

5

0.8(4)

5

0.8(4)

4

0.7(4)

SWs with offenders

0

0.0(4)

0

0.0(4)

0

0(4)

Generic workers

3

0.1(2)

3

0.1(1)

4

0.1(2)

Total

13

0.5(4)

14

0.5(4)

14

0.5(4)


Social Work Vacancies

WTE
2000
Vacancies

WTE
2000
% Vacancies

WTE
2001
Vacancies

WTE
2001
% Vacancies

WTE
2002
Vacancies

WTE
2002
% Vacancies

SWs with adults

0

0.0

0

0.0

0

0.0

SWs with children

0

0.0

0

0.0

1

20.0

SWs with offenders

0

0.0

0

0.0

0

0.0

Generic workers

0

0.0

0

0.0

0

0.0

Total

0

0.0

0

0.0

1

6.7