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Fire Statistics Scotland, 2000

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FIRE STATISTICS SCOTLAND, 2000

10 Casualties from fires by location group, Scotland, 1990-2000 (Table 4) (Charts 4 & 5)

10.1 Table 4 illustrates the number of casualties by location group. As these fires involve casualties, they are all, by definition, primary fires. It can be seen that fatal casualties in Scotland mainly occur in dwellings fires. The figures for 2000 show that out of a total of 75 fatal casualties; 67 (89 per cent) occurred in dwellings fires, 2 (3 per cent) occurred in other buildings, 4 (5 per cent) occurred in road vehicles and 2 (3 per cent) occurred in other outdoors. The number of total fatal casualties in Scotland in 2000 was the lowest in the last ten years.

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10.2 The figures for 2000 show that out of a total of 2,263 non-fatal casualties, 1,999 occurred in dwellings fires (88 per cent), 138 (6 per cent) occurred in other buildings, 78 (3 per cent) occurred in road vehicles and 48 (2 per cent) occurred in other outdoors. These are similar proportions to those for fatal casualties. The total number non-fatal casualties rose by 9 (less than 1 per cent) since 1999. Non-fatal casualties in dwellings rose by 3 (less than 1 per cent). Other buildings non-fatal casualties fell by 20 (13 per cent). Non-fatal casualties in road vehicles rose by 23 (42 per cent) and other outdoor non-fatal casualties rose by 3 injuries (7 per cent). Since 1990 the total number of non-fatal casualties in Scotland has risen by 432 (24 per cent) and the number of total non-fatal casualties in Scotland in 2000 was the highest in ten years. Dwellings non-fatal casualties rose by 375 (23 per cent), other buildings non-fatal casualties fell by 2 (1 per cent), road vehicles non-fatal casualties increased by 60 (333 per cent) and other outdoor non-fatal casualties fell by 1 (2 per cent).

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